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I'm new to riding and just purchased my first motorcycle 2 days ago. 2001 Kawasaki ZX6R in black and yellow. Took it for a ride for the first time today "as my learning phase" and it was incredibly fun. Looking forward to the many years of motorcycling
 

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I'm new to riding and just purchased my first motorcycle 2 days ago. 2001 Kawasaki ZX6R in black and yellow. Took it for a ride for the first time today "as my learning phase" and it was incredibly fun. Looking forward to the many years of motorcycling
Welcome. You'll hear a lot of advice shortly with regard to gear and training. There is a reason for that advice. Asphalt is equivelent to a belt sander with about a 40 grit belt on it...... and it's doing less than 15 MPH running WFO. Shredding gear is much less of a problem than shredding skin and fingers and toes. Not to mention teeth, etc.

Training will impart the knowledge that impact with a stationary object at 25 MPH is the same speed that you would attain jumping out of a 2nd story window. Best to avoid that, if at all possible.

Motorcycles are indeed fun. I've been riding them off and on since I was 12 years old and have the scars to prove it.

If you want to ride for a long time, start small and slow, get training, and wear your gear. You may hear advice that says 'never mind all of that'; and there is I am sure at least one person who could make that argument stand up. But there is a saying amongst pilots that is just as applicible to motorcycles..... "There are old pilots, and there are bold pilots. There are no old, bold, pilots."

Motorcycles are a constant stream of decisions all relating to risk management. The better you can take in the information that is available to you far enough in advance of when you need it, the less risk you face. The balance point of risk/reward is DIRECTLY related to your rate of forward progress. When (not if) you get behind the processing wave, your risk of a misfortune goes up.... the higher your speed, the less time you have, and the greater the potential for serious consequence.

Good vision, good hearing, comfortable environment, few distractions..... all of that will allow you to survive for many years of riding. The most important peice of safety gear you have, is between your ears.

Use it.
 

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Hi! Welcome!

I may come back and edit after my training today, but for now everything RJ said + Google twist of the wrist two. I would encourage watching and reading. Several times.

Ride safe!

Ey3
 

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Thanks for the advice guys! My wife makes sure I wear all of my gear! I just don't have over the ankle shoes. But I plan on taking the beginner and intermediate course soon when one opens up. And yes, Greer sc. Dunno why it didn't put SC. Ey3, I'll make sure to watch it sometime tonight.
 

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Thanks for the advice guys! My wife makes sure I wear all of my gear! I just don't have over the ankle shoes. But I plan on taking the beginner and intermediate course soon when one opens up. And yes, Greer sc. Dunno why it didn't put SC. Ey3, I'll make sure to watch it sometime tonight.
I was somewhat short on time when I wrote up my thoughts on gear, and training.... I do apologize if that came across as rough as it sounds to me today.

The message doesn't change, regardless.... this is in fact one of the more dangerous hobbies you can become involved in. Training will teach you that 85% or more of your braking power is in the front. It will possibly show you how to get 100% of that power without skidding the front and losing control.

Self taught riders (me included) are typically uncomfortable at very low speeds.... the bike is not contributing to stability at that point through gyroscopic forces. At speeds greater than walking pace, the bike helps you keep it upright. Fear of falling over is something we all learn while we are still in diapers -- but that is exacly how motorcycles turn. They fall 'into' the turn. Every time. No exceptions.

At very slow speeds the changes needed to lean the bike in the direction you want to go are tiny, and are masked by everything else. This is also due in part to the change in center of gravity is actually dictated by the center of mass of the combination of the rider, and the bike's natural center of gravity. Moving your head out of alignment with the tires may be enough for the whole package to tilt to one side......

Counter steering accelerates the leaning process, by twisting the bike on it's long axis -- you steer the contact patches of the tires out from under the center of mass, so the bike falls into the turn. The tires have to be to the 'outside' of the direction you want to go, so you steer 'counter' to the direction you intend to turn. Push right, go right.
 

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I was somewhat short on time when I wrote up my thoughts on gear, and training.... I do apologize if that came across as rough as it sounds to me today.

The message doesn't change, regardless.... this is in fact one of the more dangerous hobbies you can become involved in. Training will teach you that 85% or more of your braking power is in the front. It will possibly show you how to get 100% of that power without skidding the front and losing control.

Self taught riders (me included) are typically uncomfortable at very low speeds.... the bike is not contributing to stability at that point through gyroscopic forces. At speeds greater than walking pace, the bike helps you keep it upright. Fear of falling over is something we all learn while we are still in diapers -- but that is exacly how motorcycles turn. They fall 'into' the turn. Every time. No exceptions.

At very slow speeds the changes needed to lean the bike in the direction you want to go are tiny, and are masked by everything else. This is also due in part to the change in center of gravity is actually dictated by the center of mass of the combination of the rider, and the bike's natural center of gravity. Moving your head out of alignment with the tires may be enough for the whole package to tilt to one side......

Counter steering accelerates the leaning process, by twisting the bike on it's long axis -- you steer the contact patches of the tires out from under the center of mass, so the bike falls into the turn. The tires have to be to the 'outside' of the direction you want to go, so you steer 'counter' to the direction you intend to turn. Push right, go right.
Didn't sound rough at all. I can handle and like constructive criticism. I've noticed as I have been riding the last couple of days, counter steering becomes an instant instinct and I don't have to think about. Great advice given to me was to look where you want to go and go there. Don't look at your tires or directly in front of you. The really tricky part I'm coming across is when I turn right from a dead stop for example, I have to think about turning because you don't counter steer and just kinda steer into it but as speed picks up you counter steer. That might sound jumbled up but I'm constantly practicing it. Also, I only have my permit and have been practicing the DMV test and man it's difficult to stay in that box!
 

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Thanks for the advice guys! My wife makes sure I wear all of my gear! I just don't have over the ankle shoes. But I plan on taking the beginner and intermediate course soon when one opens up. And yes, Greer sc. Dunno why it didn't put SC. Ey3, I'll make sure to watch it sometime tonight.
I spent my fair time in Greer. Went to HS @ blueridge and then USC-upstate before joining the USAF. Just keep on practicing and taking it slow. Watch that video...take the class...start slow and you'll be having fun in no time.
 

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I spent my fair time in Greer. Went to HS @ blueridge and then USC-upstate before joining the USAF. Just keep on practicing and taking it slow. Watch that video...take the class...start slow and you'll be having fun in no time.
What class was you? I graduated Blue Ridge in 2011
 
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