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Discussion Starter #1
So I got my first enclosed trailer, great deal too, a 6 x 10 with two Pitbull TRS set ups for $800 from a friend from the track. Then I sold my 5 x 8 open utility trailer for $1,250 so I made off like a bandit lol.

The thing is that this enclosed trailer is pretty old, luckily it's structurally sound and everything works well. The only issue is a leaky roof. It's a one piece aluminum roof, but the leaks are at the strips that are screwed down along the edges where the top aluminum roof meets the side pieces.

I'm thinking of using 6 inch Eternabond RV roof tape to run it along the top of those seams and press it down along each side. I hope to make it through the south FL rainy season for a couple of years. I also have Acrylic roof sealant I use on my back yard patio roof. I'm thinking of slathering some of that over the tape IF there are any future leaks.

Anyone have such luck with Eternabond? Or have any other recommendations?

TIA
 

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I haven't worked with RV sheet metal much. I have worked with galvanized corrugated roofing, over the decades of farm life. If it were me, I would want to drill out whatever rivets are holding the top to the sides, and clean everything up along that seam. Then, I would caulk the space that overlaps, and reattach the roof to the sides. THEN, I would think that over tape would be a good idea. Trapping residual moisture in between those aluminum sheet metal surfaces is just asking for corrosion to occur particularly if you're talking about a hot humid, salty environment.

I would expect the roof to overlap the sides, so any water would run off rather than be trapped (much like a traditional roof would be). Think of that seam as similar to the lower edge of a window casing, where you need to leave a route for water to exit by gravity.....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That sure is thorough. but I don't really see myself spending that much time and effort on it though, that's why I thought rolling out some roof tape over the seams would be a good enough patch for a year, maybe two. I have my eyes on getting some sort of toy hauler set up next. So I just need this to weather the storms for now.

I'll post some pictures later so you can see the exact condition of the strips and where they are . They are more on the top of the trailer, than on the sides.
 

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Ensure it’s clean and dry and your method will likely work fine for a while- if it’s a place holder for future upgrades. But I’d also replace any rusted rivets/screws while i was at it.
 

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I would look into maybe an RV type roof you paint on could be a long term solution for you. But it will be a project removing all the old rivets and prepping it for the epoxy. Might get you by for longer than you think.
 

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Since it looks like the edge of the roof is held down by Phillips screws, you could get lucky with how easy it would be to take it apart and make it right. Do those go into wooden structure inside, or metal? And FWIW, you may get more intelligent answers on a trailer or RV forum than here on this.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Since it looks like the edge of the roof is held down by Phillips screws, you could get lucky with how easy it would be to take it apart and make it right. Do those go into wooden structure inside, or metal? And FWIW, you may get more intelligent answers on a trailer or RV forum than here on this.
I would have to guess those strips are screwed into the metal support beams, not sure but I will check later. And now that you guys are suggesting it, maybe it's worth the extra effort to take it apart a little and do it up really nice and tight. Yea I just thought to ask here, cause you guys have been really helpful. But now I think I might join a trailer forum, I didn't even think of that lol.
 

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Yea I think it is better to go ahead and do it right. Could be not so much fun when at the track and having water dripping all over your stuff.
 

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Given OP made a profit off the sale of the last trailer, it's darn near 'free money' to make it right.... And that investment can only improve the resale of value if he eventually decided to part with it. So much the better, if you can do it yourself; it wouldn't hurt to get an estimate from an RV/trailer repair place....
 

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I had replaced the rubber roof once on the 41' travel trailer with two rooftop heat/ac units and 3 vents....... I would never do it again, I would gladly pay someone else to do it, no matter what it cost....
but on a small enclosed with a metal roof held down by screws like the OP's or my current 5x10, I would likely just do it myself with some new tin up there and seal all the seams internally and externally, then screw in all the channel work
and I would try and find tin much thicker than the original, but all it really has to do is keep weather out.... unless you plan to climb up there
 

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Dicor lap sealant is all you need. Get the type made for horizontal surfaces. 2 tubes is all you'd need to completely reseal a trailer that small
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Dicor lap sealant is all you need. Get the type made for horizontal surfaces. 2 tubes is all you'd need to completely reseal a trailer that small
Thanks, I believe using Dicor is the minimal effort route which will give me good enough results for a year, maybe two, which is enough for me with this trailer. I got a lot of other things to work on right now besides tearing down and rebuilding the roof.

I appreciate everyone's ideas on how to correctly repair it the best way. So thanks for all the input.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Really surprised no one has mentioned flex seal.
I was looking at some YouTube videos of that, that's a good option too. Maybe I'll use the Dicor where the gaps are larger, and then use Flex Seal on the other areas where the gaps of water penetration are very small, so I can cover more areas with buying less products.
 
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