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Hello all I'm new here the the forum and also to the zx6r. I should be getting my new 2014 zx6r on Tuesday, and was just wondering if there are anything I should look into doing once I get the bike. From a lot of or views I have seem people say that getting the ecu flashed for the thermostat to kick on earlier is a good thing to do. Just wondering what else I should invest in to get the bike just right. Thanks for any help y'all can give.
 

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Get the suspension set for your weight. If this is your first bike, I'd forgo working on go fast mods and invest in good gear and a class or two and watch Twist of the Wrist if you haven't yet. I've acquired goodies on the bike and still haven't worked my way up to an ECU flash. But...I did wait longer than I should have to have the suspension set...it makes a world of difference. Congrats on your new bike!
 

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Thank you sir for that. Its not my first bike I do have an ex500 but this will be my first inline 4. I wasn't really looking to flash the ECU for speed more just for the fans to kick on sooner be uase of what I heard about the zx6r running a little hot in traffic. Thanks for tip on suspension that was another thing I read about getting dialed in.
 

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As mentioned above, definitely get your suspension tuned for your weight. The stock suspension is really soft out of the factory. Simple $40 and you will notice the difference.

Don't worry about modding the thermostat. I routinely run this bike above 220 and the bike has no issues. It's fan does a great job of keeping it cool in high temps. so much so that at higher temps, you'll see a 15-20 degree jump when you turn the bike off and the fan goes off. You don't need it to kick on any sooner than it does, all you would be doing was putting more strain on the bike.

A lot of people get freaked out seeing temps above 200. It's completely normal. Until you start pushing coolant out of the overflow, you do not have overheating issues.
 
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From a lot of or views I have seem people say that getting the ecu flashed for the thermostat to kick on earlier is a good thing to do.
Great choice of bike bro, you'll never regret it.

Umm, I never heard of doing that and I have a 2014. My fan kicks on about 206-207 degrees which is normal. I rarely see that temp here in NY except for the summer. I was riding yesterday and I only saw 160 degrees so my fan never kicked on as the air was cooling it. You definitely don't need to do that. To each their own but I wouldn't. There's really no reason to do that.

Don't beak it in too soft. Make sure you fluctuate the RPMs as much as you can meaning don't sit in 6th gear going 50mph holding the RPMs in one specific spot. You want to set the rings good and make a good seal. The way I broke in my 636 was 1st gear to 12k RPM, close throttle, engine brake. Stretch first to 12k again, this time shift to 2nd, stretch 2nd to 12k close throttle, engine brake 2nd down, downshift to 1st, engine brake. 1st to 12k, shift, 2nd to 12k, shift 3rd to 12k, close throttle, engine brake 3rd down, down shift to 2nd, engine brake 2nd down, downshift to 1st, engine brake. 1st to 12k, shift, 2nd to 12k, shift, 3rd to 12k, shift, stretch 4th to 12k, close throttle, engine brake, downshift to 3rd engine brake, downshift to 2nd engine brake, downshift to 1st engine brake. You keep this pattern going until you reach 6th, and engine brake and downshift every gear back to 1st. This will get the engine working both ways very well in each gear and you'll break it in perfectly. I did that for about 75 miles so for the first 75 miles I wasn't really riding. Oh, and let's say you do that for 100 miles for example, every 20 miles go back home, and let the bike cool down, then warm it back up, and go back out for another 20. Heat cycles during break in is just as important as fluctuation of the RPMs. This technique I've used breaking in two of my own bikes, and about 3 bikes of friends, and they all run GREAT.

This right here is a GREAT READ!

Once I hit 75 miles with a few heat cycles, I changed the oil as I wanted to get the flakes out. I used Kawi 10w40 and a OEM filter. Make sure if and when you buy OEM oil filters from the dealer they give you a 0004 not a 0008 as 0008 is China and 0004 is Japan, and Japan is better. I then stopped doing that technique above and I rode it more normally but still fluctuating the hell out of the RPMs but just not like I was before. At 300 miles I did another oil change again with Kawi 10w40 and a 0004 oil filter. At 680 miles I took her in for first service. It was 680 because they couldn't get me in the day I hit 600. I let them do a complete first service including yet another oil change. After this service was done, I then rode completely normal I would hold the RPMs at one spot just cruising as now it was alright to do so. At 3,000 miles I dumped out that Kawi oil, and put in the magical Mobil 1 4T which of course makes the bike feel a million times better. I TOTALLY HIGHLY RECOMMEND Mobil 1 4T at 3,000 miles. At 3,800 miles it was time for 2nd service but since I just did an oil change 800 miles earlier I told the dealer to do everything but the oil change which was OK by them as well as making the service cheaper. At 7,000 miles I changed it again with M14T, and at 7,600 miles which is 3rd service I had dealer do the same thing everything but the oil change.

As for other things.

If you're going to get a fender eliminator I recommend the one by TST as it comes with a plate that will cover the hole the stock one leaves behind this way your back tire won't kick water up into your little rear compartment. When you add to cart add on the little LED light for the license plate. That little LED strip works GREAT!

TST Industries Elite-1 Fender Eliminator for 2013+ Kawasaki Ninja ZX6R 636

If you want to get a integrated tail light, I recommend the smoked one by Motodynamic. It's a great integrated tail light.

2013 2014 2015 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R LED Tail light Integrated Sequential Smoke

Here's a video with both on my bike.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-yLo-wtGzo

As for an exhaust. If you're going to just get a slip on to hold you over go M4GP bro. The M4GP sounds the best on the 636. I've heard a lot of exhausts in person on the '13's, 14's, and 15's, and the M4GP sounds the best by far.

Here's a video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jw3i7Spf1QE

Here are some other videos you can check out if you want.

LED Running Lights

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbhoueD5Y7o

Sylvania zXe Lights ( Until I get my HIDs )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lnx2KvGBSQo

Foam Blaster 6

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u8CqwZxsmC4

Slime Portable Air Pump

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YDAjwBWNwg







Feel free to PM me anytime as this is the 2nd season I have this bike, and I put just a little under 10,000 miles on her already. I'll be more than happy to help you out anyway I can.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you @Muilisx for all of the great advice especially about the break in period. I was quite sure about how to go about it other than going with what the dealer said. This is going to be the first new vehicle, new as in something with zero miles I would like to do break it in the right way.
 
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Thank you @Muilisx for all of the great advice especially about the break in period. I was quite sure about how to go about it other than going with what the dealer said. This is going to be the first new vehicle, new as in something with zero miles I would like to do break it in the right way.
Indeed, the dealer and manual will tell you not to go above 4k RPM for the first 600 miles which is not only completely bonus but in all fairness impossible. If you don't want your bike eating oil for no reason and if you want your bike to have the best power output in the long run then follow that technique. Read it a few times so you can fully grasp the concept and then execute it. Doing it for 100 miles can be a little overkill as it's a lot of up and down, and stop and go but you could get away with doing it for 60 miles. Every 15 miles go home, and let her cool down and become cold to where the temp gauge shows - - - when you turn it on . Let her warm back up, and go back out and do it again for 15 miles. If you're comfortable working on it yourself then after those first 60 miles do an oil change but go to the dealer and buy the Kawasaki 10w40 and OEM Oil Filter again make sure it's 0004.

Now, the oil filter location on our bike is on the left side and you can't get your hand in there like you can on the Ninja 300 so the easiest way to do it which will be a complete breeze would be to purchase the two very reasonable priced items below.

Oil Filter Wrench Cap

Amazon.com: GearWrench Tools 3253 End Cap Oil Filter Wrench: Home Improvement

3/8 Breaker Bar

TEKTON 15353 3/8-Inch Drive by 12-Inch Breaker Bar - - Amazon.com

Both of those will create this making getting the old one off and the new one on an absolute breeze



When you go to put the new filter on, dip your finger in the dirty oil and rub it around the rubber seal, and then twist it as much as you can go with your fingers, and then put that thing back on, and turn it to where it gets snug and then one last tiny hair of a turn. The first filter that comes on the bike from the dealer will ALWAYS be on way too tight which can be a bad thing as if you make the oil filter too tight you can crush the rubber seal and have a leak so the expression is hand tight, and then a hair more. Those two tools will make your oil changes headache free trust me. Go ahead and buy those two exact items. I LOVE THEM.

This is my oil change technique which causes me never to have too little or too much. It has NEVER failed me yet and I've done oil changed on my bike a lot already and most of my friends who ride come to me.

Our 636 holds 3.6 quarts with a new oil filter ( always change oil filter ). Now, some people like to fill the oil filter before putting it on but to me that's pretty much impossible to do without spilling any not to mention you will almost always get air in there that way not to mention it's just dumb IMO.

I put my oil filters on empty. I use OEM oil filters and I make sure I get 0004 which is Japan and not 0008 which is China. I then pour 3 quarts in, and I run the bike for 45-60 seconds. I do this so the oil filter can fill with oil so when I turn the bike off, wait a few minutes and check the oil level, the reading I am getting is with a full oil filter and not an empty one. I then pour in half of the last bottle, and my oil level is ALWAYS EXACTLY where it needs to be. A lot of people will pour in the 3.4-3.6 quarts, and call it a day but they don't realize their oil level actually drops a little as they're not compensating for the oil that's going to fill the filter. 3 quarts in, run the bike to fill the filter, cut it off, wait a minute, check the oil level ( if you want ) pour in the remaining required amount. I NEVER had an issue doing it this way and I never had to say oh shit I need to add more or oh shit I need to take some out.
 

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Spend some money on decent gear and the first thing I would do is get some frame sliders
 
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Spend some money on decent gear and the first thing I would do is get some frame sliders
I have plenty of gear and am definitely looking to get some frame slider, just in case. What about a steering dampener? I have been reading a little bit on the forums and it seems people are kind of split about getting one.
 

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I have plenty of gear and am definitely looking to get some frame slider, just in case. What about a steering dampener? I have been reading a little bit on the forums and it seems people are kind of split about getting one.
Are you going to ride like a fool? Do you have decent throttle control? You enjoy wheelies? I have a 2013, same exact bike as the '14s and I do not feel many of the modern day bikes need steering dampeners for the road but that's just my opinion.

Also, order those frame sliders asap and put them on your bike before you take it for a spin. We've had a few guys come on here talking about dropping their bikes within the first few rides.
 
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