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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

So I decided to tackle doing a valve inspection/adjustment on my 2013 ZX6R after 30,000 miles. After doing an inspection first I found only 1 valve was out of spec. I triple measured all the valves to be sure.I replaced the shim with the appropriate size and then began the reassembly. I noticed some of the markings I made on the camshaft sprockets and chain wore out, but it looks like they matched up. Installed the camshaft caps and chain guide in proper order and torque specs. Installed the chain tensioner and heard the clicks pushing the boot out while torquing down. I went to crank the engine slowly by hand and noticed the TDC mark in the starter clutch moved as I heard the chain tensioner engage further. As I continue to turn it seems it stops and won't turn any further about 90 degrees in.

Did I perhaps screw the chain timing? Is so, how can I reset this? Any ideas or suggestions on what to do next would be greatly appreciated!
 

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First off, you should have engraved marking for timing on your camshaft sprockets and definitely should not be worn away. My bike is 24 years old and the markings are still there. What do you mean the starter clutch stopped moving? As you turn your engine through a full rotation, the starter clutch does not necessarily have to be moving - the whole purpose of that is so the starter can get it going but instantly disengage as soon as the engine fires up.
 

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If you cannot turn the engine over by hand, I would suspect a cam timing issue resulting in valve contact with a piston. This typically happens when someone installs the cams with the wrong piston at TDC.

Good that you caught it before starting the engine. Take it back apart, make sure #1 is at TDC, and try again.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the inputs.

First off, you should have engraved marking for timing on your camshaft sprockets and definitely should not be worn away.
Yes, I do realize the mistake I made. I only used marker and it faded away a bit due to the oil and me trying to get the chain back on.

What do you mean the starter clutch stopped moving?
As I turn the starter clutch bolt clockwise there is resistance and will not turn over any more.

Take it back apart, make sure #1 is at TDC, and try again.
I was pretty sure it was TDC due to me aligning the TDC mark on the starter clutch with the crankcase marking. Is there a way to verify TDC?
 

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You could pull the spark plug and use a clean thin tool to feel the piston height.

Just be absolutely certain that you've got the cam timing and chain set up correctly, recount the links multiple times, and make sure every single part is back in the engine before firing it up. Probably didn't happen, but when the valve cover is off, make sure to plug holes with rags, the very last thing you need is a bolt or debris falling in there that nukes the engine.
Triple quadruple check, and turn it over again, and check the timing marks, and you'll be good to go.

-Mike
 

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ANY chance it's the tensioner? I was under the impression reseting the tensionor rest would be last AFTER handturning.
 

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ANY chance it's the tensioner? I was under the impression reseting the tensionor rest would be last AFTER handturning.
The tensioner won't affect the timing unless the chain is EXTREMELY loose.
 

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fair nuff
I was thinking more like binding might have been keeping the transmission from turning especially when the starter clutch was mentioned...but now that I think about it your 100% . the tensioner tensions. Binding is binding.
 

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The tensioner should only take up the slack on the return side (not driven) of the chain. It's there to limit the chain slap and resulting noise, rather than as a critical part of the can timing. The driven side has a specific length, as the distance between the exhaust cam and the crankshaft sprocket is fixed.

That's why you always have to turn the crank in the correct direction when checking clearances and reassembling. Keeps the timing of the valves' motions synchronized to the crankshaft. The tensioner should have no impact on that relationship.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just an update.

I managed to align the cams and chain again. I was able to rotate the crank manually several times without issues. Everything seemed to be lined up. I think part of the issue was the TDC moved as I was trying to get the chain back on and I placed it back at TDC before putting in the tensioner.

I remeasured the clearances and some seem slightly off (.01mm) from when I measured initially, but all still within spec.

Should I be in the clear or should I check anything else before assembling the rest and starting her up?

Appreciate the help so far.
 
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