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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2000 ZX6r that is supposed to run 120/65ZR17 up front and 180/55ZR17 in the rear. The previous owner put on a 120/70ZR17 Michelin Pilot Power in the front and the recommended size in the rear. The larger 120/70 seems to clear the fender fine, and the bike handles fine to me. But then again, I am a beginner and this is my first bike. So, I don't know any better about what constitute good handling and stability and the effects of going smaller or larger on the front tires.

I need new tires now and I am considering getting the Pilot Power 2CT, but they only come in 120/60 or 120/70 for the front. Should I get it one of these sizes (please tell me the pros and cons of each), or should I just get the regular Pilot Power in 120/65? I usually run my pressure at 35-38psi.

Thanks for your advice.
 

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Always a safe bet to run OEM sizes. No need to get jiggy with it.
 

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There is nothing wrong with running a 120/70 on a bike that came with a 120/65 so long as you lower the front end back down to compensate for the taller tire, otherwise you end up with a taller front end and poor handling.

120/70 gives you many more options for tires
 

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I have used all three sizes (120/60, 120/65 & 120/70), granted I have never ridden them immediately back-to-back, but have never felt any real difference on road or track. Get a 120/65 if there is one available in the tyre you're after (although they are getting quite rare now), otherwise you will be fine with a 120/70 (you'll have more options than a 120/60).

A 120/70 tyre is roughly 6mm taller than a 120/65, but personally I wouldn't worry too much about dropping the front end. Given that the front forks have about 120mm of travel, there are other variables which would slightly affect a bikes geometry, so it won't lead to poor handling if you don't alter the fork height.
 

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As above forget adjustments, i have a 99 G2 and run basically any matching pair I can get at a decent price. Granted I'm using the bike track only. If anything on the track is where it matters most as you are riding on the limit at at least one point throughout your sessions. I find after 2-3 sessions the tyres "wear" into their own natural shape based on how there ridden. I'm currently have a pair of sportmax qualifier 2's tha were brand new - 120/70 and 180/55. I've ran all sorts of different tyre size combos and after the first session you couldn't tell the difference.

My advice is find a good matching pair of tyres at the right price and buy them. As long a you don't go dramatic 5-10mm isn't going to make a noticeable difference unless you rode flat out on your way to work every day.
 

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I swapped 65 for 70, never looked back. Way more choice and I found they were cheaper!
 

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I don't try to drag knee on my daily commute, but I notice the handling difference when I move my forks a few mm up or down. Without the right drop, the bike wants to track toward the outside of my lane when I am on a multi lane onramp.
 

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60/65/70 series makes little difference for the the level of riding you are doing. When you get to advanced session track day level then you can start talking about tire profiles meaning something.

For now, buy and use whatever is readily available for the $.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone ! Based on all your inputs, I feel a lot more comfortable now with going with the 120/70 2CTs. Happy riding!
 
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