Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Alright I think I really f***** up. My front tire didn't seem in alignment so I was loosening up some of the bolts toward the front of my bike, all except for the top triple clamp bolts. I was loosening up the last bolt, the steering stem bolt. I wasn't able to get it finger loose so I kept on loosening it and suddenly the whole front of the bike fell forward and the bolt completely came off, a the steering stem fell down.
Is there anyway I can fix this? Is this something I should take to the shop?
Is it bad to leave the bike like this for now because no shops are open right now.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
If you have a triple tree stand you can fix everything right up. I think you left the bottom triple clamp bolts loose and without the yoke nut it dropped the forks together with the clamp.
 

·
Director of Moderation
Joined
·
9,940 Posts
The "boat" came off?? What boat?? lol

So let's recap first....you're supporting the bike on a front stand I assume, or nothing at all with the tire on the ground. Then for some reason you took the steering stem nut off, and loosened the bolts from the triple clamps. What did you expect to happen? lol

All that stuff slid down on the forks by doing that, and if it wasn't for the forks being at an angle, by design, it would go even farther down. Why did you take the steering stem nut off? And why are you not supporting the bike with a front stand with a pin that lifts from the bottom triple clamp? That's what you need whenever doing work on the front end of the bike, like removing forks, or servicing steering bearings, etc. Get yourself a stand like that put it on and lift the front end. Then you can put it all back together. Or figure out another way to support the front of the bike without touching the forks, like lifting it from the frame somehow.

What exactly were you hoping to achieve by doing all of that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
If you have a triple tree stand you can fix everything right up. I think you left the bottom triple clamp bolts loose and without the yoke nut it dropped the forks together with the clamp.
Thanks for the reply. I have a front stand, but it isn't a triple tree stand. I have a friend that might have one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The "boat" came off?? What boat?? lol

So let's recap first....you're supporting the bike on a front stand I assume, or nothing at all with the tire on the ground. Then for some reason you took the steering stem nut off, and loosened the bolts from the triple clamps. What did you expect to happen? lol

All that stuff slid down on the forks by doing that, and if it wasn't for the forks being at an angle, by design, it would go even farther down. Why did you take the steering stem nut off? And why are you not supporting the bike with a front stand with a pin that lifts from the bottom triple clamp? That's what you need whenever doing work on the front end of the bike, like removing forks, or servicing steering bearings, etc. Get yourself a stand like that put it on and lift the front end. Then you can put it all back together. Or figure out another way to support the front of the bike without touching the forks, like lifting it from the frame somehow.

What exactly were you hoping to achieve by doing all of that?
I was trying to realign the forks-
Right now the bike is not on a front stand. It is only on a back stand, just like in the youtube video.
I didn't intentionally take the steering stem nut off. I was loosening it and before I realized it, it came all the way off.
 

·
Director of Moderation
Joined
·
9,940 Posts
There is so much wrong shit in that video. Don't follow that. The red flag was when he's just eye-balling stuff and thinking it's not aligned, while looking at the front wheel in relation to a fairing...a freakin fairing! lol

If wheels aren't aligned on a motorcycle, it usually means something is bent...either frame, forks, triple tree, axle, or wheel, etc. Neither of which can be simply fixed by loosening up a few bolts and re-tightening everything.

Get yourself a front stand and lift it from the bottom triple clamp. Then I would take the wheel off to make it easier to lift the forks back through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Thanks for the reply. I have a front stand, but it isn't a triple tree stand. I have a friend that might have one.
Well to start with I would definitely phone a friend and ask for the triple tree stand to at least take the load of some components. Then proceed to reinstall the forks and so forth to the manual specifications.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,062 Posts
If you have a rear wheel stand to brace the back of the bike, you can elevate the front of the chassis and sort out what has happened. A floor jack is enough to lift the front, if the back is braced.

The bike should not be hurt if it has to sit on the collapsed front end..... you might end up damaging the front fender, there is some chance that the wheel could be touching the radiator -- that might damage it. The fork legs are too strong to be damaged by slipping in the clamps.... the wheel is too strong as well.

Personally, I'm encouraged that you are taking this on. Mistakes happen, but that's how any of us learn whether we want to admit that or not. Failure is a part of progress.

My dad was fond of saying in his later years --- "but I still have all my fingers and toes" :) He was a wizard mechanic. A backyard engineer. A handyman that would attempt anything at all. He taught me it was okay to be bad at something; because that meant I had a lot of opportunity to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Failing availability of a headlift stand, a floor jack or shop crane could be used to fix this. Actually, I have a headlift stand, and I'd probably still just use my shop crane. Just lift the front end of the frame back up and put the steerer nut back on. I used my shop crane when I did this sort of work on my project bike because it was the safest option. Failing availability of any of those, three or four big burly friends might be able to just he-man the bike back up high enough to get the nut on. The trick will be finding them something to grab on to, as there are fairings in the way of most of the structure.

Check the integrity of the radiator, exhaust pipes and front tire when you're done. The weight of the bike is resting on something now that it's not supposed to, and while it's probably fine, discovering you have a cut tire or punctured radiator would be a bad time if you discovered this while you were doing what the bike does best.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top