Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sorry, Youtube doesn't allow embedding of this video, so have to click the link. Video gives me goose bumps. I've never been on a track yet, what exactly induces these wobbles, and would the steering damper help mitigate them?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzB6KSlD6ec
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
ive had that happen and what it is the back tire is just not sticking and that shit sucks and scared the fuck out of me when it happened to me mine wasnt big like those but damn i thought i was done
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,282 Posts
I've never had the back end step out like that but had a few scarey wobbles on the front!

Not nice at all. I take it it's letting me know I'm pushing the bike too hard lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
742 Posts
I would have been toast on anyone of those
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I would straight up shit my pants at 1:18 or 2:01 if that happened to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,661 Posts
what exactly induces these wobbles, and would the steering damper help mitigate them?
Since nobody has yet to actually answer or try answering your question I'll try to help explain.

Most of these in this video are due to the rear wheel losing traction and "stepping out" and causing near high-sides. Keep in mind GP bikes are lighter than our 600's and have nearly 250 hp... so there's A LOT of power being sent to the rear wheel. Which is why all GP bikes have very advanced traction control systems.... Getting on the throttle too hard while leaned over far will get this to happen. Most commong reaction is to chop the throttle when this happens. This would be a no no. Chopping the throttle allows the rear wheel to suddenly regain traction and buck the bike and throw the rider off. In most cases staying ON the gas will actually save the highside. Basically "drifting" the bike until the bike catches up to the stepping out in the ass end.

A steering damper has no real effect on this because it's not having much to do with the front wheel.

What a damper will do is dampen the effects of a "tank slapper" in the front end. Say you get the front wheel off of the ground a little and it sets back down at an angle... this can cause the tank slapper. Staying LOOSE and relaxed on the bars is improtant when this happens. Stiffening up on the bars tranfsers all of the force through your arms... through your body and into the rear of the bike... making things worse. And just like a rear end slide out... chopping the throttle can have an ill effect as your then loading up the weight to the front wheel... where all this back and forth action and momentum is happening. Getting ON the gas and lightening up the front end will help slow the tank slapper and get the bike back under control.

There is much more too but that's pretty much some of the basics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,633 Posts
shits fuckin nuts
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Since nobody has yet to actually answer or try answering your question I'll try to help explain.

Most of these in this video are due to the rear wheel losing traction and "stepping out" and causing near high-sides. Keep in mind GP bikes are lighter than our 600's and have nearly 250 hp... so there's A LOT of power being sent to the rear wheel. Which is why all GP bikes have very advanced traction control systems.... Getting on the throttle too hard while leaned over far will get this to happen. Most commong reaction is to chop the throttle when this happens. This would be a no no. Chopping the throttle allows the rear wheel to suddenly regain traction and buck the bike and throw the rider off. In most cases staying ON the gas will actually save the highside. Basically "drifting" the bike until the bike catches up to the stepping out in the ass end.

A steering damper has no real effect on this because it's not having much to do with the front wheel.

What a damper will do is dampen the effects of a "tank slapper" in the front end. Say you get the front wheel off of the ground a little and it sets back down at an angle... this can cause the tank slapper. Staying LOOSE and relaxed on the bars is improtant when this happens. Stiffening up on the bars tranfsers all of the force through your arms... through your body and into the rear of the bike... making things worse. And just like a rear end slide out... chopping the throttle can have an ill effect as your then loading up the weight to the front wheel... where all this back and forth action and momentum is happening. Getting ON the gas and lightening up the front end will help slow the tank slapper and get the bike back under control.

There is much more too but that's pretty much some of the basics.
Thanks, I appreciate the knowledge very much. Cool as the saves video is to watch, I really wanted to know what causes it and what to do about it.

Great passdown, thank you very much!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,661 Posts
Thanks, I appreciate the knowledge very much. Cool as the saves video is to watch, I really wanted to know what causes it and what to do about it.

Great passdown, thank you very much!
You betcha! Ride safe! :bigthumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
703 Posts
hat's some major skill staying on those machines. I think I would have been toast for all o those damn near.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top