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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This will be my first season racing. I have tried to ask local racers but no one wants to help. My question is, when your at the edge of your tires limits what is your bike doing to let you know your about to crash?
 

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I haven't pushed that far yet.. But as long as you have a good tire.. I have seen video and pictures of people dragging their bikes on the ground with sparks flying.. Then bring it back up and carry on.

I honestly dont think you really can outride good tires unless you break traction with your wrist. Or create a pivot point by forcing your bike into the ground :p

I'm sure someone will be able to chime in and give better info though..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If my bike were to start high siding that's the action. so what's your reaction? Same with a low side. What would you try to do to save it?
 

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I haven't pushed that far yet.. But as long as you have a good tire.. I have seen video and pictures of people dragging their bikes on the ground with sparks flying.. Then bring it back up and carry on.

I honestly dont think you really can outride good tires unless you break traction with your wrist. Or create a pivot point by forcing your bike into the ground :p

I'm sure someone will be able to chime in and give better info though..
That is very, very wrong. You can easily "outride" a good tire with things like bad form, bar input, and yes, throttle input.

If my bike were to start high siding that's the action. so what's your reaction? Same with a low side. What would you try to do to save it?
By the time you realize you are high siding, you have highsided. It happens so blindingly fast that you need not concern yourself with this at all. No joke.

Be smooth and predictable. Do not EVER chop the throttle (which is your normal panic response when something doesnt feel right), instead, stay on the gas and carry on with whatever you were doing. If it is a rear tire slide, stay at your current throttle and it will eventually catch up and you will carry on out of the turn. It is a matter of physics so as long as you do not do anything silly, it will correct itself.

If it is a front end push, again, do nothing. Stay at whatever throttle you were at. Do not alter the bike geometry by suddenly braking, moving in the saddle, etc.

Back to your original post however, each tire feels differently when you are at its limits. I like Pirelli because I can interpret the signals the tire is sending me best. Dunlops feel entirely different and I would swear that Bridgestones (tombstones?) give no warning at all. I doubt that is true but I cannot seem to find whatever it is that the tire is telling me.

Now that I covered all that, forget it all. Really. I mean you absolutely no disrespect and I wish you very well for your first race weekend but the simple truth is that you will be NOWHERE near the limits of traction if you are just starting out.

Focus instead on being light on the bars (no bar input) and proper braking techniques (dont stab at the brakes). Nearly every rookie crash I have ever seen has been caused by one or both of those two things.

You will have a million things running around in your head, and the limits of tire traction should not be one of them at this point in your racing career.

Relax, take a breath, and just focus on being smooth and having fun =)

Good luck!
 

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YMMV but when I have a rear slide I just counter steer and back off the throttle a smidgin. Spinning the rear is fun, and is usually nothing to worry about on a 600 most of the time. Losing the front is a whole other story, and requires a serious skillset to recover from reliably. When you start to feel the front go away I've noticed you will sometimes get a chatter or vibration through the bars before it lets go, but not always (depends on how stiff your tire carcass is, what brand, etc. dunlops and michelin are STIFF providing good feedback, or maybe too much feedback, pirelli and bridgestone are "squishy" providing much less feedback). When traction on the front tire goes you will notice the front bars get "light" (no more pressure, and your steering inputs will result in no change in direction) and it will begin to fold in the opposite direction of where you are steering into. When this happens you will have a VERY SMALL amount of time to react to recover before your ass hits the pavement. The most reliable way to save a front slide = GAS IT. This will transfer load from the front to the rear possibly giving your front end enough traction to prevent a crash. Under no circumstances should you chop the throttle, this will make the situation worse, and you will absolutely 100% will crash. I've also been able to just dig my knee into the ground and "prop" up the bike and managed to stay upright after front tucks...many ways to save a front tuck but whether or not you have the reaction time and frame of mind and training to execute a save is a different story. If you enter a turn WAY too hot you will run wide, miss your apex, start to lose the front, pick up the throttle, start to lose the rear, back off the throttle, and lose the front again (you get the picture, riding on the edge of traction requires throttle modulation to balance traction between the front and rear), best if you just sit up straight and run off into the grass if possible. This is an advanced topic, but for a new racer you will probably not be anywhere near the limits of traction unless you have a major fuck up, or are just extremely talented. ;)
 

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Cornerspin, American Supercamp, Colin Edwards Texas Tornado, Rich Oliver Mystery Camp, etc.

Pick one and attend.

Reading what it feels like and how to keep from busting your ass does NOTHING if you have never experienced one or both wheels sliding. Learning on mini bikes does translate to the big bikes.

Get the "oh shit" moments done on a mini bike so that you become comfortable with a sliding bike. You'll gain muscle memory at how to handle what the bike is doing. You'll be able mentally process stuff faster as a result. It's also cheaper and easier on equipment and the body to crash a mini vs a sport bike.

A TTR-125 is the best mod you can do for racing/general track riding.
 

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That is very, very wrong. You can easily "outride" a good tire with things like bad form, bar input, and yes, throttle input.

By the time you realize you are high siding, you have highsided. It happens so blindingly fast that you need not concern yourself with this at all. No joke.

Now that I covered all that, forget it all. Really. I mean you absolutely no disrespect and I wish you very well for your first race weekend but the simple truth is that you will be NOWHERE near the limits of traction if you are just starting out.

Nearly every rookie crash I have ever seen has been caused by one or both of those two things.

You will have a million things running around in your head, and the limits of tire traction should not be one of them at this point in your racing career.

Relax, take a breath, and just focus on being smooth and having fun =)

Good luck!
So true...I was an instructor last year new track riders and new racers. The majority of newbie crashes are due to target fixation and running of the track and falling in the grass or as painful just said, bad rider input. Be smooth and look where you want to go and you will be fine.
 
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