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Hi I bought a new 2014 zx6r and I was wondering what should I do to it and adjust on it any suggestions please anything helps thank you :):)
 

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Also I put 92 non ethinol fuel in it and it sounds like it's having a rough time starting up but I don't know what do you guys use
 

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When cold they start up a little rough should come smooth after 15 to 30 seconds. It's normal as far as I'm aware.

Get the suspension setup to your weight
Tidy tail
Exhaust
I also found tank grips to be a good investment.
 

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Hi I bought a new 2014 zx6r and I was wondering what should I do to it and adjust on it any suggestions please anything helps thank you :):)
Sit on the bike, in your 'natural' seating position.... whtever that is, you need that to be the most comfortable and efficient way you can sit on the bike. The hand levers and foot controls are all adjustable, to suit different sized hands and feet.

The 'reach' to the control can be adjusted easily. The OEM hand levers have adjustment to set where they engage.

More importantly, you can rotate the actual angle the lever has, with respect to your fingers. This makes using the controls much more effective, if the lever is set so that you just point your fingers and they lay on top of the lever. If you have to reach 'up' or 'down'. that increases the leverage you have to apply to work the control. Your wrist should not be bent when you work the controls; should be very similar to the angle you have when you shake someone's hand.

Foot controls should be the same way. There shouldn't be any interference between your boots and the lever. It should be simple to slide your foot in and out of contact with the shifter, or the brake pedal.

Mirrors are another area that there is almost no end to what you can do.... my goal is to see as much as possible. The tops of the mirrors are level with the ground, in my case. The stalks of the mirrors are pushed forward, so the mirrors are as wide as possible. They are set so I can see the adjacent lanes, not straight behind me.

Basic controls, set for the least effort required, mirrors set for the most information I can get, then the suspension set up so it makes the chassis stay as smooth and level as possible....
 

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Welcome to the forum!!

What's the highest octane u guys get over their? We have at least 95 but can get 97-99 in most places now
Just so we are clear, unless your bike is set up to run on higher octane fuel the only thing you are burning is the money in your wallet.

There is a general misconception that running higher octane fuel produces more power which is entirely untrue. All it does is prevent pre-detonation in high compression engines. In fact, higher octane fuels are more difficult to ignite, requiring a more defined spark so when you really get up there in the octane rating it can actually run worse and lose power if you aren't set up to run it.

Case in point, arguably the best fuel out there right now is VP MR12 which can boost performance by 5%+ just by running it...is 87 motor octane or 93 R+M/2.
 

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Hi I bought a new 2014 zx6r and I was wondering what should I do to it and adjust on it any suggestions please anything helps thank you :):)
I always recommend modifying the rider first. Start with the MSF course first, then Total Control, and California Superbike School. YOU are the most valuable part of the riding system, invest in yourself.:bigthumb:
 

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Just so we are clear, unless your bike is set up to run on higher octane fuel the only thing you are burning is the money in your wallet.

There is a general misconception that running higher octane fuel produces more power which is entirely untrue. All it does is prevent pre-detonation in high compression engines. In fact, higher octane fuels are more difficult to ignite, requiring a more defined spark so when you really get up there in the octane rating it can actually run worse and lose power if you aren't set up to run it.

Case in point, arguably the best fuel out there right now is VP MR12 which can boost performance by 5%+ just by running it...is 87 motor octane or 93 R+M/2.
Yep, my mr2 turbo was mapped to run 97+....any lower and my ecu detects knock if on high boost...as you said lower octane ignites easier hense bigger chance in pre ignition...was just curious as to what u guys get over their
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I always recommend modifying the rider first. Start with the MSF course first, then Total Control, and California Superbike School. YOU are the most valuable part of the riding system, invest in yourself.:bigthumb:
Ya I took the course
 

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So then my bike says 90+ octane should I run 92 non ethinol or 92 with ethinol ?
As long as the RON+MON/2 is 90+, you are good to go. Ethanol is not really your friend, but it's not the end of the world, either. I wouldn't want to store a bike for months on end without using a fuel conditioner of some kind if I had to store it with gasoline which has ethanol in it, but running it every day, I wouldn't be concerned. You get slightly better MPG without alcohol.
 

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As long as the RON+MON/2 is 90+, you are good to go. Ethanol is not really your friend, but it's not the end of the world, either. I wouldn't want to store a bike for months on end without using a fuel conditioner of some kind if I had to store it with gasoline which has ethanol in it, but running it every day, I wouldn't be concerned. You get slightly better MPG without alcohol.
Ok awesome thank yoi so much
 

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Ya I took the course
As you are in Oregon, sign up for the ART through Team Oregon. It's taught at Pat's Acres on a shifter go-kart track, near Wilsonville. The goal of the course is to teach you how to stop on a curve without losing control, and how to carve a corner rather than hack at it. Some of the most fun you can have with your clothes on. At least, until the cruisers get in the way. :(
 

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Another of the more important investments you can make to keep your bike operational as possible, is to invest in some sort of bodywork protection. This is typically done with 'sliders' -- something to hit the ground before the plastics do. Gravity is a constant, our attention is not. Sooner or later gravity wins.

Sliders come in a few varieties... 'no cut' and 'cut' are the most common. The cautionary statement with sliders is that they are really only meant to protect the plastics in the event of a low speed tip over. Parking lot, walking speed sorts of things. In those cases the plastic tip 'slides' on the pavement sacrificing itself instead of the bike.

Higher speed mishaps can be made worse, due to the design of the typical slider. As most of these designs use an engine mounting bolt location to insert a longer bolt to hold the slider, the slider itself can impart a levering force to the mounting point. The frame was not designed with this force in mind. If the bike hits something that is more solid than the slider body as it is sliding, the bolt may bend, or snap off, or yank the threads out of the frame..... or crack the frame.

Frame rails use 3 points of contact to spread those forces out and prevent frame damage. Some slider designs are a hybrid, which use a 3 point plate that the actual slider mounts to. SATO RACING | Engine Sliders - Kawasaki ZX-6R ('09-'12) is one of the designs I think does the best job of addressing this. http://www.gbracing.eu/Kawasaki.110/Ninja-ZX-6R-636-2013-2015.343/Engine-Protection.344/ is another design that I think is above average in terms of how it will protect the bike.

Either solution is more expensive than the cheapest option.... in truth I have neither of these on my bike, or any other type of protection. I will jynx myself saying I havn't had need of this on this bike in the 20K miles I have ridden it so far -- I have in fact crashed 3 of the 6 motorcycles I have owned, so it seems likely this one will eventually suffer as well.....
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Another of the more important investments you can make to keep your bike operational as possible, is to invest in some sort of bodywork protection. This is typically done with 'sliders' -- something to hit the ground before the plastics do. Gravity is a constant, our attention is not. Sooner or later gravity wins.

Sliders come in a few varieties... 'no cut' and 'cut' are the most common. The cautionary statement with sliders is that they are really only meant to protect the plastics in the event of a low speed tip over. Parking lot, walking speed sorts of things. In those cases the plastic tip 'slides' on the pavement sacrificing itself instead of the bike.

Higher speed mishaps can be made worse, due to the design of the typical slider. As most of these designs use an engine mounting bolt location to insert a longer bolt to hold the slider, the slider itself can impart a levering force to the mounting point. The frame was not designed with this force in mind. If the bike hits something that is more solid than the slider body as it is sliding, the bolt may bend, or snap off, or yank the threads out of the frame..... or crack the frame.

Frame rails use 3 points of contact to spread those forces out and prevent frame damage. Some slider designs are a hybrid, which use a 3 point plate that the actual slider mounts to. SATO RACING | Engine Sliders - Kawasaki ZX-6R ('09-'12) is one of the designs I think does the best job of addressing this. http://www.gbracing.eu/Kawasaki.110/Ninja-ZX-6R-636-2013-2015.343/Engine-Protection.344/ is another design that I think is above average in terms of how it will protect the bike.

Either solution is more expensive than the cheapest option.... in truth I have neither of these on my bike, or any other type of protection. I will jynx myself saying I havn't had need of this on this bike in the 20K miles I have ridden it so far -- I have in fact crashed 3 of the 6 motorcycles I have owned, so it seems likely this one will eventually suffer as well.....
Well thank you I will definitely look into it :)
 
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