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Discussion Starter #1
In a couple of weeks I will be making a ride from Arkansas to California for my grandmothers wake. I just have a couple of quick questions for y'all that have made long rides on your 636. When I did thus trip on my 500 it had a rear stand, I just wonder what is the best method of cleaning, lubing, and adjusting the chain on the 636 on the road? I know that during the summer the desert road will chew through my tires pretty well, how well do the stock Bridgestone Battkeaxes do on summer highway miles? Thanks for any suggestions.
 

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you can make a little kickplate thats say half in taller than from swingarm to floor ..mines is wood....then when bike is on stand if put little presure on bike rightside the rear wheel will lift slide plate between floor and swingarm near nut ...walla tire off ground so you can do tire or chain maintenance ......
or if you want they sell them
 

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Condolences on your loss.

Arkansas to CA is probably what, a 2 or 3 day road trip one way? I wouldn't worry about cleaning enroute. Being well hydrated, and well rested is more important by far. tire pressure, chain, oil level, coolant level.... all of that shouldn't be an issue on a 2014 for a trip like that. check it all before you hit the road, and that should suffice until you arrive.

When you get to the other end, it's easy enough to service the chain and rear wheel without stands.

Stand on the left side of the bike, with it in neutral resting on the side stand. With your left hand tug on the tail section, towards you -- while you are doing so the weight is much less on the back wheel; with your right hand you can spin the back wheel a bit less than 1/4 turn each time you make the tug.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Condolences on your loss.

Arkansas to CA is probably what, a 2 or 3 day road trip one way? I wouldn't worry about cleaning enroute. Being well hydrated, and well rested is more important by far. tire pressure, chain, oil level, coolant level.... all of that shouldn't be an issue on a 2014 for a trip like that. check it all before you hit the road, and that should suffice until you arrive.

When you get to the other end, it's easy enough to service the chain and rear wheel without stands.

Stand on the left side of the bike, with it in neutral resting on the side stand. With your left hand tug on the tail section, towards you -- while you are doing so the weight is much less on the back wheel; with your right hand you can spin the back wheel a bit less than 1/4 turn each time you make the tug.
It took me 2 ½ days to make it out there for Christmas last year, but I was more prepared than I am now. I had enough money for motels and I had stuff on my bike to help for a long trip, i.e. touring windscreen and a phone charger. I don't even have enough money to stop for a night. I will have to try and make it all the way without sleep if I can (I know dangerous as shit). The one good ting this time I will have more daylight hours and it won't be freezing cold, so I should be able to make it further than Albuquerque the first day of riding. Thank you for the condolences and for the advice.
 

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You're brave. And slightly stupid.
I'm pretty stupid (and proud of it), but you're something I would aspire to!

I've done a couple of long rides on the 6R:

http://zx6r.com/ride-reports/57824-hot-lanta.html

http://zx6r.com/ride-reports/61005-whimsical-rider.html

I did the exact same thing RJ mentioned with regard to lubing the chain. It is pretty easy to do once you figure it out.
I would think that the tires would be fine, as long as they've got a good bit of life in them still. How many miles do you have on them? How flat is the center?

Water is super important! If you already don't, get a tail bag for lugging stuff... I've never had the luxury of one, and kept wishing that I did. Backpacks suck when you're in a tuck and the wind tries to pull it off of you... your neck hurts like a b****!
 
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A camelback, with a drinking tube would almost be mandatory, in this day and age. Maybe with Gatorade every 2 or 3 fillups.

I once rode from San Diego to Portland OR, in one sitting.... about 14 hours up the Imperial Valley at 70+ in the middle of July. Long sleeve shirt to avoid sunburn, and just ripped up the road. Every time I stopped for gas, I would nail a 2 quart bottle of something to drink -- never had any sweat stains on my shirt, the wind blew all the moisture off my skin.

I believe in hydration.
 

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damn son, 2.5 straight days of riding is not something I would aspire to do nor suggest attempting. If no money for motels, why not reach out to some of the members on here for a halfway stop? that would REALLY decrease the risk of fatigue-caused accident. Another option is bring a small tent or sleeping bag and sleep at a camp site on the way. There must be something similar near the route. I don't see how you could ride for more than 14-16 hours straight without it becoming extremely dangerous. I'd put you up for the night if I lived anywhere on the way.

there's always a way. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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damn son, 2.5 straight hours of riding is not something I would aspire to do nor suggest attempting. If no money for motels, why not reach out to some of the members on here for a halfway stop? that would REALLY decrease the risk of fatigue-caused accident. Another option is bring a small tent or sleeping bag and sleep at a camp site on the way. There must be something similar near the route. I don't see how you could ride for more than 14-16 hours straight without it becoming extremely dangerous. I'd put you up for the night if I lived anywhere on the way.

there's always a way. Good luck and keep us posted.
Agreed w/ the notion of reaching out to the ZedExCommunity for a place to catch 20 winks.

Berserke81 made some great points regarding lube the chain. I do what he suggest, but I add a twist: I always lube it after I've been riding for a while, and the chain is hot. I use chain wax because it doesn't fling off. The difference that I do is keep the bike running in neutral. The chain will rotate do to inertia from the operating engine. Note: I always stand on the bike's Left side whilst tipping the bike into my thighs. I spray lube on both the outside & inside of the chain.

Others have mentioned the merits of the Camelback. I concur completely, but again w/a twist. H²O alone is not sufficient. When your metabolism is burning lots of fuel you deplete your electrolytes rapidly. These are responsible for neuro-functions. Thus, you become tired/dehydrated. Poor judgment ensues. In short you are dangerous to you and others. I blend a bottle of Gatorade & fruit juice (various V-8 juices) - you choose the flavours. Keep the mouth piece always tucked up in your helmet so you never have to search for it which is a distraction. Also, I do the trick of pouring H²O into my helmet to literally keep my brain cool.

I ALWAYS make up little ziplock bags with jerky in some, dried fruit/nuts in others; and protein bars. As much as possible stay away from candies, donuts, etc. Energy drinks are not long term energies - you get an initial pick-me-up, then get that sugar crash.

Ride smart. If you feel like your brain is fuzzy, and feel disoriented stop immediately, you are suffering from dehydration. You truly are the accident waiting to happen. Your brain needs protein & electrolytes (Na & K). Sounding odd, eat bananas, they are nature's perfect food (high in K). Get a cup of yogurt. Your eating habits on long trips can literally kill you... Or not. So eat often in small amounts, & take in fluids on a constant basis.

Godspeed to you lad, and condolences.
 

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Any chance you are on active duty?

If you are, hop a space A......

Leave the bike home.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You're brave. And slightly stupid.
I'm pretty stupid (and proud of it), but you're something I would aspire to!

I've done a couple of long rides on the 6R:

http://zx6r.com/ride-reports/57824-hot-lanta.html

http://zx6r.com/ride-reports/61005-whimsical-rider.html

I did the exact same thing RJ mentioned with regard to lubing the chain. It is pretty easy to do once you figure it out.
I would think that the tires would be fine, as long as they've got a good bit of life in them still. How many miles do you have on them? How flat is the center?

Water is super important! If you already don't, get a tail bag for lugging stuff... I've never had the luxury of one, and kept wishing that I did. Backpacks suck when you're in a tuck and the wind tries to pull it off of you... your neck hurts like a b****!
I only have 2300 miles on the bike so I'm hoping that the tires can make a 2000 mike trip, and the center still has a good curve to it so that's another plus.

When I made the trip last year I over packed had tail bags plus a giant packpack. Wore the backpack for the first day of riding then the second I just tied it to my tail bags. Killed my back and neck from being huntched over on that 500. Since this will be such a short trip I was thinking of just taking the backpack wrapped to the tail of the bike and my hydration bladder. Plus my tank bag stuffed like a pillow.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
damn son, 2.5 straight hours of riding is not something I would aspire to do nor suggest attempting. If no money for motels, why not reach out to some of the members on here for a halfway stop? that would REALLY decrease the risk of fatigue-caused accident. Another option is bring a small tent or sleeping bag and sleep at a camp site on the way. There must be something similar near the route. I don't see how you could ride for more than 14-16 hours straight without it becoming extremely dangerous. I'd put you up for the night if I lived anywhere on the way.

there's always a way. Good luck and keep us posted.
Since money is going to be tight thus time I was going to bring a sleeping bag with me and hopefully I can find a safe enough place to sleep for a coupe of hours. The last time I came out the first day was my longest riding day I rode for almost 18 hours before I stopped in Moriarty, NM. I would have tried to make it further than that but a coyote crossed in front of me and scared the shyte out of me.

A guy with a YouTube channel let me stay at his house the second night when I made it to Anaheim. I was beat dead tired and was worried about going down the grapevine around 11pm. Even though I know he probably sved my life I still felt like a piece of shyte asking someone I had never met before, for help.
 
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