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Discussion Starter #1
I put most of the information in the video description on Youtube.
Evaluate, learn from my bad choices & mistakes. Most of all, wear gear.
Shit happens, and it can happen really fast. :coocoo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmMy7FoF_ho
 

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Hope everyone is okay and you can get the bike repaired.

I've made the same mistake, and crashed. There are always way too many variables on the road (gravel, ice, cars, animals, unexpected stops, traffic going over the line . . . etc). Now I keep higher speeds at the track, and ride reasonably (or within condition limits) on the street, not that I'm implying that you aren't but rather that accidents are costly and preventable by a simple decrease in speed.
 

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I put most of the information in the video description on Youtube.
Evaluate, learn from my bad choices & mistakes. Most of all, wear gear.
Shit happens, and it can happen really fast. :coocoo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CmMy7FoF_ho
Fixed for mobile users. Insurance is gonna get pissed if they keep having to buy you motorcycles lol. At least you're okay.
 

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1. Glad you are ok

2. Because you dedicated an entire paragraph to not knowing what the problem was under the video...you just jumped on the rear brake and gave it way too much. Go to a (clean) parking lot and just practice emergency braking with the front brake (from like 20-30 mph). Just keep doing it till you can romp on the front brake into baby stoppies as you come to a stop and be comfortable with it. No one does this. Everyone should. Might save your life one day because I didn't see any reason you couldn't have come to a stop behind that car in front without leaving your lane.
 

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^^ The trick with getting the most out of the front is to wait to apply full pressure, until weight transfer has completed. You can't just stab the brake.... you have to squeeze it to full pressure, over most of a second to get the bike to compress the fork and maximize traction on the front wheel.
 

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^^ The trick with getting the most out of the front is to wait to apply full pressure, until weight transfer has completed. You can't just stab the brake.... you have to squeeze it to full pressure, over most of a second to get the bike to compress the fork and maximize traction on the front wheel.
Yup and that's probably 50% of what you are learning when you practice emergency braking. The initial grab needs to be fast+smooth and when you first try it, trying to grab it fast will be jerky. It takes practice to grab the brakes quickly but smoothly. Plus, whatever the initial pressure you are applying the brakes to has to just be ingrained into muscle memory. 1 second is pretty fast to get to maximum braking, if you have time to think about squeezing it more or less you are taking too long to get there. Then once you pass that stage it is just modulating the pressure from there to keep it at maximum braking. Which is the other half of the learning curve.

I found it! This is a good article with some charts for illistration
Riding Skill Series: Braking Potential | Sport Rider
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Honest question here Goatfather - how much time do you spend practicing emergency stops?
Honestly I have not dedicated practice to braking in about 2 years. Except for the occasional scrub here and there when riding. So as soon as I read the above comments I just nodded my head and frowned at myself. Definitely a good set of points brought up. Gives me plenty to reflect on.
 

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Honestly I have not dedicated practice to braking in about 2 years. Except for the occasional scrub here and there when riding. So as soon as I read the above comments I just nodded my head and frowned at myself. Definitely a good set of points brought up. Gives me plenty to reflect on.
I did a similar thing, spent a couple years riding and never practiced an emergency stop. Had a close call one day then went to a parking lot to practice the next. It was hugely educational for me and I just remember thinking holy crap I can brake so much harder than I thought!
 

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Honestly I have not dedicated practice to braking in about 2 years. Except for the occasional scrub here and there when riding. So as soon as I read the above comments I just nodded my head and frowned at myself. Definitely a good set of points brought up. Gives me plenty to reflect on.
Professional development would be ideal....... get an expert to observe and advise........
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you guys for all of the skillset encouragements, and kind words. I definitely need to work on just basic exercises again. I let myself get lazy and sitting down honestly thinking about it, had I been better prepared I would have been able to stop. I hope this video serves as a learning tool for someone.

Once I heal, back on two, back to the weekend grind. I wish my nearest track wasn't 5-6hrs away.
 

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Thank you guys for all of the skillset encouragements, and kind words. I definitely need to work on just basic exercises again. I let myself get lazy and sitting down honestly thinking about it, had I been better prepared I would have been able to stop. I hope this video serves as a learning tool for someone.

Once I heal, back on two, back to the weekend grind. I wish my nearest track wasn't 5-6hrs away.
Best thing to realize is that you wont always have a clear path on the other half of the road. You can always correct mistakes, but remember that had there been a car in that lane you may not have the chance. I've had a lot of close calls, and we learn from those, but always remember that you control your fate only to a small extent, but that small extent is the difference between a fun ride on the bike, or a silent ride in an ambulance.
 

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The upper practical limit for speed on the street: Never ride faster than you can stop, in the space that you can see.

This has to take into account your reaction speed as well.

It may be less practical in heavy traffic, but you should always monitor the situation as far ahead of your present position as possible...... to the far horizon, if at all possible. With enough time on your side, very small changes can yield big results. The less time you have, the more drastic the action.

It's important to understand how close to the edge of traction you already are, before you make a sudden demand for more.

The classic example is the statistic form the Hurt study in LA.... the speed at impact for the VAST majority of motorcycle/auto impacts was less than 30 MPH. If you think about it, that means the rider was going about 30 MPH faster, than he could stop.
 
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