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Discussion Starter #1
Ok this here's a big problem.
It all started off with a battery being over charged with what seemed to be a bad regulator. My bike was not starting after the battery boiled, but it was sparking, we then stupidly tried to push start it, this led to a brief combustion, however the bike quickly turned off along with the electronics.

I replaced the battery and regulator since, and my bike will not spark, the speedo will not read out, however the blinker indicator on the speedo works and my tail light works. Also the needles on the tach spin when the battery is first connected.
I checked all of my fuses and none of them were blown, I checked the front relays as well, and from what it appeared, they were fine.

Please help
 

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Sounds pretty nasty. Do you think the bad regulator was causing high voltage at the battery? Is this possible where the sparks came from?

You say it will not spark? Does it turn over? If it does, how does the voltage look at the battery while it is cranking. Holding same voltage? Enough voltage?

Have you given the bike a once-over looking for any burnt wires? Burnt connections?

Maybe some things to try.
- Disconnect the alternator and see if it will at least start.

I have the feeling the ECU may be fried. Computers don't like voltage variations much, especially high voltage or reverse polarity.:cry:

Sorry, that's all I got at the moment. I think you may need to do more diagnostics to find out what is receiving power and what is not.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds pretty nasty. Do you think the bad regulator was causing high voltage at the battery? Is this possible where the sparks came from?

You say it will not spark? Does it turn over? If it does, how does the voltage look at the battery while it is cranking. Holding same voltage? Enough voltage?

Have you given the bike a once-over looking for any burnt wires? Burnt connections?

Maybe some things to try.
- Disconnect the alternator and see if it will at least start.

I have the feeling the ECU may be fried. Computers don't like voltage variations much, especially high voltage or reverse polarity.:cry:

Sorry, that's all I got at the moment. I think you may need to do more diagnostics to find out what is receiving power and what is not.
When I hit the starter nothing happens, no cranking or the clicking you hear from the fuse area, I forget what its called. Also I began checking wires everywhere and connections and I haven't found anything burnt yet, where exactly is the ecu? I'd there a way to know that it is fried?

Also thanks for the response man!
 

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When I hit the starter nothing happens, no cranking or the clicking you hear from the fuse area, I forget what its called. Also I began checking wires everywhere and connections and I haven't found anything burnt yet, where exactly is the ecu? I'd there a way to know that it is fried?

Also thanks for the response man!
NP. I'm afraid you will quickly approach my knowledge limit.
What year and model of bike? Have you downloaded the service manual from this forum?

The ECU should be somewhere under the seat but you probably won't be able to see anything indicating it is fried. You may need to replace it with a used but working unit (eBay). But this could be big $.

You said you replaced the battery. Is it charged? What is the voltage across the terminals both in the bike and hooked up and on the bench. This might tell you if there is a short somewhere on the bike draining the battery down. If it is not charged then put a battery tender on it over night and then see if it will crank over in the morning.

BTW, when you mentioned "...it was sparking." did you literally mean sparks or did you mean ignition (i.e. spark plugs)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
NP. I'm afraid you will quickly approach my knowledge limit.
What year and model of bike? Have you downloaded the service manual from this forum?

The ECU should be somewhere under the seat but you probably won't be able to see anything indicating it is fried. You may need to replace it with a used but working unit (eBay). But this could be big $.

You said you replaced the battery. Is it charged? What is the voltage across the terminals both in the bike and hooked up and on the bench. This might tell you if there is a short somewhere on the bike draining the battery down. If it is not charged then put a battery tender on it over night and then see if it will crank over in the morning.

BTW, when you mentioned "...it was sparking." did you literally mean sparks or did you mean ignition (i.e. spark plugs)
I looked up used ECU's they're actually not a lot, less than 100. And when I said sparking I meant that the ignition was not functioning at all. Thanks a bunch too and hell you probably know more than I do lol. I'm so pissed that I messed her up right before the season
 

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Still kinda confusin us with the ignition. U said the needles move so Im guessing when u turn the key u actually get power to the bike. But when u press the starter button nothing happens...correct?
 

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Ok. I went back and read your OP. Forget the CPU for now. That won't be stopping it from cranking over. I think you need to check your voltages to try to find out why the starter is not cranking it over.
Then if you can get it to crank over but it won't start the CPU may become suspect.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok. I went back and read your OP. Forget the CPU for now. That won't be stopping it from cranking over. I think you need to check your voltages to try to find out why the starter is not cranking it over.
Then if you can get it to crank over but it won't start the CPU may become suspect.
What voltages should I check? The battery is new and I checked it before I put it in as it was a warranty replacement. The regulator is new from electro sport, I tested the stator and its in check, all the fuses are fine, even the starter fuse.
Im at work now, come tonight I'll be tearing everything apart and be able to give more details.
For now I'm just trying to get a feel for what's wrong.
What i don't understand is that before any electronics get fried, the fuse is supposed to blow, but they are all fine?
I'm starting to think maybe the wiring harness, I didn't have enough time to tear the bike apart before work.
I'll wait until I get home and really give everything a good look over.

I even put dielectric grease on all the electrical connectors after I got my regulator to try and make my charging system as healthy as possible lol.

I guess this is my Friday the 13th bad luck
 

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The fuses don't give as much protection as you might think. They are really there to protect the electrical system from one circuit that might fail as a short. Thus keeping one circuit that shorts out from pulling the whole electrical system down. If a component fails by burning quickly to an open the the fuse may not blow.

My thought here is that the failed regulator exposed the system and CPU to higher than normal voltages. The boiling battery was my clue. That can cause a variety of other failures that might not pull enough current to blow a fuse.

But at this time, it doesn't appear the starter system has enough power to crank the bike over. Even though the battery is new, does it have a strong enough charge to turn the motor over? With the battery in the bike, what is its standing voltage? More than 12V? Does this voltage drop when you hit the start button? If no, then check (or replace) the starter relay. If yes, then if the voltage drops too low the battery may need a charge.

Also, look for loose or corroded connections. Those can limit current to the starter.

Just thoughts for now. Good luck. Look forward to hearing about your discoveries. I'll check in tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The fuses don't give as much protection as you might think. They are really there to protect the electrical system from one circuit that might fail as a short. Thus keeping one circuit that shorts out from pulling the whole electrical system down. If a component fails by burning quickly to an open the the fuse may not blow.

My thought here is that the failed regulator exposed the system and CPU to higher than normal voltages. The boiling battery was my clue. That can cause a variety of other failures that might not pull enough current to blow a fuse.

But at this time, it doesn't appear the starter system has enough power to crank the bike over. Even though the battery is new, does it have a strong enough charge to turn the motor over? With the battery in the bike, what is its standing voltage? More than 12V? Does this voltage drop when you hit the start button? If no, then check (or replace) the starter relay. If yes, then if the voltage drops too low the battery may need a charge.

Also, look for loose or corroded connections. Those can limit current to the starter.

Just thoughts for now. Good luck. Look forward to hearing about your discoveries. I'll check in tomorrow.
Thanks a bunch man! I'll try all of these suggestions. I'll keep you updated on my progress.
 

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Not trying to bust your chops.... trying to get the info to help you with your issue:

Question #1. How did you diagnose your electrical problems, when you started slapping new parts on the bike? From the sound of if, you didn't have a manual -- do you own a multimeter, and are you taking notes as you go?

Question #2. What was your indication that you needed a new battery?

Question #3. What kind of battery did you install? Is it an Li type, or a traditional lead/acid unit?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Not trying to bust your chops.... trying to get the info to help you with your issue:

Question #1. How did you diagnose your electrical problems, when you started slapping new parts on the bike? From the sound of if, you didn't have a manual -- do you own a multimeter, and are you taking notes as you go?

Question #2. What was your indication that you needed a new battery?

Question #3. What kind of battery did you install? Is it an Li type, or a traditional lead/acid unit?
I have a multimeter that I use, the battery was bad because it literally boiled all of its distilled water out, it would not hold any charge so it was warranty replaced. My old regulator I will admit I assumed was the culprit but I can do a resistance test in it to see if it is working properly. I did the resistance test on the stator and that checked out fine.
The battery is a normal lead acid AGM.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Dude u know u could test it out with the multimeter instead of buying a new one randomly.
Are we talking about the battery or regulator? I know I can test it, I was pretty confident about the situation that it was the regulator that was causing the issue. It was a cheap regulator and I wanted a name brand warrantied replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm not just buying stuff guys I only bought one thing which was the regulator? The battery was under its warranty so that was free.
 
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