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Hi I’m new to the forum. I picked up a 2003 636 about 3 months ago and never had any issues with it up until last week. So I replaced the seat cover as the old seat was destroyed. Everything was fine on a 2 hour long ride. Once I got home I noticed a white smoke that smelled like burning electrical coming from the bike. I took the tank off and discovered this. I attached photos of the seat and Frame as well as it seems something is happening with that as well.
 

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Can't really see what your refering to with the Frame & Seat due to wear marks, But that connection is the one from the Stator (Generator) that got hot and started to melt, Not uncommon on Bikes in general.
It already looks to be to far gone to save so you need to decide on a method of making good a connection between the 3 Phase wires.

Lithium Battery may have played a part in the demise but tbh I don't know enough about retrofitting this type of power cell to be confidant it has.
 

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OP, since you are going to spend some time 'under the hood', I would suggest you purchase some dielectric grease and flood every quick disconnect electrical connector you have access to. Corrosion of the contacts inside those plastic covers is quite common as bikes age. The plastic actually traps moisture, which is then caught in a sort of midget green house. Opening the connector, scrapes off the corrosion where the pins actually make contact. Cycling them in and out a few times will scrape away more of the surface corrosion and increase the likelihood you will have good electrical contact. Corrosion is almost always resistive in nature, which means as current passes through it, the connection gets hot --- one of the highest current flow situations on the bike is between the alternator and the rectifier/regulator, as all power comes from that source to be consumed elsewhere.

Current x Voltage = Wattage.
Current x Resistance = Voltage.

If your circuit has to have a certain amount of power to do a job, it will draw more current to do so, to whatever extent is possible/available. As current goes up to overcome the added resistance of the corrosion, the effect is pronounced...

The third power formula that applies here is (current x current) x resistance = wattage. I squared, R as it is most often stated.

Keeping resistance low, results in keeping unwanted heating in those connectors low.

Dielectric grease will provide a barrier to the formation of corrosion, because it blocks oxygen from getting to the freshly scraped off contacts the complete the circuit inside those connectors.
 

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I had to do this a couple of times. I feel like that specific connector eventually will do this. There is a good chance you can fix this before having to replace parts.

..but only if you do it correctly... you need to remove the connector and all overheated wire on either side of the connector. the wire starts to developed resistance as it deteriorates for many reasons..

resistance=heat=cooked wire and connectors.

This can happen with no faulty components...also faulty components can cause this AND/OR hasten the process.
 

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2 wheels. 1 engine. Squid pilot😂
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It's a simple two pin connection that's easy to replace with an aftermarket sealed connection like the one below.

I use these for my VTR1000 build for some custom lighting and also for my car build for various custom wiring like gauges and lighting.

If you know how to solder and use heat shrink or polyolefin as it's also called then you'll be good to replace that burnt connection.
They're 18 gauge wire which should hold the juice needed for that stator connection.

Good luck and don't fret as it's quite fixable. 🤙👍
 

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It’s worth remembering that multi strand wire acts like a wick, due to the significant surface area offered by all the discrete wire strands. Capillary action will carry anything that was liquified some distance under any insulation….. solder with rosin provides flux to liquify, and there is acid present to etch off any surface oxidation so the solder will stick. End result is some small amount of acid adjacent to the points soldered together. Hence, another contributor to metallic fatigue in the wiring beside a soldered connection.

A flood recovery, car or auto, will have long term effects as that moisture continues to corrode inside every connection and in the wiring with incomplete insulation.

This is why it is recommended that you should never use a pressure washer under the hood, or on a bike. It’s fair to say that the two environments are comparable.
 

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2 wheels. 1 engine. Squid pilot😂
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It’s worth remembering that multi strand wire acts like a wick, due to the significant surface area offered by all the discrete wire strands. Capillary action will carry anything that was liquified some distance under any insulation….. solder with rosin provides flux to liquify, and there is acid present to etch off any surface oxidation so the solder will stick. End result is some small amount of acid adjacent to the points soldered together. Hence, another contributor to metallic fatigue in the wiring beside a soldered connection.
True and yes the soldered connection itself will last longer than the wire connecting the soldered con action.

But it is THE best route to take over any other connection I can think of unless you start getting into your MilSpec connectors that aren't a cost effective repair unless it's a race bike/ car where the best reliable connection will be needed.

I worked 3 years as a subcontractor for Northrop Grumman Ship Systems setting up several of their combat systems on the DDG destroyers.
Most every connection to the critical circuits were crimped and we're the best connection available.

All other connections were soldered and heat shrink as per mil spec standards and those envirinments are some of the harshest out at sea.

I never use a butt connection. Ever. 🤢🤮
If I use a crimp connection I solder the crimp to ensure the wire does not slip out of the crimp.

For the same 2 pin connection shown a good solder job will last the life of the bike if using an inline twist, soldered, and heat shrink. 👍😁
 

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^^^ We’ve traveled in similar circles. I am now designated as Engineering Manager for the Electromagnetic Effects Technical Warrant Holder for Navy ships and submarines. That’s every form of RF, including magnetic effects through directed energy.

While I cannot say with certainty that I have been ultimately responsible for approving your work, I’m pretty sure we’ve worked to the same goals.
 
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