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I bought my 2006 zx636 from someone, when I got it it had a new stator, rectifier and battery. I left a light on my bike and the battery died. So I charged it (not connected to the bike) on my car. I now now I wasn't supposed to do that but when I used it on my bike it worked and then died so I charged it one more time and was wondering why it died again. I then went and bought. A new battery because I didn't know I needed a trickle charger. But when I put the new battery on it will only starts. Few times before it's dead. I don't thinks it's the stator or recifier because their new. Does anyone know what it could be?
 

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Download the shop manual for your bike from this site for free. The instructions for troubleshooting charging system problems is very effective, and efficient.
 

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Next time your bike is running, measure the voltage at the battery terminals. It should be close to 14 volts.

If not close to 14 volts, then your charging system is busted.

If close to 14 volts, then you probably have parasitic drain even when the bike is off. Theres a test for that too.

Now go do some testing yo!!!
 

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Sounds similar to a problem I had on my 06, sounds like it isn't charging.

Mine didn't start so put a new battery in it started got 15 miles and died. Took it to a garage they put a new regulator, a spare working stator I had but couldn't find the problem (though do think they were taking the piss and ripping me off), and they eventually found a wire or something that was burnt out probably caused when something like the regulator failed (I can't be more specific as he was so vague about things as he had the bike for weeks).

So while you may have replaced the part that failed it may have caused damage elsewhere.
 

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You need to test everything and inspect everything. Firstly, if you didn’t see it with your own eyes you can assume the seller was full of shit.
Two, “new” doesn’t mean good. New Chinese garbage part or new GENUINE KAWASAKI? I’ll put money down he replaced with some garbage and not the real deal. Genuine stator and regulator is probably over $300-400+
 

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There's a time for everything. A time to laugh, a time to cry...


... ... A time to go with an eBay deal, a time to mourn and squeal.
... ... ... A time to score and take a knee, a time for Chinese, and a time for O.E.


And son, the electrical side of a motorcycle is most often the time to stay with in ours case, Kawasaki (O.E.M.). But it's just as true with Honda, Suzuki & Yamaha. I've now owned 3 of the Big Four, and through the school of hard knocks have (almost) always regretted buying an electrical component that wasn't Factory. Now with that said, I've had good luck with some non-OE items, because I bought said item from well know industry firms that ultimately produce products for the Big Four, or are well established in the automotive field.


Do as brothers Scorpi0, Gawernator, RJ, and KawasakiBrad have counselled, download the shop manual, spend the time quite literally chasing down every combination - if need be - to find the culprit. If you look for a 15-min cure, you are bound to plow through a lot of money chasing false-solutions.

You might even try going on bent knee to Rivers, but... before you do that you will need all of your data - names, time duration from install to failure, signs/symptoms, and take copious notes/pictures of your exact situation. In short, DO NOT WASTE THE MAN'S TIME!

If Rivers tells you to do something, follow it to the letter - no substitutions. Don't be afraid to ask Qs, but ask Specific Qs. If you don't like what he tells you and you go off in a different tangent, don't expect his help in the future. He works on bikes for a living - you are not going to find a better resource. But go this route only after you've performed the Trouble Shooting steps in the shop manual first. And again, have taken your notes and snapped your photos. He's a great guy, but he does not suffer fools well.
 

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I should mention that the manual doesn't spend a lot of time explaining the settings needed on the multimeter to make the required measurements. It presumes you know what the K Ohms means, compared to Ohms when measuring resistance.... and that you know the difference between ~Volts (AC) and --Volts (DC).

Another area that is very often overlooked by the unsuspecting neophyte electrical troubleshooter...... there are two sides to every circuit. The path from the battery to whatever it is that needs doing, and the return path. There must be a return, for the current to flow. Voltage without current is simply potential, not work. Current times voltage is Watts...... the measure of work.
 

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I have no idea how to test any electrical parts but I know to stick with oem and these guys can always help if you get stuck with the voltmeter
 

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I should mention that the manual doesn't spend a lot of time explaining the settings needed on the multimeter to make the required measurements. It presumes you know what the K Ohms means, compared to Ohms when measuring resistance.... and that you know the difference between ~Volts (AC) and --Volts (DC).

Another area that is very often overlooked by the unsuspecting neophyte electrical troubleshooter...... there are two sides to every circuit. The path from the battery to whatever it is that needs doing, and the return path. There must be a return, for the current to flow. Voltage without current is simply potential, not work. Current times voltage is Watts...... the measure of work.



Cmsubackword, you've saved at least $100 with this post alone. RJ pointed out critical must know data/facts in just a few words.

That's why it is a critical aspect of MC maintenance that you take notes. Often neophytes will tell themselves that they will remember specifics because they don't want to take the time to jot down information. That is simply a fool's path; start making good decisions from the beginning!

Let me put it another way: I have been riding trial/MX since I was in first grade. My dad made me take notes for each specific bike I've owned. I am now in my 50s. I have the Kawasaki PDF of the shop manual on my laptop computer's desktop; I also down loaded the '09 Race Manual - I ride a '15 - because there are specifics in there that are absent from the shop manual. To that I have over a dozen specific papers that I authored on specific applications that are quirky specifics unique to my 636.

For example pulling off F/R wheels from my previous CBR1000RR, R1s, 996S, 954RR, VFR750, etc are essentially the same, each bike's paper had things that made removal/installation just that little bit smoother/less frustrating. And I still reviewed each specific paper for a specific job that I'm doing. Because almost always there is a NOTE: to self, do/do not do, _____ (fill in the blank). And these various hints, reminders & cautions can save one multiples of hours!

At the end, when going to an authority person, such as Rivers, you'll have the exact data when they ask you questions to better help you resolve your problem - and they will ask!
 
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