Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1. What are the differences between waxing/lubing the chain and which is better?

2. I've got Motul Wax, should I purchase lube too?

3. Can I use WD40?

*I couldnt use it on my BMW F700gs, but I saw a guy using it as it was mentioned in a previous thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
This is a contentious topic….. the answer is subjective and relies on which aesthetic you prefer.

Primary points for consideration:

Visual appeal
Overall cleanliness
Chain life

I look at this in reverse order to most. My primary goal is to get the maximum life from the chain for the least effort, and cost. Using the technique I support, the chain will last the life of the sprockets @ ~15K miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
Ah, chain maintenance. Nearly as religious as oil choice (Rotella T6, btw ;)) and the source of much angst. This is my $0.02 (Canadian, at that) on your questions. Keep in mind this is based on my experience only, YMMV.

1) Lube theoretically can get drawn back inside the sealed compartments in the rollers, but I have my doubts on that. It does provide some cushion for the rollers when they contact the sprockets, but I have never seen rollers wear out before the links start going tight and/or kinking. Wax is simply corrosion protection as far as I know.

2) I use Maxima chain wax for corrosion protection and it has worked fine. Doesn't get flung all over the bike and cleans up pretty easily when I clean the chain.

3) I use WD40 for cleaning my chains. It works fine and doesn't hurt the O-rings but offers zero corrosion protection.

For years all I did was clean with WD40, leaving the chains dry after cleaning to avoid attracting any grit that will kill a chain quickly. This works because I live in a very dry area and my bikes are garaged, so I have few problems with corrosion. If your bike lives outside or you live in a humid area then you need something to keep it from rusting solid. Using the WD40 and no lube I regularly got 30,000+ km out of a chain set, which is good enough for me and it was easy and simple to do.

From what I can see the major causes of chain failure are corrosion and being adjusted too tight. Avoid those and you should get lots of life out of a decent quality chain.


Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
The longest life you can get on any chain driven bike, is to use something similar to a Scot Oiler on it. The Oiler does exactly what you think.... it drops oil on the chain whenever the chain is running through the sprockets. That oil is then flung off the chain, along with whatever grit, water, etc. it will have picked up off the chain and sprocket teeth. The term for this is a total loss oiling system.

The variations within the Scot line up can reduce the amount of oil applied to a moderate level of overkill. Any way you look at it, the result is a lot of oil fling. The results by way of reported mileage through Lloyd(RiversZZR)'s shop indicate you could easily get 40+K miles out of a chain that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
1. What are the differences between waxing/lubing the chain and which is better?

2. I've got Motul Wax, should I purchase lube too?

3. Can I use WD40?

*I couldnt use it on my BMW F700gs, but I saw a guy using it as it was mentioned in a previous thread.
I use the Motul lube spray because it's easy to apply and doesn't make a mess. I use WD40 to clean the chain, let it dry and apply the wax every 500-600 miles.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mmattockx

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,429 Posts
If aerosol spray is your choice of lubrication then you absolutely cannot beat the motul chain lube in the 9 ounce can... there is absolutely nothing better out of an aerosol can!!!!!!




That said, it still uses propellants to get it out of the can and the best application method is to ride the bike, get the chain hot and then spray it the lube on the entire roller surface, then walk the fuck away for atleast 12 hours while the propellants evaporate away
nearly zero fling and lasts a long time in dry conditions (no lube lasts worth shit in rain or gravel roads...not a one!)
 
  • Helpful
Reactions: misnblu

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
I have a Scottoiler on my Yamaha Tracer. Just returned from a 6,500 mile trip. Forgot to take some extra oil with me so ran out near the end and it wound up pretty dry. Chain is a DID X-ring with 16,000 miles on it and looks good, no stiff links. However the Scottoiler is a pain. IMO works best on long trips when the bike runs at a consistent speed for a number of miles. For me doesn't seem to work so well on the shorter trips. On my bike the fling gets on the rear wheel and will accumulate and get streaks running onto the tire. I would up wiping the left half of the rim every day to keep that from happening. Think it occasional will drip on the ground. Washed the bike and it had lots of oily dirt on the engine around the sprocket and cover. Were on the sprocket doesn't seem bad and the rollers look pretty good with no stiff links. I try and keep the amount of oil going onto the chain at a minimum and it seems to work well. Chain looks clean and not too much oily dirt on everything else. This trip rode a few gravel stretches and one road construction stretch that was 5 miles. It had gravel and fine stuff almost like limestone dust that they were wetting down. Glad for the water for traction but wow did it get all over the bike. No rain for the 2,500 miles home to wash it off either! When I was cleaning the bike up did notice some metal flakes that apparently were from the sprocket and chain rollers. Probably due to being dry for too long. After washing I sprayed some Maximum on it and the chain does not look like it has 16,000 miles on it. Scottoiler is good for long trips and don't have to remember to lube the chain at the end of the day.

Have a tube of Motul with a brush and it works well. My favorite is Maximum as it does not fling much and haven't tried the spray Motul - if @riverszzr says its good then it is. Get the chain hot, spray it on and come back the next day and wipe the excess off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
I just applied marine grade bearing grease to this chain last night. This is the third time I’ve done so, over maybe 1500 miles. For me, that’s a bit more often than I typically service the chain as I have been ‘ride first, maintain later’ over the decades.

My method is fairly simple.

Fold a disposable shop towel down to fit comfortably into the palm of my hand (wearing a latex glove) and apply a blob of grease as big as the last digit of my thumb. Squeeze the towel to distribute the grease, press that section of the towel into the rollers and rotate the chain through several complete passes.

Repeat the process from the opposite side of the chain (inner, outer). When everything is coated I wipe of all excess. I don’t see how wax is different than this.

Guitar Musical instrument Guitar accessory Automotive tire Jewellery

Body jewelry Automotive tire Bicycle part Headgear Jewellery
 

·
Registered
2 wheels. 1 engine. Squid pilot😂
Joined
·
11 Posts
Interesting so many using wd40 for cleaning their chain so it must work pretty good. 🤷

I'm a kerosene fan for cleaning followed up with the Motul spray lube.
So what's everybody's take on kerosene and how it may seap past the orings causing loss of lube? 🤔
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
Kerosene is not directly a solvent, so it’s less abusive than practically anything sprayed out of a can. For something thick and sticky to flow well enough to be sprayed, it has to be dissolved in a thinner of some type.

That solvent is what thins the captured grease behind the O rings….. solvents lift away stuff because the molecules are shorter than molecules of the stuff you’re trying to clean, or apply.

Same deal as spray paint…. Waxes, you want to wait until the solvents have evaporated before you touch the parts that you sprayed.

Kerosenes molecular length is much closer to grease than typical solvents. Relatively low penetration past the rings; I have used gear oil for years, because it’s thicker than kerosene, and recently began applying grease as that’s every bit as thick as the grease inside the rollers.

The less damage done to the O rings, and the less solvents applied the longer the grease should stay inside the rollers.

A non O ring chain your best bet is a total loss oiling system…. Think chain saws. Lots of fling, a lot of oil consumption but the chain lasts a relatively long time under harsh conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
So what's everybody's take on kerosene and how it may seap past the orings causing loss of lube? 🤔
Nothing wrong with kerosene. It cleans well, leaves an oily residue for some corrosion protection if you don't use lube and won't hurt the o-rings at all. Mostly I use WD40 for the cleaning because it does a good job and is convenient. If I was going to use a liquid it would be kerosene.

FWIW, kerosene also works great for flushing out forks when changing fluid and/or seals.


Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
When I got back from my last trip on my Tracer noticed a pretty good residue of chain fling around the case near the output sprocket. The ScottOiler ran out of oil a couple of thousand miles from home. From Canada thru Montana, SD, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Mississippi and Alabama there was no rain! Lot of dry and a bit dusty conditions. When cleaning the bike noticed a thick layer of chain fling on the engine around the sprocket. There were some very small shiny flecks on it which I realized was tiny bit of the rollers where they were wearing on the sprocket. No major wear but enough to make me a bit frustrated to have left home without extra chain oil.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top