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Discussion Starter #1
Well i just got my new 2015 ZX-6R 30th Anniversary Edition a few weeks ago and i am in the process of breaking it in! Is the wrist cramping normal? Does it go away? Do you get used to it? I was on a Ninja 300 before this bike so i never really had the aggressive seating position "feeling" before. Thanks in advance and ride safe everyone!
 

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You need to take your weight off the bars, and 'carry' it with your legs and torso. Get the balls of your feet on the pegs, and squeeze the tank with your knees. That's plenty of bracing, so you can relax the grip on the bars and quit trying to do push ups while you are riding. You should be able to flap your elbows without moving the bars, or your body at any time.
 

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yes it is normal, no it doesnt go away if you keep your weight on your hands, like above post said, there is a different way to riding sportbikes, your 300 had more of a relaxed sport touring stance compared to your new zx6r.
 

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Alright i'll give it a go thanks for the advice!
Yes what RJ2112 said. Stay relaxed on the clip ons. Support the bike with your core and legs. If you are doing it right you should be able to take your left arm off the bike in turns at speed and wave to people, touch the ground and so on. Don't try this until you are confident in your ability to control your ride. You're are using your legs and core to support the bike, you will see very little input will be needed on the clip ons to lean correctly. When riding on the freeway same thing applies. Keep your weight off your wrists/arms. You should be able to ride for hours like that. Enjoy your new ride. She is PURDY!!!!:yes
 

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Never mind they said it all.

Well maybe the one that hit me between the eyes.
Gym time.
Nothing ever managed to get me to the gym expect my Ninja.
The wrists were one thing, the legs was the other.
Do some track day's you understand what I'm saying.

Core and legs. What fun.
 

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Welcome! Nice bike..

If you feel the handlebars are cramped, you can try doing this minor "mod" to push the bars out a little, you will notice the difference, and if you don't like it, just put them back to standard. If you rather not make marks on the fork, you can always use removable paint or tape to mark the original positions before adjustments.

Skip to 2:13.
 

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Pretty normal for a super sport. These bikes are designed for performance, not comfort.

Try using your legs to grip the tank which will allow you to take some weight off the bars.

Also, if your right wrist is getting uncomfortable due to the long Kawi throttle, you could always throw a shorter throw aftermarket throttle on their like a MotionPro. I hated how long the OEM throttle was!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Alright thanks for all the tips i won't be modding the bike as of right now. I like the way everything feels i just need to be open to the different riding style and get my weight off the wrists.
 

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Alright thanks for all the tips i won't be modding the bike as of right now. I like the way everything feels i just need to be open to the different riding style and get my weight off the wrists.
Yes, most will have some cramping in the wrist and numbness in the fingers. It's almost inevitable due to the nature of all SS bikes. Gripping the tank with the knees and using your abdominal muscles will help take weight off your wrists and hopefully you're not leaning full weight onto them with locked elbows either.

GL and enjoy riding
 

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Yes, most will have some cramping in the wrist and numbness in the fingers. It's almost inevitable due to the nature of all SS bikes. Gripping the tank with the knees and using your abdominal muscles will help take weight off your wrists and hopefully you're not leaning full weight onto them with locked elbows either.

GL and enjoy riding
FWIW, it's not your abs that hold you up. It's your lower back, spinal erectors, and to a degree your serrators and obliques. So your core, for sure, but not your abs. Wrong side.
 

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They aren't meant for riding around on the street so it will never be comfortable. I die when I ride on the street, my wrists cramp, my arms hurt, my back is death but on the track I feel perfectly fine.
You can't force yourself to sit the whole time you ride around on the street so yes your wrist will hurt until you buy a more comfortable machine :)

IMO you don't really need to take ALL the weight off the front on the street... you aren't asking a lot of the bike when riding it so the likeliness that your input is going to cause you to crash is very slim.
 

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They aren't meant for riding around on the street so it will never be comfortable. I die when I ride on the street, my wrists cramp, my arms hurt, my back is death but on the track I feel perfectly fine.
You can't force yourself to sit the whole time you ride around on the street so yes your wrist will hurt until you buy a more comfortable machine :)

IMO you don't really need to take ALL the weight off the front on the street... you aren't asking a lot of the bike when riding it so the likeliness that your input is going to cause you to crash is very slim.
The alternate side of the story is that I ONLY ride mine on the street, 30+ min each way every day, and I have never had problems with wrist pain. Sometimes my shoulders get tight, but each person is different.
 

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Proper body position helps reduce the aches, but sheer rider's will, can make one brave through/lane split/weaving heavy/slow traffic. I've seen sportsbike riders do this as a daily thing, the worst is the slow crawling part in jams, and since we have zero law about lane split, you can weave your way between vehicles and stuff. Fun and easy on mopeds but challenging especially if you are hunched over on a sportsbike. I salute those guys. My commute doesn't go through any really bad jams, so it's fine for me.

As a lazy person that doesn't exercise I find riding sportsbike a good exercise while you enjoy the ride.. You strengthen your core/back/neck/arms/thighs while you ride.
 

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I am a new rider as well and quickly found out that, you can't ride a sport bike like a Schwinn. The wrong way, is to sit comfortably and lean forward allowing most of your upper body weight to rest directly on your hands/wrists. This gets old, tiring, and painful very fast.

This evening I attempted something "new" (for me) in that, I squeezed in my knees more than before onto the tank and leaned in and down over the tank as close as possible (tuck) and I relaxed my arms down to my sides. It was a bit awkward at first trying to shift like that, but it certainly felt better on my wrists. You may start to feel a strain in your neck from your body being lower which forces you to lift your head/chin higher.
 

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I used to squeeze my knees onto the tank on the highway like I was going to fall off. That didn't work so well for rides up into the mountains 70 miles away. Could barely walk when I got home.

Your best bet is to get used to riding with your legs relaxed, knees resting against the tank, balls of your feet on the pegs and arms relaxed on the grips (like the above noted, you should be able to wave your bingo arms without upsetting the bike in the least). Your back will hurt for X number of rides until you get used to it.

On long highway rides with no traffic, I lift my right ankle/calf (with the ball of my foot still on the peg) so that my right knee is higher up on the tank. Then I rest my right elbow on my knee and cruise.

Positioning while riding aggressively is another story captured on another thread.

jimundascores
 
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