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2012 Chevy Camaro
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3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!

I just recently bought a brand new 21 KRT Edition and so far I'm happy with it. Still working through the 600 mile break in so I've not been able to get into it yet. Also idk how Kawasaki expects you to stay at or below 4k rpms for the first 250 miles lol.

Anyways, I'm upgrading from. A 2012 Ninja 250 and this bike is definitely a big jump in power but I'm already looking into mods for the bike once it's broken in.

Definitely wanting to replace the stock muffler/exhaust. I'm looking at the Akrapovic slip on, but I'm also considering the Akrapovic full exhaust system. I know either way I will need a Servo Buddy. If I go down the full exhaust route, I know the bike will need tuned and that's the part I'm struggling with is trying to find a tuner I can trust that is somewhat local. I live near Myrtle Beach, SC for reference.

With that said, what other mods would be recommended to go with if I do decide to go full exhaust and dyno tune?

Thanks!
 

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2019 Ninja 400, 2020 Ninja zx6r
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Congratulations. The mod are up to you. Your probably going to need, plug/delete the o2 sensor. Pair valve delete and a full exhaust system is really worth if your going to track it. Weight saving and all but, if it's for street use and canyon carving than a slip-on is probably better. Aftermarket airfilter but just be careful it doesn't filter like the oem one. Lets for dust in. If your going that route, remember to clean it after your 2k-3k oil service. Another option is change out the sprocket. You can send out your ecu to get it flash. Some form of protection for the bike is probably good. All the stuff i mentioned are purely what I would do to my bike. This is your bike, enjoy it. 馃槈
 

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2012 Chevy Camaro
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3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Congratulations. The mod are up to you. Your probably going to need, plug/delete the o2 sensor. Pair valve delete and a full exhaust system is really worth if your going to track it. Weight saving and all but, if it's for street use and canyon carving than a slip-on is probably better. Aftermarket airfilter but just be careful it doesn't filter like the oem one. Lets for dust in. If your going that route, remember to clean it after your 2k-3k oil service. Another option is change out the sprocket. You can send out your ecu to get it flash. Some form of protection for the bike is probably good. All the stuff i mentioned are purely what I would do to my bike. This is your bike, enjoy it. 馃槈
Got any recommendations for air filter? I was thinking K&N. And what do you mean by "some form of protection"?
 

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Have you invested in training/track time? I'd be doing that over mods.
 
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Registered
2012 Chevy Camaro
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3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Have you invested in training/track time? I'd be doing that over mods.
I have not. I've been riding street bikes for 12 years now. Not saying that counts as training or anything. With that said, I'm not sure where I would even be able to do training at. And as for track time, Road Atlanta is a goal of mine to go do. But it's a 6 hour trip there sadly.
 

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I have not. I've been riding street bikes for 12 years now. Not saying that counts as training or anything. With that said, I'm not sure where I would even be able to do training at. And as for track time, Road Atlanta is a goal of mine to go do. But it's a 6 hour trip there sadly.
If you haven't already been through the MSF offerings, I would consider taking a class from them. They should be available within an hour or so of wherever you may be. Still on a parking lot closed course environment. Top speeds less than 30 MPH.

The experienced rider course would put you through all the basic drills on your own bike and get you 'eyes on' with a trained instructor..... worth doing.

The Sport bike rider's course involves more skills based training and moves from basic braking and swerving to how to effectively stop when cornering and techniques for braking etc. while street riding. More worth doing, and actually reasonably fun.

I have not been able to get back to Oregon to do the Team Oregon ARC (advanced riders course) since 2006. Team Oregon spun off from MSF, due to philosophical differences as I understood it. That one was quite fun and I learned a lot. It's done on a go-kart track, which is effectively a single lane paved road course. Hairpins, chicanes, decreasing radius turns, elevation changes..... still had maximum speed limits, but you actually work the controls in the manner they are intended to be used, in an environment that is similar to actual track conditions. While learning how to survive the sorts of things that happen when you're riding on the street in a spirited manner.

I would say overall, that all of us can use some outside review on occasion of what we are doing and how that may be improved. Coming from an outsider who is formally trained makes it a lot less confrontational and more readily accepted. If, you can check your ego at the door.

v/r,
 
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