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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m working on installing manual switches for the radiator fan, headlights and taillight on a 2016 zx6. Radiator fan is pretty simple, but the headlight/brake light is taking more time. I’m not well versed in wiring, but I’m taking my time so I don’t cause any problems/shorts. I think the simplest place to wire in a taillight kill switch would be near the taillight connector under the seat (picture below). Would it work to cut it and wire in a switch there?
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As for the headlights I’m thinking of wiring it into the headlight circuit relay, photos below for reference (cut wires 1 and 3 and make a switch for them) I’ve seen someone wire a fan switch near the relay box as well. Any help/tips would be nice, keep your opinions to yourselves pls

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You don’t get one without the other, so I’ll wish you luck instead.
 

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Im just wondering why u would want a manual turn off switch for your taillight. 🤔

Sounds like youre up to no good.
 

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Or to escape the cops!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If anyone is interested I did the brake light switch. Photos below. It’s super simple and easy, I will wire the headlight/city lights to the same switch in the same fashion. Fan will be a separate switch.

I used a Light up led switch. Wiring: cut the black ground cable on the taillight side of the black plug (right hand side of pic), the “red +” wire goes to the positive terminal on the battery, the yellow marked cable is labeled “acc” and feeds power to the light, the light blue marked wire goes back into the wiring harness as a ground. DO NOT MISMATCH THE GROUND AND ACC WIRES, you will set fire to your bike.


The + wire running from the switch to battery is to power the led in the switch. Non led switches will only have 2 prongs and don’t need battery power.
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If anyone is interested I did the brake light switch. Photos below. It’s super simple and easy, I will wire the headlight/city lights to the same switch in the same fashion. Fan will be a separate switch.

I used a Light up led switch. Wiring: cut the black ground cable on the taillight side of the black plug (right hand side of pic), the “red +” wire goes to the positive terminal on the battery, the yellow marked cable is labeled “acc” and feeds power to the light, the light blue marked wire goes back into the wiring harness as a ground. DO NOT MISMATCH THE GROUND AND ACC WIRES, you will set fire to your bike.


The + wire running from the switch to battery is to power the led in the switch. Non led switches will only have 2 prongs and don’t need battery power.
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Cool. Not sure how u plan on wiring the headlight and radiator fan switches. But those do use a lot more power than your LED taillight, so make sure whatever switches u are using will be able to handle it without burning up.

I would rather have a switch which interrupts the relay, rather than an inline switch which just cuts out power.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Cool. Not sure how u plan on wiring the headlight and radiator fan switches. But those do use a lot more power than your LED taillight, so make sure whatever switches u are using will be able to handle it without burning up.

I would rather have a switch which interrupts the relay, rather than an inline switch which just cuts out power.
Yeah I’ll check the manual for the specs, I’m not much of an electrician so I gotta learn more before I get the rest of it setup properly.
 

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For headlights, wire up 2 relays and use the signal wires for high and low beams (blue and red) for 12v trigger on relays. Switches on the 12v out. I have one for my HID projectors. Well, for the ballasts. The ballasts use the low beam (blue I think) for the relays to the igniters.

Basically, any switch is ok downstream from relay. Never ok otherwise unless you’re using to interrupt a ground. Even then, I’ve only used one to interrupt a ground to a relayed circuit. Like I used one for the ground of an aircraft safety switch that I had to flip to THEN be able to use front and rear compressors for axle lockers in a jeep.

Anyway, you need 4 relays for what you want to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For headlights, wire up 2 relays and use the signal wires for high and low beams (blue and red) for 12v trigger on relays. Switches on the 12v out. I have one for my HID projectors. Well, for the ballasts. The ballasts use the low beam (blue I think) for the relays to the igniters.

Basically, any switch is ok downstream from relay. Never ok otherwise unless you’re using to interrupt a ground. Even then, I’ve only used one to interrupt a ground to a relayed circuit. Like I used one for the ground of an aircraft safety switch that I had to flip to THEN be able to use front and rear compressors for axle lockers in a jeep.

Anyway, you need 4 relays for what you want to do.
When you say wiring up relays, do you mean in the way explained in this VIDEO? But with a relay that can handle more power.
 

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When you say wiring up relays, do you mean in the way explained in this VIDEO? But with a relay that can handle more power.
Relays are REALLY simple once it “clicks” for you. Pun intended.

Pins 30 and 85 need to get bridged. That’s done by bridging 86 and 87.
Pin 30 is a new fused wire from battery.
Pin 85 is a new wire that goes to any proper ground (eg. Engine lug, negative battery terminal or any metal that will show continuity with negative terminal of battery with a multimeter set to ohms test beep, or ohms test measurement)
Pin 86 is the original power (eg. blue or red headlamp wire, yellow/green (?) taillight wire) from whatever device you’d now like to switch. This is the wire where the actual switch will go.

Pin 87 is new power wire to device you ultimately want to wire (eg. Headlamp). Could technically put switch here as well. But for installation standards, switch goes upstream of relay...

Keep in mind that device you want to power STILL RETAINS it’s original ground. You’re simply sending overly complicated, but well protected, 12v power to same device.

The problem with putting a switch directly on the headlamp 12v feed is that all the power consumption (and fluctuations) will travel through the switch. Also, initial inrush current when you flip something on that’s 20amps is a lot more than people think. There are some burly switches out there, but most will degrade and can become a hazard. With a relay, 30 to 85 circuit handles all the inrush current, all the juice and fluctuations and is built to do so sometimes hundreds of thousands of times. 86/87 is a small electromagnetic switch circuit that only requires/asks system for mere milliamperes of power to bridge and give 30/85 continuity. This very small power requirement flows through even the shittiest of switches without drama and without incident. Hence you can put whatever cool flashy switch you want. 3 prong lighted switch will need a wire from a fused 12v wire (safe to tap an existing 5-10amp circuit).

I think... 😉

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