Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I can't find my answer anywhere so I'm gonn ask. I've slipped my bike into neutral a few times this summer when going from 1-2. It just feels like there is to much ankle movment between shifts. Any other gear is fine. So in order for me to get less ankle movement or to feel like I have to move the lever less in order to up shift I need to lower or raise the shift lever?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,222 Posts
Lower the lever, so that it is right at the tip of your boot when you want to shift, that way you don't have to twist your ankle as much, or switch to GP shift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,145 Posts
Ok I can't find my answer anywhere so I'm gonn ask. I've slipped my bike into neutral a few times this summer when going from 1-2. It just feels like there is to much ankle movment between shifts. Any other gear is fine. So in order for me to get less ankle movement or to feel like I have to move the lever less in order to up shift I need to lower or raise the shift lever?
Which way are you having to move your foot to get to the shifter?

Do you have to dip your toe to get under it? Do you have to pick your foot up off the peg to get high enough to shift?

That's what determines which way you need to adjust the shifter.... It's a very simple tweak; loosen the set nuts, and twist it each way until you find what you think is best.

Either way, the amount of travel the tip of the lever goes through is not going to change. All you can do is set where that range of motion has to occur. The shift from 1-2 is a greater distance than 2-3, 3-4, etc., because you are 'spanning' the extra space required for stopping the shift sequence in neutral.

Many motorcycles have a 'positive neutral finder'.... it is frequently more noticeable (and aggravating) if your clutch is not adjusted properly.

I'd also suggest you lubricate all the pivot points in your shift linkage. Making sure the lever can travel as freely as it is supposed to makes quite a bit of difference in shift quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When I shift I kinda need to move my foot and dip it down under the shifter. That's with steel toe boots too lol. Just ordered some riding shoes so I think I'll try lowering it a little.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,415 Posts
You do understand that all this will do is lower the point of engagement?

Unless there is something wrong with your shift linkage, nothing is going to shorten the distance you have to move your foot to change gears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,365 Posts
The distance of throw required to change gears can not be adjusted. Only the starting point of the shifter tip can be adjusted. You can try different aftermarket rearsets. Some of them have a different ratio built into the shift lever which will shorten the distance of throw.

What you need to change is the distance between the center of the pivot of the shift lever to the center of the point where the clevis of the shift rod attaches to it. The distance between points a and b on the image.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,323 Posts
You do understand that all this will do is lower the point of engagement?

Unless there is something wrong with your shift linkage, nothing is going to shorten the distance you have to move your foot to change gears.
This is not accurate because Math...

Wood craft shift levers have an adjustment on the toe piece. It offers six positions which change the distance of the throw of the shift lever.

Unless I failed at math (always possible someone should check it)

Edit: found one math fail it should have been 2theta/360 in the away I drew it. Oh, and it should be +delta r since my condition is delta r is negative.

Ey3
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,415 Posts
This is not accurate because Math...

Wood craft shift levers have an adjustment on the toe piece. It offers six positions which change the distance of the throw of the shift lever.

Unless I failed at math (always possible someone should check it)

Edit: found one math fail it should have been 2theta/360 in the away I drew it. Oh, and it should be +delta r since my condition is delta r is negative.

Ey3
A very good point, but I am basing my answer on the premise that the OP does not have adjustable rearsets. An assumption to be sure, but I would bet an accurate one or he likely wouldn't have asked the question.

Obviously the shorter the distance from the center of an arc, the less travel is required to complete the same degree of turn, at the cost of increased lever effort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,365 Posts
While moving the tip of the lever will accomplish shortening or lengthening the throw required to change gears, it is not the ideal way to do it. That adjustment on Woodcraft rearsets is to accommodate different sized feet. You can move the tip closer but it will become more and more difficult for you to get your foot in a comfortable position and still be able to operate the controls. Moving the clevis attachment point is the preferred way to adjust shift lever throw. Granted, it's not normally adjustable but different rearset manufactures use different ratios and almost all of them are a shorter throw than stock. You can also accomplish the same thing by changing the length of the arm attached to the gear selector shaft at the engine. Sometimes you can source longer or shorter arms off different models and year bikes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,323 Posts
It is my understanding that the woodcraft lever can be swapped for the oem.

Which would resolve op's question for ~70$.

Thought you were saying no way to do it at all. Sorry.

Ey3
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,323 Posts
While moving the tip of the lever will accomplish shortening or lengthening the throw required to change gears, it is not the ideal way to do it. That adjustment on Woodcraft rearsets is to accommodate different sized feet. You can move the tip closer but it will become more and more difficult for you to get your foot in a comfortable position and still be able to operate the controls. Moving the clevis attachment point is the preferred way to adjust shift lever throw. Granted, it's not normally adjustable but different rearset manufactures use different ratios and almost all of them are a shorter throw than stock. You can also accomplish the same thing by changing the length of the arm attached to the gear selector shaft at the engine. Sometimes you can source longer or shorter arms off different models and year bikes.
According to the instructions from woodcraft:
3) If you are using the OEM pedal, please skip to step 4. If you purchased a CFM shift pedal with your rearsets, remove the pedal assembly from the package. Assemble the CFM shift pedal using a Threadlocking compound on all bolts except the tip, this will be done in step 4. Bolt the hiem joint to the pedal (the lower hole makes the shifter work with less pedal travel, the upper hole makes for a longer throw – similar to stock).

Just saying.

Ey3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
805 Posts
Get proper boots.
That will do a lot, your feet probably moves 5mm inside the shoe that you have now, before the shoe moves the shifter. This makes it feel like you have to move your foot a yard to get it to shift. When you have your boots (with a good fit, there is no difference if its sidi, a-stars or dainese and cost you 1000$, good fit is all), set the shifter up so when you slide your foot forward to shift, the top of your toes hits the shifter a little bit, but still slides under, it shouldnt be a problem for you to get your foot under. Then learn to shift without using the clutch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,365 Posts
According to the instructions from woodcraft:
3) If you are using the OEM pedal, please skip to step 4. If you purchased a CFM shift pedal with your rearsets, remove the pedal assembly from the package. Assemble the CFM shift pedal using a Threadlocking compound on all bolts except the tip, this will be done in step 4. Bolt the hiem joint to the pedal (the lower hole makes the shifter work with less pedal travel, the upper hole makes for a longer throw – similar to stock).

Just saying.

Ey3
Ahh... I was looking at the tip adjustment. It is the adjustment I was referring to. They provide different points to attach the clevis for the shift rod to. I went to step 4 and didn't finish reading that step. Sorry.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top