Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

41 - 54 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #43
So who's got the Steering dampers on their 2013+ models?
Your experience, review, recommendations?

Or not needed?

Get your susspension set for you, after that you'll see it's not a must, it give a benefit on track or on hard riding... I found it's needed for me but I'll wait to get a good deal on ohlins...

Meanwhile replacing to SS lines is a must.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Fake Chinese copy of Ohlins? Hope it doesn’t lock up and kill you...
had my first track day on Saturday with the cheap chinese copy that i posted earlier in this thread. Sorry to inform you it did not lock up and kill me.

in fact, it worked quit well.

I have never called anyone a twat on line before. And so far, i am managing to maintain that record.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,911 Posts
had my first track day on Saturday with the cheap chinese copy that i posted earlier in this thread. Sorry to inform you it did not lock up and kill me.

in fact, it worked quit well.

I have never called anyone a twat on line before. And so far, i am managing to maintain that record.
Defensive over the Chineseium lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
You really needed a damper? I only track mine, I have the same ‘15 in the pictures, and mine has the slowest, but stable, steering of any sportbike I’ve ever ridden. And that’s after Roger set it up, and I was thinking of raising the rear or lowering the front for better turn in. Never once have I gotten more that a wiggle out of the front, even at the highest speed track I’ve been on. I cant imagine putting a damper on that slow steering pig. Are y’all running 60’s on the rear for quicker steering?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I got the chinesium ohlins replica damper last summer. I'm not sure I trust it. Mind you, I've never had a shake but I feel like I'm at high risk since half the time I'm riding I'm only on 1 wheel. The chinesium initially felt good in that the knob works, it provides adjustable resistance ranging from almost none to a shit load. But after spending some time on it I've noticed that it damps significantly more when it moves on direction compared to the other direction. This makes me feel like it might make things worse in a wobble? Unless this is normal and thats just the normal damping forces at work and thats how the other dampers feel? I somewhat doubt this and kinda wanna just get a brand name damper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
i dont recall any of my dampers feeling stiffer one way than the other. Certainly nothing noticeable! So, yeah, i wouldnt be too happy about that in a slapper situation!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
i dont recall any of my dampers feeling stiffer one way than the other. Certainly nothing noticeable! So, yeah, i wouldnt be too happy about that in a slapper situation!!!
Yeah I didnt think so lol. Like with every cycle the slapper goes through... if it damps harder when the bars go left than it does when they go right... wouldnt the whole bike veer to one side? I'm thinking that might even be worse than just having no damper lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,900 Posts
Yeah I didnt think so lol. Like with every cycle the slapper goes through... if it damps harder when the bars go left than it does when they go right... wouldnt the whole bike veer to one side? I'm thinking that might even be worse than just having no damper lol
A slapper is the repeating run away lock to lock oscillation.... Even if the damper works better one way, it will still stop the slapper, because it will kill the energy of the oscillation.

It only has to slow it down enough for you to be able to maintain control of the bars. It won't stop the wheel from centering the forks.... Just going to be slightly slower centering from one direction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
A slapper is the repeating run away lock to lock oscillation.... Even if the damper works better one way, it will still stop the slapper, because it will kill the energy of the oscillation.

It only has to slow it down enough for you to be able to maintain control of the bars. It won't stop the wheel from centering the forks.... Just going to be slightly slower centering from one direction.
So are you saying it would still be good? My concern is that if it dampens stronger in 1 direction then when the slapper cranks the bars back and forth it might go 100% to the right and then 95% left and then 100% to the right and then 95% left etc etc and I might veer off to one side rather than travelling in a straight line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,900 Posts
So are you saying it would still be good? My concern is that if it dampens stronger in 1 direction then when the slapper cranks the bars back and forth it might go 100% to the right and then 95% left and then 100% to the right and then 95% left etc etc and I might veer off to one side rather than travelling in a straight line.
The motion of the fork is the result of bouncing off the stops at the ends of the arc..... if the energy of the bounce is drained away, the bounce stops. Doesn't really matter if that happens in only one direction, so long as it is reduced enough to stop the cycle from repeating.

The cycle is started when the wheel hits the ground with the forks not aligned with the direction of travel.... pulled to one side or the other. When the trail of the contact patch pulls the fork into alignment with the direction of travel it overshoots, and smacks off the opposite stop. This happens far more often with steep fork arrangements, 25° out of vertical and steeper. The distance the contact patch is behind where the fork would hit the road is the 'trail' and that is the only self centering force available to return the front wheel to alignment with the direction of travel. The greater the trail, the greater the force the tire can exert on the fork. Leverage.

Choppers with 35-40+ ° of rake, are almost impossible to get into a tank slapper, because they inherently have 6+" of trail. It takes far more upset to initiate a slapper when there is more negative, self correcting feedback.

Stiff racing suspensions high power, choppy pavement, leaned over so the fork loses a lot of the suspension action, and you increase the chance of a slapper. Add in stiction, bad tires, tire pressure, bent tubes, bent frame....... much more likely.

The only function of the steering damper, is to limit the speed at which the forks can be twisted. They shouldn't impact normal day to day steering inputs. They should realistically only perform any function when the rate of twist is inhumanly fast.

The forks become the clapper in a bell, and 'ring' against the stops. The overshoot which occurs as the (very short) trail tries to center the wheel to the direction of travel adds energy to the swinging. Because there is little correction (negative feedback), the point at which the cycle overshoots repeatedly is more easily attained.

It hits resonance, and an oscillation is created. Doesn't take a lot of energy to maintain that...... similar to pushing a child on a swing -- once they are swinging as high as you dare, it takes just a little effort to keep them going at the same speed/height. Almost all of the kinetic energy is stored in the swinging to height. You just have to make up for the losses.

You don't slow a kid down on a swing by slowing them equally in both directions, do you? You just shorten the arc, and the energy bleeds off.

Same thing here..... you just need to take enough energy out of the system, that the oscillation cannot be sustained.

It only takes a swing or two to damp off enough to stop the oscillation, and would likely be caught before the slapper ever gets to a full head of steam.
 
41 - 54 of 54 Posts
Top