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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a set of Ohlins 25mm cartridges installed several track days back, and Performance Cycleworx did a full adjustment front and rear.
Made the bike noticeably more stable when shifting body weight or shifting in the corners.
Didn't anticipate changes to the rear, but now have a chance to get the matching TTX shock at a really good price, and am wondering if it's worth the extra money.
I'm feeling instability when shifting my weight again - I know I am going faster now and I'm shifting my weight more and sometimes abruptly when I realize it's not right. I just don't know how to evaluate if the shock would improve this or anything else about the bike.
I DO know the cartridges made improvements in areas where I didn't even realize improvements could be made, if that makes sense.
Opinions?
 

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If it were my money, I would upgrade the rear shock before the forks. The rear shock is more important...Yes, get the TTX. Just make sure it is sprung for you.
 

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I agree with OK here, the rear shock is the real weak point of the suspension on the 09+ and most people look to bin that first. The stock BPF isn't that bad and really doesn't show it's flaws till you get up into Advanced/race pace.

At this point just buy the TTX you already have the cartridges...or you could just sell me the cartridges for cheap since I just picked up a TTX...:devious
 

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To make a long story short.. Buy it

The zx6r shocks have been horrible since 05 (outside of the RR) I would have done that before the front as mentioned above.
 

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Is an ohlins ttx worth it?

What I really mean is:

I was planning on getting the right springs and setting the sag correctly for me this winter. I'm a fairly low level rider on the track, but I really want to become better.

I have alot to learn before I'd "need" anything like this. What I am wondering is whether I'd run into any sort of benefit anytime soon. If so, I could save myself some bucks by just doing it right the first time.

If that's the case, I'll just get the stock shock set up right and save the money.
 

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Is an ohlins ttx worth it?

What I really mean is:

I was planning on getting the right springs and setting the sag correctly for me this winter. I'm a fairly low level rider on the track, but I really want to become better.

I have alot to learn before I'd "need" anything like this. What I am wondering is whether I'd run into any sort of benefit anytime soon. If so, I could save myself some bucks by just doing it right the first time.

If that's the case, I'll just get the stock shock set up right and save the money.
put the money of ohlin's into track time and tires.
 

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put the money of ohlin's into track time and tires.
Point taken, but that's not really what I was asking. If I didn't have the resources to do track days also, I wouldn't be considering a new shock :).

I guess the answer is no, it doesn't become a dramatic difference until I have much more skill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I was surprised when I got the bike how much difference it made just having the track day suspension guy set up the stock suspension.
Then I was surprised again after I had the cartridges put in... it made only a slight difference the first session, after which Performance Cycleworx fully adjusted every aspect of the suspension, taking 3X as long and doing 3X the work that the first guy did. After they finished, the bike was noticeably more stable.
Am taking in the info others are offering about the shock, and am leaning toward a purchase.
By the way, it only cost $40 to have the local track day people do these adjustments on the stock gear.
The adjustments after the fork cartridges were installed were included as part of the installation.
 

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Someone correct me if I am talking out of my ass but....

Suspension wise, just respring that shit if all you are doing are TD's and not at a fast I, A group pace, or racing. I was considering throwing on carts. and a racing shock this winter but 1) I am cheap 2) I don't see myself heading down the financial blackhole that is racing anytime soon 3) I'm just not fast enough yet....

With that said, respring all around, revalve kit in the shock, quality tires and tire warmers, and zoom. I haven't pushed the bike hard enough to have a lot of slides and shit to tell me I need suspension work and I get enough feedback from it right now.

Same for all the other go fast shit when you are B grouping it up. SAVE YOUR MONEY
 

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Point taken, but that's not really what I was asking. If I didn't have the resources to do track days also, I wouldn't be considering a new shock :).

I guess the answer is no, it doesn't become a dramatic difference until I have much more skill.
What I am saying is...

ride the shit outta your bike stock so when you finally upgrade, you can appreciate it more and have the skillset to push the new shit hard as well.
 

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Same for all the other go fast shit when you are B grouping it up. SAVE YOUR MONEY
LOL ok got it. I had pretty much made up my mind to just get the springs right anyway. I didn't mean to be disagreeable, I was just curious.

I just like the idea of having the best tools, if it makes sense.

What I am saying is...

ride the shit outta your bike stock so when you finally upgrade, you can appreciate it more and have the skillset to push the new shit hard as well.
Haha yes, this makes sense to me.
 

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LOL ok got it. I had pretty much made up my mind to just get the springs right anyway. I didn't mean to be disagreeable, I was just curious.

I just like the idea of having the best tools, if it makes sense.



Haha yes, this makes sense to me.
It's all good, just giving my view point.

I'll leave snap-on to the pro's. I'll show up with my Harbor Freight stuff :)

EDIT: I was lurking on the GT-R forums last week. Someone said a track n00b taking out their GT-R to learn on is like a pilot earning his wings on an UAV. Same concept to me in my reformed mind of thought.
 

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Yes and no, I agree it's likely not needed, but revalving and a spring on a stock shock puts you half way to a new shock and 2/3 of a used ohlins or Penske, suspension is hands down best bang for buck in my opinion.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I guess I'll find out since I bought the shock. Hope to do a track day at Jennings the last weekend of this year and see how it does.
 

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Depending on the miles on your rear shock, I would at least have it serviced if you were not going to upgrade.

IMO I would look at a Penske dbl adjustable from Kenny Martin at MRP Motorsports or Traxxion Dynamics for a rear shock. Ask when the TTX was last serviced and if the spring is setup for your weight. The new may be cheaper than a TTX especially if the TTX needs servicing. I just sent my triple adj 46 Ohlins shock to OHLINS USA and with shipping both ways, a new spring and various hard internal parts it was about 300.00. So I spent 450 for an older Ohlins, 300 for servicing so 750 total....A new Penske dbl adj will be around 850

Yes you could spend the money on track time and tires, but I was eating tires as the shock could no longer do its' job properly with rebound ability and the money spent on a decent shock help with rear tire life. Additionally, f you decide to sell it in the future, you can get a good amount of your money back selling it to another forum member or track guy.

OkayH has some good points, but at the same time I rode a stock suspension bike, then rode a similar bike with good suspension, then rode mine again and wondered how I managed the times I did. If you can afford it, do it.
 
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