Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all you riders under 125 pounds, what type of suspension work have you done on your bike to accomodate your lighter than average rider weight? I'm asking because stock, on a bumpy road, it was as if I was riding a bucking horse. Now I've changed it so that the rear preload is all the way out and compression damping full soft front and rear. It feels better, but looking for other suggestions. Thoughts or ideas????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,793 Posts
have you set your sag? must likely you'll need to have your springs swapped out...but most japanese bikes are sprung for japanese men who weigh like 140lbs sopping wet.

after setting the sag with the preload, then its just a matter of the comp/rebound that gives you the feel you want. there's an article in the file vault that explains how to do this. :thumbup

-:banana
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,038 Posts
I'm also interested in opinions here (Thanks ZX6Girl!) as I'm barely over 100lbs and have nothing done to my suspension but a lot done to my back from the chiropractor...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,185 Posts
Yep, set sag first and back off on both rebound and compression a little. You'll likely need softer springs to get proper sag (compare laden to unladen sag to determin spring rate). Also you can plug your weight into the racetech spring rate calculator to get a ball park spring rate figure, in general their calculator is quite good.

For the damping, the stock components are quite good but would ideally be re-valved to suite your weight/spring rate. If you don't wanna spend the $$ on it now start by doing what you can with the clickers and run the fork oil level at the minimum setting - this won't affect damping but will lessen the air spring effect as the fork compresses, making it more linear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice. I figure I'll have to get new springs. I took some measurements and found that the sag in the front was fine, but there was too much sag in the rear. Typically sag in the rear is from 25 to 30 in the rear, 35 to 40 in the front. Set mine midway in those ranges, funnily enough had to add 1 and 1/2 turns preload in the rear. Went for a quick spin around the block, felt a little different. I'll have to go for a rip though the canyons to really tell. My husband is racing at Willow this weekend, so next weekend I'll be able to really test the diffrernces. Let you know!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,185 Posts
Sounds good, also check your unladen sag (difference between bike sitting level under its own weight and wheels off the ground), it should be around 10mm at each end. If its way more than that you need softer springs, if its way less than that you need stiffer springs (unlikely).

You can use sag to fine tune how the bike turns more rear/less front will typically make it a little more stable, slower to turn in and more likely to run wide/less likely to knife in. More front/less rear will typically make it less stable, quicker to turn in less likely to understeer and more likely to oversteer.

have fun
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top