Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

Registered
Joined
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, this (hopefully) isn't the typical chain/sprocket question. I have already installed a -1/+2 Vortex steel, understanding that it increases acceleration while lowering top speed. My question is on the *tension* of the chain now, and if it should change over the factory setting? I'm on an 05 zx6r, and the manufacture slack setting is between 30-35mm. I'm wondering if, since I have now tightened the radius that the chain travels around the front speocket, is the 30-35mm slack allowance what I should stick with, or should it be tighter to keep contact with the sprocket, should it be looser to allow more play in travelling tighter radius? Would love to hear your feedback!
 

Registered
Joined
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Also, i apologize for the location of this thread, I didn't realize it was in the New Member Introductions, as I just woke up and am posting from my phone instead of computer! Please don't hate me! 馃槶馃槶馃槶
 

Registered
Joined
12,478 Posts
The slack required to make sure the chain doesn't bind up when the distance between the sprockets is greatest is going to remain really similar. The distance between the swing arm pivot, and the top of the rear sprocket isn't changing by very much at all.

When the suspension is fully compressed, all the way to the bump stop, the chain is connecting both sprockets at their greatest distance apart. That's what determines how much slack you have to have available at all times. You don't want the chain to stop the suspension from reaching full stroke..... that would make the chain do the spring's job, and it doesn't compress or stretch worth a darn.

I always run my chains at the maximum or greater slack numbers. It's the teeth engaging on the sprocket that do the work.... as long as the rollers seat all the way in the 'valley' between teeth, it's tight enough.

In your case, with the -1 +2, I presume you are using the OEM length chain, and as a result have had to move the rear wheel almost all the way to the front of the adjustable range. I'd personally make sure that you can get the maximum allowed slack, and call it a day.

New chain, new sprockets, you'll need to check the slack again a few times before it wears in. If you have ti too tight, the chain will wear out much more quickly due to the strain of being stretched by the swing arm. Remember that thing is a pry bar, almost 3' long. Lots of leverage. The pins in the chain are stronger than you'd think, but the side plates will suffer, and their holes will elongate which will create looseness.
 

Registered
Joined
29 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
@RJ2112 thanks for the comprehensive reply, that's exactly what i was looking for! I really appreciate you taking the time to answer. And yes, i am running OEM chain length, and I think the mechanic that installed my front sprocket set my chain too tight. I do know I have 5/8" from adjustment nut-to-adjustment nut. Ill check my tension tomorrow morning and set it a little looser. Thanks again!
 

Registered
Joined
12,478 Posts
The slack in the chain is normally measured with weight on the wheels, at the center of the span of 'free' chain. My rule of thumb is that I can typically touch the chain to the swing arm at one point on the bottom run of chain with it on the side stand. This is quite likely considerably more slack than the manual states...... I've never thrown a chain, or had damage to the swing arm, and my chains last well over 15K. (that's a cheap non OEM chain. With the OEM I get a whole lot closer to 25K)
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top