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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, I posted about wanting a 2013 ZX6R but will no longer go that route. I will get a 650R or something along those lines. My best friend from high school moved to Sacramento last year and when I told him about my interest, he told me it was a bad idea and that his friend's brother passed away last year in the fall from a motorcycle accident. He was riding a 2013 ZX6R and it was his first bike, like me, no prior experience. He passed away in an accident where he wasn't expecting a semi truck to stop so suddenly and he broke too hard and he flipped into the truck. The cops said he was speeding too fast and they had video on it from his camera. Very sad.

Here is his Youtube channel showing the only video he posted. He was supposed to make a bunch of videos apparently showing off his bike and the mods he did to them. RIP

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmgxQ7CGzrg
 

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Sorry to hear that. 600s are definitely not good starter bikes. New riders who get them as their first bike either fear the bike, halting all progress of becoming a better rider. Or go way too fast, way too often and get hurt or worse. Very few '600 as a first bike' people I know have become good riders. Most have gotten hurt and quit, or 'upgraded' to 1000s and are still crappy squid riders.

It's good you decided to go the twin route. Twins are a lot more forgiving and easier to ride than a high strung 4 cylinder. I started off on a twin, and it taught me a lot about the dynamics and physics of motorcycle riding without severely punishing you for mistakes you're inevitably going to make. You'll be glad you got the 650 as you'll be a better rider in the long run.
 

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no offense, but he seems to of had more of a factor in his death then the bike he was riding. He was inexperienced, speeding, and if he grabbed enough brake to be thrown into the back of the truck, in which case he would of never stopped in time in the first place. Sorry for your loss.

Not that a 650 isnt a great bike, i own one and its fun, but even a 650r can get well over 100mph, and its up to you to manage that, not the bike.
 

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Very few '600 as a first bike' people I know have become good riders. Most have gotten hurt and quit, or 'upgraded' to 1000s and are still crappy squid riders.
perhaps that has something to do with the people you know. Plenty of the people on here started on 6's and are damn good, damn fast riders.
 

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Sorry to hear about your friend.

My first bike is my 05 636, but I have plenty of experience on two wheels from dirtbiking. As a starter bike for someone with no experience, I would most certainly never recommend the zx6r. It has a ton of power and isn't very forgiving if you aren't careful with it.

That being said, I think anyone could start on a 600 (although some probably shouldn't) as long as they respect the power the bike has and goes into it with a mindset of being careful. I have a friend who started on a gsxr 600 and does pretty well for himself given his experience. He rides knowing his skill set and what he can/can not do.

Also I'd recommend taking an MSF course. It's a great learning experience for someone with no prior experience. When I did my course, I was amazed to watch the people in the course with me change over the two days. They started off as timid riders and then started trusting what they had learned/practiced.

Whichever path you choose, just be mindful of everything around you and always ride safely!

:)
 

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perhaps that has something to do with the people you know. Plenty of the people on here started on 6's and are damn good, damn fast riders.
Great. Welcome to the 'Very Few' club.

I'm not in the 'Don't get a 600 as your first bike camp'. Far from it actually. Get whatever bike you want, but be prepared to pay for whatever consequences your stupidity has in store for you. The point I'm trying to make is that some people break through the plateau and become excellent riders, while a lot do not.
 

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Great. Welcome to the 'Very Few' club.

I'm not in the 'Don't get a 600 as your first bike camp'. Far from it actually. Get whatever bike you want, but be prepared to pay for whatever consequences your stupidity has in store for you. The point I'm trying to make is that some people break through the plateau and become excellent riders, while a lot do not.
Thank you for the compliment but I didn't say I was part of said "club". A common factor to this club is amount of track days done/smart twisty riding with respect to stupidity.

Not trying to start a pissing contest, only starting that your idea maybe flawed by an observation you made on a select few people you "know." Anyway....
 

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That's a tragic tale you tell.

But to give you some advice, I think a Ninja 300 ABS would be a good choice for a new rider. Faster than most cars, it will be fine for your first year or 2. Look for a good used one. ABS is good if you don't want to lock up your wheels or flip your bike.
At street speeds, the Ninja 650 is almost as fast as the 636 (80-100 mph). You don't need it yet.
Take as many motorcycle courses as you can (MSF, total control,CSS).
Wear your gear.

If you don't take riding seriously it doesn't matter what bike you ride, you will significantly increase you risks. Hubris is dangerous. Constant vigilance is required, and never trust a cager or truck.
 

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Thank you for the compliment but I didn't say I was part of said "club". A common factor to this club is amount of track days done/smart twisty riding with respect to stupidity.

Not trying to start a pissing contest, only starting that your idea maybe flawed by an observation you made on a select few people you "know." Anyway....
Not trying to start a pissing contest either. But yea, I would talk about people I know. Well... because I know them. I'm not qualified to make observations about people I don't know. Flawed 'idea' or not, I can only speak from MY experiences. Maybe yours and others are different. Maybe they're the same. I don't really care.
 

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Sounds like you have a good head on your shoulders. I'm not going to jump into the '600 for first bike or not' debate, but if you probably know it, then it may not be for you.

At least not for your first bike. Ideally, you want your first bike to be something that you respect. Not fear. That way you learn on it and begin to have fun on two wheels.

Even if you end up getting a much smaller bike, gear and training are paramount... cannot stress this enough.
 

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That's a tragic tale you tell.

But to give you some advice, I think a Ninja 300 ABS would be a good choice for a new rider. Faster than most cars, it will be fine for your first year or 2. Look for a good used one. ABS is good if you don't want to lock up your wheels or flip your bike.
At street speeds, the Ninja 650 is almost as fast as the 636 (80-100 mph). You don't need it yet.
Take as many motorcycle courses as you can (MSF, total control,CSS).
Wear your gear.

If you don't take riding seriously it doesn't matter what bike you ride, you will significantly increase you risks. Hubris is dangerous. Constant vigilance is required, and never trust a cager or truck.
+5
 

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That's a tragic tale you tell.

Wear your gear.

If you don't take riding seriously it doesn't matter what bike you ride, you will significantly increase you risks. Hubris is dangerous. Constant vigilance is required, and never trust a cager or truck.
^This was my point exactly.
 

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For every guy that started out fine on a 600, there's probably 7-8, if not more, who did crash and burn. Starting on a smaller bike doesn't guarantee you safefy but it does decrease your mistakes and screw ups...and no matter how much you respect the power/throttle, we will all make mistakes and you do it on an inline 4, the consequences tend to be more dire. Everyone will give the same "if you respect the bike, you will be fine" and that's like giving a 6 year old who's always wanted a box of sweets... a box of sweets and then telling him "don't eat too many or you will get sick". Sure you're gonna get a few 6 year olds who won't devour the entire thing but you will surely end up with even more sick 6 year olds. Sure they know they shouldn't eat so many sweets, I'm sure these little kids are aware enough that they are telling themselves they will only eat one more, yea they heard you tell them they would get sick yet...

If someone is a close friend, I will sit them down and talk to them as much as I can, giving them as much advice as possible, showing videos, stats etc because getting a supersport as your first bike (especially without any prior experiences on two wheels) is like riding without any gear. Sure you can do it, anyone can but the better question is, SHOULD YOU? I know what my answer is and that's what you need to answer.

I know we all won't agree on this and that's fine. Those of you that don't, you've put in your two cents and I've put in mine. As stated, no need for a redundant pissing match. Just be safe, wear your gear, and keep the rubber on the road my fellow riders.

/$0.02

May the guy rest in peace
 
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Sorry to hear about your friend and kudo's to you for having a good head on your shoulders.

The sad truth is that for 90% of the riders out there, a 600 is far more power than they will ever need or use to its potential.

A 650 is a great bike, agile, and more than capable of putting a smile on your face...and it will STILL be more power than you need.

"It is better to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow"
 

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OP,

I was fortunate enough to start riding when I was around 11 years old. The first 2 wheelers I rode had less than 10 HP, and topped out at around 40 MPH. Still plenty fast to have a potentially leathal interaction with a fixed object. 25 MPH is how fast you hit the ground, if you jump out of a second story window, as a point of reference. I have known a number of people in the past 50+ years that have died. Some of them have even been involved in motorcycle accidents. The H-U-G-E majority of the people I know who are no longer in this world, did something stupid that helped cause the end of their time here.

The human body was developed to protect the operator from typical accidents that occur when you cannot get going any faster than you can run. Even that, still leaves scars.

As you ride, you will push the environment, until you exceed your ability to control it. Whether that 'edge' is catastrophically bad or not depends on a multitude of factors. Good gear will somewhat reduce the probability of a fatal encounter, and it will significantly reduce the amount of injuries any given accident is likely to impose on the operator.

Slower, smaller, lighter bikes are good for learning how to deal with the inevitable. They give the operator more time to respond becfore the penultimate moment. If you have more time to decide there is a problem, and can take corrective action BEFORE you HAVE TO, the odds of sucess increase.

Chuck Yeager said that "A pilot crashes, when he runs out of air speed, altitude and ideas, all at the same time."

We fly, very very close to the ground......

Street bikes in general accelerate the rate at which decisions need to be made to survive. High power, light weight, and testosterone will lead to a lot more riders seeking the edge of control -- and that involves a much higher rate of decisions that must be made accurately, and well.

A newbie, without formal training? Starting out in the city? A lightweight, moderately powerful bike is a better choice than a 600. Personally, I think a DRz400, or a 300cc sporty bike makes a LOT more sense. 20 HP, sub 300 lbs? Greater than 70 MPG, topping out around 100 MPH isn't shabby at all.

Obviously, there's a lot of people here and elsewhere that started out with a 600 I4. And feel like they are sucessful.

Neither route is better.

Everyone who rides will eventually crash. Gravity NEVER lets up. Sooner or later your attention will not meet the requriements of the situation, and a 'gravitational moment' will occur.

The more experience and training you have, surrounded by the best safety gear you can afford, no drugs/alcohol, plenty of sleep, no anger issues, never in a rush, never distracted by a thong, or a sunburn..... the longer you will ride without incident.
 

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perhaps that has something to do with the people you know. Plenty of the people on here started on 6's and are damn good, damn fast riders.
Yeah, I know a lot of guys that started with 600's (including me)... It's all about your brain. If you are guy that has need for speed then you are going to die on the bike no matter what bike you start.

If you want adrenaline and speed hit the TRACK not the Road...

In my opinion it's all about self control, you dont need to fear the bike because she/it is strong... you need to respect it.

Of course this is just my opinion.
 

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RJ, that is a damned good post. Should be stickied for new riders. PS, I don't think it was the OP's friend that died but a brother of the OP's best friend's friend...if that makes sense.

XSplinter is right, if you have a need for speed and you do it on the street vs the track, you will end up dead regardless of what you ride...although the more powerful and faster the bike, the quicker it will happen
 

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no offense, but he seems to of had more of a factor in his death then the bike he was riding. He was inexperienced, speeding, and if he grabbed enough brake to be thrown into the back of the truck, in which case he would of never stopped in time in the first place. Sorry for your loss.

Not that a 650 isnt a great bike, i own one and its fun, but even a 650r can get well over 100mph, and its up to you to manage that, not the bike.
Absolutely 100% agree, if this wasn't written then I would have.
Sure it is tragic and sad but people riding outside their ability can get hurt/killed no matter what they ride/drive...if you feel the zx6r isn't for you then we'll done on being honest with yourself...takes much more maturity than someone trying to impress by owning a bike way out of their league. But as said most bikes will get to 100mph in no time and an idiot on a 125 is more likely to crash than a sensible person on a 600. Example: 3 of my close friends ride and two started on a 600 (as did I on a gsxr)....the 3rd started on a 125, then moved to a 250 and finally a 1000 (the third although a friend of mine is a complete idiot on any bike and I mostly choose not to ride with him as he is erratic and takes ridiculous risks which should never be taken on the road. Respect the bike, respect your limits and respect other road users...do this and you can ride whatever you like
 

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But as said most bikes will get to 100mph in no time and an idiot on a 125 is more likely to crash than a sensible person on a 600
Comparing an idiot on a 125 vs an sensible person on a 600 changes the key variable lol. An idiot on a 125 is likely to live longer and survive more crashes than an idiot on a 600.

I will say my BIL was an idiot squid but luckily his brother FORCED him to get a 250 first. He was so pissed because within a month, he outgrew it but he crashed shortly after month #2 taking a turn too sharp with no gear except a helmet. He was fine but had a bunch of road rash that he wears to this day. Bike hit the curb and flipped onto someone's lawn. Long story short, he WAS an idiot and survived his stupid mistake and is no longer an idiot. Rides a 600 now, ATGATT, and doesn't do stupid things anymore. I might end up doing track with him one of the years.

Again, the faster the bike, the stronger the bike, the more tourqey the bike, the faster they meet their maker. Sometimes that small bike will let them learn their mortality and how fragile life is...and sometimes it won't matter. In the end, stupid people who do stupid things will eventually meet their maker.
 

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IMO supermotos are the best learners. Theyre quick, cheap to insure, cheap to repair, insane handling at street speeds, and just about the only type of bike thats fun on city streets. To top it off you can take em off road.
I had a wr250x I loved, I was just too big for it really. I can see a ktm 690 in my future as a second bike though.
 
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