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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

I'm currently a 20 year old college students who wants to get a 2013+ ZX6R really bad. I've wanted to ride since I was 12. I'm starting a new job at Under Armour soon too just for a little insight. I currently do not have a lot of funds to go towards buying a used bike from someone because I'm sure its $5k+. Do you guys have any tips for me in terms of how to start? Besides the basic "start the new jobs and save up?" I only say that last part because that's already my baseline. I'm interested in other ideas, something that I may not have already thought of before.

Thanks for taking the time to read and respond!

(P.S. Im brand new to this site, sorry if I by any chance broke any rules or something.)
 

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Hi everyone,

I'm currently a 20 year old college students who wants to get a 2013+ ZX6R really bad. I've wanted to ride since I was 12. I'm starting a new job at Under Armour soon too just for a little insight. I currently do not have a lot of funds to go towards buying a used bike from someone because I'm sure its $5k+. Do you guys have any tips for me in terms of how to start? Besides the basic "start the new jobs and save up?" I only say that last part because that's already my baseline. I'm interested in other ideas, something that I may not have already thought of before.

Thanks for taking the time to read and respond!

(P.S. Im brand new to this site, sorry if I by any chance broke any rules or something.)
My advice would be to start on a smaller, cheaper bike and get some rider training. You will crash/drop your first bike most likely and you are better of doing that on a cheaper/smaller/lighter bike. A ZX6R is kind of akin to getting a Ferrari as a first car. Just my opinion.
 

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The right answer, IMHO, is to buy your safety gear before you buy the bike. Invest in keeping your skin intact. It's a lot less of an adventure to replace a bike or swap out broken parts on it, rather than you.

In the same line of thought...... go through as much formal training as you can get your hands on. Learn the right things to do before you have to unlearn the less efficient and potentially (more) dangerous techniques you will develop in the vacuum.

Spend $1.5-2K on the gear. Jacket, helmet, pants, gloves, boots. You can get a little cheaper, and you can certainly spend a lot more. Make sure your gear isn't color coded to your dream bike -- the gear is likely to out last whatever bike you get. It only goes south if you crash in it in a serious way. I have textile jackets that I have been using since 2001. Very. Rugged. Construction. Has to be, to help you survive a crash...... if you don't crash, it won't wear out. (for this reason, used gear is a good way to save cash.) Specialized gear is orders of magnitude better than what you can bodge together yourself.

Training is an education, only it's almost always a lot more 'hands on' than a class at college. Some states, it's free. Some educational bodies offer it at a discount. Whatever you have to pay, it's going to be money well spent. Having a impartial observer, who is trained specifically on how to coach the learning process for what is involved in riding is something that a price cannot be put on. Checking your ego at the door, and really working to learn what is being communicated will benefit you the rest of your life. A lot of the techniques demonstrated and explained are counter intuitive. Best to learn the right way first.

You may notice that I haven't said what you should pay for a bike, or what kind of bike. That's such an open ended question that it is very difficult to give you an answer that is 'one size fits all'.

I learned to ride on mini bikes, then moderately powered dual sport bikes, then got to ride a few motocross bikes before I ever bought my own. This is not as common as it once was..... considering I learned to ride in the the mid 1970's, a lot has changed.
 

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If you have never rode a bike before, take a training class if you have one around your area.

If not, get a smaller bike like a 250 and have a friend who rides to teach u the basics in a big empty parking lot. You will drop it...guaranteed! So dont go for the best looking, best condition bike. Remember, its just a temporary beater for learning. Once u get it down and have been riding for 2 or 3 months, u can probably sell it for the same price u bought it for. Then get yourself a 600.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So maybe a 300? The one of the main reasons I was getting a zx6r was because people always say 300s and such are nice to start but after a few months you'd get tired of it. I know how to ride (used to do motocross etc). Maybe I might get a 300 mainly for price...
 

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So maybe a 300? The one of the main reasons I was getting a zx6r was because people always say 300s and such are nice to start but after a few months you'd get tired of it. I know how to ride (used to do motocross etc). Maybe I might get a 300 mainly for price...
Well shit, u didnt tell us that part lol.

U should be good on a 600 then.
 

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So maybe a 300? The one of the main reasons I was getting a zx6r was because people always say 300s and such are nice to start but after a few months you'd get tired of it. I know how to ride (used to do motocross etc). Maybe I might get a 300 mainly for price...
Yeah, that changes things some. I was assuming you had never ridden before when you said "I've wanted to ride since I was 12."

300 would still be a good introductory street bike. Street riding is quite a bit different than dirt riding. Get a used one that has already depreciated and then sell it in 6 months and get the 6R.
 

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Any of the 500 or 650 twin cylinder designs would be less expensive to operate and insure, compared to a ss. Still enough to ride on the highway safely, too. Capable of 2 up when desired as well.
 

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650 twin is pretty much the best option for a learning bike IMO. You can get them fairly inexpensive and they are much more manageable.
Their are thousands of SV650's out there which you can cheaply insure and operate safely. Ninja 650 is another great option.

Right now I'm just tracking my 600, but if I was going to get another road bike it would not be a 600.

Like some have said spend money on gear, then do some riding courses, then buy something that isn't your dream bike. Your MX experience is really good and will help, but there isn't other cars and idiots trying to run into you when riding through the woods.
 
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