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Throttle cables route from the handle to the small diameter hole in the frame on the CLUTCH side, then once inside the frame they route to the right to the fitting on the carb. When I install the air box, I usually push the throttle cables back and forth so they settle into position.

With respect all your airbox/carb/block-off plate questions, I have done it all. I have the block-off plates with the capped-off airbox, and deleted the solenoid (called the "airbox mod"). This coming weekend I'll take some detailed pictures so you can verify what you have; I've run my setup for a few years with zero issues.
 

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To actually answer the thread's title question..

RAM Air is a means of increasing static pressure inside your airbox via forward facing air ducts, allowing air to speed into the airbox with little restriction. As your vehicle speeds up, more air from outside is forced into the airbox via the ducts (the ducts contain dynamic air pressure as the air moves through them), increasing the airbox's static air pressure when the air is essentially compressed inside of it prior to being sequenced into the carb and then the cylinder with atomized fuel as the intake valve opens.

Essentially, your ram air acts as a forced induction system, increasing engine power and efficiency as speed increases. The stock EVAP system takes this pressure when off-throttle and dumps it into the exhaust via the smog plates, helping burn off excess hydrocarbons and lessoning the impact on the "eNvIoRmEnT" (marginally). Think of the stock EVAP system as a turbo "waste gate". Without it (when installing smog block-off plates), the static pressure in the airbox remains a function of forward road speed (dynamic pressure) and once you crack open the throttle again, there is no lag (think turbo boost lag).

Questions?
 

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Wow, now that is some response time. I feel like I should be paying a monthly subscription 😅

Okay brilliant! I've plugged the line from the airbox but I plugged it at the end of the hose because I knew I'd lose the hose if I plugged it further up at first so I will ping the hose off tonight and move my plug up right to the underside of the airbox. I will also give the hose a good check for cracks!

She's coming together nicely. Would you happen to know how the throttle cables are routed? I realise I am off-topic here and have asked the question in my build thread Here but just on the off chance.

I feel a lot more chilled now going forward, thanks for the help, much appreciated.
Do you have the oem kawasaki service manual........... there is a section for hose and cable routing

and tons of other useful information to help you
 
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Do you have the oem kawasaki service manual........... there is a section for hose and cable routing

and tons of other useful information to help you
I’ve got a Haynes manual. But not the OEM service manual. I did try to find a copy online but could only get the owners manual and that’s hardly got anything in it.
I don’t think there is a section for cables routing in the Haynes but I’ll have a look this evening 👍
 

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I’ve got a Haynes manual. But not the OEM service manual. I did try to find a copy online but could only get the owners manual and that’s hardly got anything in it.
I don’t think there is a section for cables routing in the Haynes but I’ll have a look this evening 👍
Get the OEM manual here: Master Service Manual Thread


Mark
 

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Throttle cables route from the handle to the small diameter hole in the frame on the CLUTCH side, then once inside the frame they route to the right to the fitting on the carb. When I install the air box, I usually push the throttle cables back and forth so they settle into position.

With respect all your airbox/carb/block-off plate questions, I have done it all. I have the block-off plates with the capped-off airbox, and deleted the solenoid (called the "airbox mod"). This coming weekend I'll take some detailed pictures so you can verify what you have; I've run my setup for a few years with zero issues.
Clutch side as in the lever not the actual clutch plates side? I've got them sat pretty nicely atm but they are really old and I did see new ones on Wemoto for like £40. I will take mine back off and oil them and see if that makes me feel better. They feel okay.. just ahhh she is going to be doing trackdays and peace of mind and all that.

Thanks man pictures are always super helpful, keen to learn where this solenoid is and what it does for the airbox or Kleen-air thing.

That link to the service manuals that @mmattockx sent is great, amazing detail in the diagrams so it would be great to delete/remove some weight from the wiring harness!
 
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