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Discussion Starter #1
There's a legit suspension shop in my area (GP Suspension) where the guy that does the work is renown to be a bike suspension GOD. I'm debating whether I want to drop the $$ to get the suspension tuned for street riding.

If I was tracking my bike, it'd be a no brainer but I was wondering how many of you street riders have had your bikes' suspension professionally tuned and whether it made a real world difference.

Input please.
 

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Yeah dude, have a go yourself. I used the sportrider settings for my original forks and it was an improvement. I then used their suggestions for ZX12 setup (after i swapped the forks), but they were still rough as when I first installed them. I emailed a local suspension shop and they sent a spec sheet of how they would rebuild my forks and why. Using their reasons why I made some anjustments and now they're heaps better.
Do some research and work out which adjuster does what. Record your settings and then make some adjustments. Don't adjust it all at once - make a change, go for a ride, make another change, etc.
Once you find an overall setting you like go back to your original recorded settings and see what the difference is back to back
 

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I had mine done by Traxxion Dynamics. They did a awesome job. The stock suspension doesn even come close to touching the work that they did. I am also 210 lbs. so the stock suspension couldnt even be dialed in to suit me. And if you are considering doing some track days or even club racing it will pay off in the long run. I always hear guys preaching about power...power is nice, but it doesnt help you get through the turns faster than the other guy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the feedback.

The problem is, I don't have alot of the wrenches because I bought the bike used and the previous owner didn't have the toolkit. The cost of buying everything, while nice in the long run would be close to or exceed the $40 GP Suspension would charge for a professional tuning...

$40 sounds small but I can think of 1000 other tings to spend that money on so trying to gauge whether it's worth it for STREET riding
 

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Holy crap! Have I? Yes I have. I went to a trackday on July 3rd. For 30 USD a dude set me up by setting up basic settings for my weight and riding style (preload/rebound,etc). I've heard it will make a world of difference in ride over stock. I was skeptical it would make that big of a difference. The only thing I can say is "holy fuckin' shit!" Yes it makes a difference. Is it far improved? Yes! Get it done by a somebody that knows their stuff. It will feel like a completely different bike. I knew some people that had the basics down but this guy knew his stuff as if he'd been feeding off it for his whole life.

Get it done by a competent person and you will not be sorry.
 

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i think it really worth it, i dont have luck to have someone arround here that knows about that, no one knows here what am i talking about when i speak about, rebound or preload, go for it if u want to enjoy and have all your bikes potential in any circumstances like street
 

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i want to get my bike set up for my weight and riding style. i just havn't had the time, but i will get it done eventualy.
 

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Yeah dude, have a go yourself. I used the sportrider settings for my original forks and it was an improvement. I then used their suggestions for ZX12 setup (after i swapped the forks), but they were still rough as when I first installed them. I emailed a local suspension shop and they sent a spec sheet of how they would rebuild my forks and why. Using their reasons why I made some anjustments and now they're heaps better.
Do some research and work out which adjuster does what. Record your settings and then make some adjustments. Don't adjust it all at once - make a change, go for a ride, make another change, etc.
Once you find an overall setting you like go back to your original recorded settings and see what the difference is back to back
+1

This is what I do anyway. If you are roughly the same weight as a Jap test rider, i.e. 70 kg dripping wet then you can dial in the sussies to you. If you pull a few extra lbs the 180 then you may need to get your shocks reworked to handling your pudding.

TBH its not so complimacated. Both shocks have bound and rebound (compression and extension) Compression is when the shock is on its way up and is compressing and getting smaller, and obvioulsy extension is the reverse.

On most shockers you have a hard and soft setting. HArd lets less oil through the shims and holes, firming up the reaction. Slow lets more oil through softening up the movement.
Still with me?:boring

If you crash over every little bump and hole in the road your compression/bound is too firm. If the bike is diving to the bump stops on the brakes then your rebound/extension is to soft.

Play with the settings after noting down you stock/original settings and see what difference it makes.

I made all ny settings super soft and went for a ride. Then went super hard and rode out again so I could compare the riding feedback.
Small adjustment make small changes so from a setting you are happy with one or two clicks can make a difference.

There is also some good info in your bikes manual, in the file vault.
 

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Also if your doing ya own suspension wear the riding gear you normaly do cos if your in flip flops and shorts when ya do it and is all done and then ya go out in the leathers it will be a bit different to what ya liked before..
 

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Absolutely. Suspension should be one of the first things you look at on a bike, street or track. Only pay for "tuning" (meaning adjusting preload, comp and rebound) as a last resort though. Understanding suspension basics is something you should know/learn on a bike like this. You will need a buddy or two to help to just hold/measure...nothing difficult. But if you don't know anyone and really aren't comfortable w/ doing some reading...pay up.

You'll find plenty of info on the web & forums on how and what to do. Only caution is DON'T take suspension setting values and use them verbatim. Meaning nobody can tell you the "right" number of clicks for damping or "right" number of preload lines. Preload is based on your weight; you have to measure your bike and get it into a known good range. Damping is a bit subjective; you'll want to start at a baseline, adjust it a little at a time and ride to understand difference it makes.
 

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Absolutely. Suspension should be one of the first things you look at on a bike, street or track. Only pay for "tuning" (meaning adjusting preload, comp and rebound) as a last resort though. Understanding suspension basics is something you should know/learn on a bike like this. You will need a buddy or two to help to just hold/measure...nothing difficult. But if you don't know anyone and really aren't comfortable w/ doing some reading...pay up.

You'll find plenty of info on the web & forums on how and what to do. Only caution is DON'T take suspension setting values and use them verbatim. Meaning nobody can tell you the "right" number of clicks for damping or "right" number of preload lines. Preload is based on your weight; you have to measure your bike and get it into a known good range. Damping is a bit subjective; you'll want to start at a baseline, adjust it a little at a time and ride to understand difference it makes.
I like this info.

So true about subjectivity. ALso you will ride your bike in a different way to others so their settings will be personal to them.
Its not such a black art it just needs a little research. Simples
 
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