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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone. I'll make this short and sweet. I got a short notice deployment and had less than a day to pack, get my gear and leave. I left in July and with time constrants didn't "Winterize" my bike. I have a 2011 ZX6R and its covered and sitting in my garage. This is my first bike and it has about 8k miles on it after a season and half. I did cover it and my garage isn't really heated. Im from the east coast and I know this could be extremely bad but what should my steps be on returning home? Oil change, and I know I'll probably need a new battery. Should I drain the gas? If so should I put some gas and treatment in there? I know this makes me sound like a huge noob but I didn't have much time. Thanks in advance for everyone's help! -B
 

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Change the oil and gas, get a new battery. Put a couple drops of machine oil in the cylinder heads for extra precaution. Refill with new gas and you should be good.
 

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maybe some seafoam or other fuel injector / fuel system cleaner in the tank *before* you change the oil. If you do it after, you'll get that shit in your oil (well, may get that shit in your oil), and that's not good.

probably want to just drain whatever gas was in there and put fresh gas in too.
 

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I would also be aware of the critters that might have crawled into your exhaust or intake and made nests.

Biggest thing is the fuel has almost certainly gotten bad in the injector rail itself. Probably won't want to start for the 1st 10-20 seconds as you clear all that out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone. I changed my oil before, but mechanically don't know much more about the bike. I'll probably take it to the local shop and let them do it. I just don't want them to make me pay for unnecessary things. Again thanks everyone!
 
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You are doing everything correctly so far. Just run it for 15 minutes after the fuel stabilizer is added, and make sure the tank is topped off to keep moisture out. While you are gone, keep the bike on a stand, and the front tire under a piece of foam board. Get an incandescent light bulb shop light (~40 watts is fine) and a cover, and put the shop light on the floor, under the the crankcase before you leave.
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Make sure oil level is correct, lube the chain and check the air pressure in the tires. Me? I'd overinflate them about ~5 pounds to compensate for the temps, and the normal gradual leakage. If you take it to a dealer, insist that they lube the cables.
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Finally, wash and wax the bike.
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Cover? First an old cotton sheet, and then a "cover". Make sure that cover hangs all the way to the floor, and otherwise is absolutely secure, but the bottom is open under the crankcase for the "light" heater.
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Been this route from 1969 through the mid '80's when deployed or on station in strange far off places with nasty winters....
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Make sure/ ask whomever is home, or at the residence, to turn that light on (and leave it on...) whenever the temps are below freezing.
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Me? I'd remove the battery, clean it, and put it inside on a piece of foam board or wood. When you return, put it on a trickle charger for a couple days, but have a spare, new battery ready.
 

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I always find it funny when people give too much advice at once and the person asking for help gets scared and takes the bike to the shop. Haha
 

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Thanks everyone. I changed my oil before, but mechanically don't know much more about the bike. I'll probably take it to the local shop and let them do it. I just don't want them to make me pay for unnecessary things. Again thanks everyone!
I wouldn't take it to the shop, thats already an unneeded expense. I've seen others bikes sit a lot longer in a lot worse conditions and be fine after a little maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I always find it funny when people give too much advice at once and the person asking for help gets scared and takes the bike to the shop. Haha
I always find it funny when people do their own maintance and end up causing more work for themselves or the shop they end up taking it too. This is my $10,000 toy that I had to save up for, nothing funny about wanting to properply take care of it. Don't come at me side ways CRAB
 

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Draining gas, doing an oil change, and swapping a battery are pretty easy. Seriously, they are a 0.5/6 on the six-pack scale of difficulty.
 

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Right, but if he doesn't feel comfortable doing it, that increases the chances he'll fuck something up.

If you don't feel comfortable working on something, then have someone else do the work that does feel comfortable working on it.

No reason to give someone flak for not wanting to screw up something they paid a bunch of money for.

On the other hand, I think it's a good thing to learn about how the bike works and how to work on stuff for a few reasons.
 

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Right, but if he doesn't feel comfortable doing it, that increases the chances he'll fuck something up.

If you don't feel comfortable working on something, then have someone else do the work that does feel comfortable working on it.

No reason to give someone flak for not wanting to screw up something they paid a bunch of money for.

On the other hand, I think it's a good thing to learn about how the bike works and how to work on stuff for a few reasons.
Tank of gas: $12
Seafoam: $8
Syphon: $3
New Battery: $50
Oil filter and oil: $30

vs.

Labor cost: $80-90/hour and probably 2 hours of shop time required
Materials: see above
shop fees: few more bucks....

Yup, Gimme that 6 pack and a couple hours to figure crap out :)


"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Right, but if he doesn't feel comfortable doing it, that increases the chances he'll fuck something up.

If you don't feel comfortable working on something, then have someone else do the work that does feel comfortable working on it.

No reason to give someone flak for not wanting to screw up something they paid a bunch of money for.

On the other hand, I think it's a good thing to learn about how the bike works and how to work on stuff for a few reasons.
It's not that I am not inclined on working on cars/bikes. I just have never worked on my bike before. Its nothing like my VW.


Tank of gas: $12
Seafoam: $8
Syphon: $3
New Battery: $50
Oil filter and oil: $30

vs.

Labor cost: $80-90/hour and probably 2 hours of shop time required
Materials: see above
shop fees: few more bucks....

Yup, Gimme that 6 pack and a couple hours to figure crap out :)


"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."
I do agree, especially the local shop I am at they know we are military when we walk in the door and they try and screw us anyway possible. On the other hand I would like to work on my bike but "teaching a man to fish" means I need someone to show/help. Im not the best at reading DIY and being able to do it. I guess i could look on youtube but when unexpected questions come up, then what ya know?
 

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I do agree, especially the local shop I am at they know we are military when we walk in the door and they try and screw us anyway possible. On the other hand I would like to work on my bike but "teaching a man to fish" means I need someone to show/help. Im not the best at reading DIY and being able to do it. I guess i could look on youtube but when unexpected questions come up, then what ya know?
Have a camera phone ready to take a photo of any potential fuck up that you make and post on the forum to get an answer. Also, drink 3 of those bottles before working to put yourself into the correct mindset. Last, I've gotten help from others that are experienced when tackling jobs outside of Youtube learning or I don't have the toolage for.

But really, gas, oil, and battery is about the same as Ikea furniture. If you have ever used a screw drive, you are qualified for this job. If you were asking about a valve adjustment, I'd say take it to someone, but this stuff is easy. You learn by doing and sometimes fucking shit up. Go get your hands dirty...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Have a camera phone ready to take a photo of any potential fuck up that you make and post on the forum to get an answer. Also, drink 3 of those bottles before working to put yourself into the correct mindset. Last, I've gotten help from others that are experienced when tackling jobs outside of Youtube learning or I don't have the toolage for.

But really, gas, oil, and battery is about the same as Ikea furniture. If you have ever used a screw drive, you are qualified for this job. If you were asking about a valve adjustment, I'd say take it to someone, but this stuff is easy. You learn by doing and sometimes fucking shit up. Go get your hands dirty...
Well thanks for the advice for what's needed. I also think I am going to but new tires. They have about 7-8k mi on them anyway plus they have been sitting on a garage floor for 6 months..I didn't think to use cardboard or wood to sit them on. Maybe I'll post my progress when I get back to the U.S. because I have some time off for R&R. Again thanks everyone!
 

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In case we overlooked the OBVIOUS!!!.... Stay safe, keep your powder dry, and your hatchet scoured. Best of luck on the deployment!!! Don't worry about the bike; you'll have much more important things on your mind than the bike. It'll be there when you get back. We'll be waiting for your safe return, and hopefully a "war story" as you tell us about putting the bike back in service!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
In case we overlooked the OBVIOUS!!!.... Stay safe, keep your powder dry, and your hatchet scoured. Best of luck on the deployment!!! Don't worry about the bike; you'll have much more important things on your mind than the bike. It'll be there when you get back. We'll be waiting for your safe return, and hopefully a "war story" as you tell us about putting the bike back in service!
Thank you very much! Im safe, On the last turn of my deployment and already in a much safer environment then I was a few weeks back! Seriously though, I appreciate all the help/support and the thanks from this thread. I have been on this thread for almost a year but didn't join right away. Most the riders on here are awesome! Again thanks everyone and I'll update you guys when I'm back and working on the bike! :bigsmile:
 
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