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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello to everyone im new here so not sure if im posting this correctly,but i would like some help.
I just bought a 2009 zx6r in in mint condition only 3254 Klm's on it,it was unregistered for just over 2 years and been sitting in the garage for 6 years,1 owner all books and history, anyway the guy that i bought it from said he has been starting it regularly, i took it home and was fine.
Last Friday i went to get it registered and that was fine,BUT on the way back home as im riding gearing down and closed throttle the bike turns of on me it did it a few times and while holding clutch in and push the start button it starts fine.
Any ideas what it can be ?? I just did a service oil oil filter spark plugs and cleaned the air filter as i order the wrong one,also i dumped 6 litres of fuel and put fresh 98 octane but i havent been out yet as the weather is been shity and raining.
 

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It may be the battery, or a number of other possible problems…. First thing I would do is increase the idle speed a few hundred rpm and see how it responds.

Any bike that has sat that much is likely to have issues. Tires, chain, brakes, suspension, electrical connections, there a plethora of items that require service due to age, rather than mileage alone. Even the coolant eventually goes off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Battery is new i checked all fuses plugs and wiring,i did increase the idle a litle by 200 ill take it out for a run when the weather eases of and i will let youse know how it went i guess ill change the fuel filter as well.
Thank you all for helping out and all the ideas it is much appreciated,also i might do the code check and see how that goes.
 

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The only fuel filter is directly connected to the fuel pump, within the fuel tank. There’s a very strong probability that your tank has varnish and rust inside. Fresh fuel will do nothing to correct it.

The fuel standing in the tank for very long periods of time will become unusable, as the lighter parts of the blend evaporate and get vented out of the tank when the air pressure inside the tank increases as it warms up.

A tiny amount of water (humidity) migrates into the tank every time the air cools down and is sucked in to equalize pressure. That water accumulates as it drops to the bottom of the tank. Can’t evaporate out, temperature never gets high enough.

Those water droplets can form the basis of electrolytic cells, as they can bridge the gap between molecules of different metals which make up the steel of the tank. Tiny wet cell batteries, which will break down the metal.

Pin hole leaks at the lowest point of the tank are the end result.

A very similar process occurs in the brake systems. The introduction of water happens by other means, but the result is similar. Pitting of the bores leading to a loss of pressure is the final result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you again for the info i did look in the tank with a torch and it looked very clean no rust spots or any other fragments,but i will empty my tank again and youse a strainer to re fill it and put a new filter. Thanks again.
 

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I don’t think you can really look at the areas most likely to rust with a flashlight, from the filler neck. The highest points in the tank area above any angle you could see, and the lowest points aren’t in a direct line of sight either. A borescope camera would be the best bet, other than taking the tank off and pulling the fuel pump.

(I will state for the record that I have not ever removed my fuel pump from my tank)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Of course why didnt i think of that,i got a bore scope that attaches to my phone via usb,oo boy i bought it a few years back just for the fun of it i never thought i was going to need it.
Thank you for bringing this up.
 

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Interesting piece of trivia….. HID lighting was developed to provide light during Arthroscopic surgery. Fiber optic projection from the tip of the fiber….. not 100% efficient, so a lot of low temperature light had to be generated at the other end of the light pipe. Viola!
 

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I would suggest exercising the idiot switches after flooding them with WD-40 to free them up. And, go through all of the electrical connectors you can find on the bike and flood each one with dielectric grease. Intermittent electrical connections occur when a bike sits for years due to corrosion and sticky spring loaded switches.
 
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