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Discussion Starter #1
Hello so I'm pretty new to motorcycles and I have a 2004 kawasaki zx6r and absolutely love it, however it has a manual idle and I usually have it at its highest but realized I am killing my gas. When I am at a red light my rpm is at 3000 RPMs and a friend told me that's WAY to high. But when I lower my idle my bike seems to want to die out, and also shifting feels rough at lower idle. Can someone help me out on what seems to be the problem please and possible solutions!
 

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Clean your injectors, check your fuel filter and air filter.. Get the service manual. Grab a friend, some beverages and take your time.
 

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Ok, the little lever on your left handle bar switch should be used only to warm your bike up, after that you should be pushing it forward so that it's no longer raising the idle. It's kinda like a choke feature on a carbureted bike, only yours is fuel injected. When that lever is pushed all the way forward your bike should idle around 1300-1500 RPM. If it wants to drop lower than that you have another idle adjuster on the left side of the bike just below the rider seat, kinda behind your left knee when your sitting on the bike, it's a little black nob. you need to turn that nob clockwise until your resting idle is in spec. Spec is technically 1300 give or take 50, but I've always preferred 1500-1700 on my bikes, but that's a different discussion.
An easy way for you to get your idle in spec would be to warm you bike up with that lever pulled forward, then once it's warmed up start turning the knob until the idle bumps up a bit. At that point you can push your lever forward and the idle should stay where it was at b/c the other adjuster is holding it. Then turn the idle down slowly until you've reached a more suitable RPM. Or if it dies before you get to 1300 then at least we'll know there's some other issue and we can trouble shoot from there.
 

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Ok, the little lever on your left handle bar switch should be used only to warm your bike up, after that you should be pushing it forward so that it's no longer raising the idle. It's kinda like a choke feature on a carbureted bike, only yours is fuel injected. When that lever is pushed all the way forward your bike should idle around 1300-1500 RPM. If it wants to drop lower than that you have another idle adjuster on the left side of the bike just below the rider seat, kinda behind your left knee when your sitting on the bike, it's a little black nob. you need to turn that nob clockwise until your resting idle is in spec. Spec is technically 1300 give or take 50, but I've always preferred 1500-1700 on my bikes, but that's a different discussion.
An easy way for you to get your idle in spec would be to warm you bike up with that lever pulled forward, then once it's warmed up start turning the knob until the idle bumps up a bit. At that point you can push your lever forward and the idle should stay where it was at b/c the other adjuster is holding it. Then turn the idle down slowly until you've reached a more suitable RPM. Or if it dies before you get to 1300 then at least we'll know there's some other issue and we can trouble shoot from there.
+1
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you so much man, I will play with all that and come back to you and let you know how it turns out
 

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Ok, the little lever on your left handle bar switch should be used only to warm your bike up, after that you should be pushing it forward so that it's no longer raising the idle. It's kinda like a choke feature on a carbureted bike, only yours is fuel injected. When that lever is pushed all the way forward your bike should idle around 1300-1500 RPM. If it wants to drop lower than that you have another idle adjuster on the left side of the bike just below the rider seat, kinda behind your left knee when your sitting on the bike, it's a little black nob. you need to turn that nob clockwise until your resting idle is in spec. Spec is technically 1300 give or take 50, but I've always preferred 1500-1700 on my bikes, but that's a different discussion.
An easy way for you to get your idle in spec would be to warm you bike up with that lever pulled forward, then once it's warmed up start turning the knob until the idle bumps up a bit. At that point you can push your lever forward and the idle should stay where it was at b/c the other adjuster is holding it. Then turn the idle down slowly until you've reached a more suitable RPM. Or if it dies before you get to 1300 then at least we'll know there's some other issue and we can trouble shoot from there.
In regards to the little black knob, clockwise makes the rpm go higher or lower?
 

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In regards to the little black knob, clockwise makes the rpm go higher or lower?
I am of a differing opinion, I believe clockwise rotation on the adjustment knob will cause the idle to increase. I believe this because the adjustment knob simply turns a mini "bolt" which acts as a stopper for your throttle. By turning the knob the bolt is "tightented" which causes it to move further through its mounting point. This means it sticks out towards the throttle wheel further holding the throttle in a more open position.

Regardless of why, Ey3l45h makes a good point, just start turning it and you'll hear the difference, you're not gonna hurt anything
 
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I am of a differing opinion, I believe clockwise rotation on the adjustment knob will cause the idle to increase. I believe this because the adjustment knob simply turns a mini "bolt" which acts as a stopper for your throttle. By turning the knob the bolt is "tightented" which causes it to move further through its mounting point. This means it sticks out towards the throttle wheel further holding the throttle in a more open position.

Regardless of why, Ey3l45h makes a good point, just start turning it and you'll hear the difference, you're not gonna hurt anything
Yes. works that way on my bike anyway. & with your reasoning, on all bikes I would have to say.
 

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Yes sorry, I wasn't very clear on that point, clockwise is higher, counterclockwise is lower.
 
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