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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
ARC was also the first place I heard a definition of carving a line through a corner.

When the suspension is right, when the power is right, when you don’t have to adjust your line, change acceleration & the simply flow through the corner….. you have carved that turn. When you set up your line so you flow from one to the next with no wasted motions….. you may carve a number in succession. This is when you see folk that can drag fingers on pavement, skim their knee pucks along their chosen path. There’s basically no steering input or anything else. Just the flow.

That can be really slow, really fast, or anywhere in between.

You can easily see when someone is hacking a corner up making multiple changes in any number of things relating to executing the corner. Their chosen line becomes a series of choppy lines as every ‘correction’ is applied. Smooth looks slow, smooth is fast.
 

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Another thing I will mention…. Most passengers are your worst enemy trying to ride a bike.
Not sure about that statement. I've had passengers that can ride and work with you. I also find it makes you a lot smoother as a rider - you have to be due to all that weight being back there and you don't want to make them uncomfortable. Having said that a ZX6R is not the place for a pillion unless you're freaking desperate. There are better bikes for these purposes. And yes (from experience), I've had a punch in the ribs from an ex as she hated being so cramped and up high.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Maybe in locations where motorcycles are a mainstream mode of transportation, the number of knowledgeable passengers is greater…. Here in the US, it is still true that you are much more likely to be in an accident with other vehicles, where that operator has no relatives or friends that ride.

‘I didn’t see the bike’ happens a lot more with people who don’t have any relation to motorcycles.
 

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These are great thoughts -- it's hard to know where to draw the line -- I used to ride with my daughter as passenger, always with full gear.

Now she rides the N400 herself with me behind her on the ZX-6R, with helmet intercoms -- we don't go above 35mph, though.

I'm not sure if that is better or worse, but I did not want her to be uneducated going off to college and then being passenger with some cute guy driving (I'd rather him be the passenger!)...

The same thoughts go thru my head rock climbing or even bicycling on public roads -- heck or even driving for recreation...

How much risk is OK, and can I even really explain the possible consequences to a 17yo?

I don't know the answer, but I do believe I kept the angels very busy as a teenager myself long ago -- I assume they are still up to the task... :)
This is something I have struggled with. My little boy had a motorcycle before he could ride a bicycle. Same with driving a manual I’d sit him on my lap and let him drive. My train of thought is the more experience they have while you are in charge of safety the Better they will be when you are not around. I see so many young adults coming in the store to get their first bike and they don’t have a clue. And everyone says. “I always wanted one but my parents wouldn't allow it”. Now they are grown with their own money and they go nuts.
Years ago the old man started offering free riding courses and it’s the only way we will sell to first time bike owners. It’s a case by case tho. Some guys we have traded with their family and know them and what not. But we have turned down our fair share of young kids coming in and wanting to jump right to a sport bike. We even have a program where if you buy a 250 or 400 whatever beginner bike and keep it for a year and we do the service we allow you 90% of what you paid when you come back to trade it in. Assuming it’s not trashed. Having a kids death on us just isn’t worth it.

but whith kids your happy they follow your footsteps. But it wouldn’t bother me if my son was into ballet and crossstitching instead of motorcycles. Well it might bother me a little bit lol.
 

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My train of thought is the more experience they have while you are in charge of safety the Better they will be when you are not around.
+1 on that. I used the same approach with mine for cars/motorcycles/guns/alcohol and other things that need some judgment and restraint to survive the learning experience. It's about the most you can do to prepare them and guide them while they still will listen some.


Mark
 

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+1 on that. I used the same approach with mine for cars/motorcycles/guns/alcohol and other things that need some judgment and restraint to survive the learning experience. It's about the most you can do to prepare them and guide them while they still will listen some.


Mark
when my boy turned 15 I got him a 883 when he got his motorcycle license. (Tennessee you can get then at 15 600cc or smaller) and I wasn’t getting him a sport bike so we cheated and got a 883. But no joke our first street ride out he was behind me I topped this hill and this huge dog ran out and snapped at me. I looked back and he hit that sucker dead on and went airborne on that Harley lol. He stuck it tho. Was very sketchy but he kept it on the road and on the wheels. I feel pretty confident if he hadn’t grown up on dirtbikes he would have reacted and crashed instead of just bracing and riding it out. Oh and dog seemed somewhat fine. It hobbled away lol. I almost wrecked looking back to make sure he made it through it. Pretty sure that’s the day I started loosing my hair lol
 
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