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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering why they have them. Also mine has a yellow and a blue line but they are off center. Is that normal?
 

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Interesting question...I don't know the answer, but now I'm curious and would like to :bigthumb:
 

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I'm not sure about the colored lines but did you ever notice the stripe in the center of the tire that looks like it would be some sort of mold line? That's actually a thin strip of rubber that is there to dissipate static electricity and not a mold line. I just learned that about a month ago. I assume the colored lines are some sort of factory identification mark but don't know. Interested though. :)
 

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Found this on another forum. Not sure if it's true or not, but it sounds reasonable.

Lines on New Tires - RedFlagDeals.com Forums

Coloured dots and stripes - whats that all about?
When you're looking for new tyres, you'll often see some coloured dots on the tyre sidewall, and bands of colour in the tread. These are all here for a reason, but it's more for the tyre fitter than for your benefit.
The dots on the sidewall typically denote unformity and weight. It's impossible to manufacture a tyre which is perfectly balanced and perfectly manufactured in the belts. As a result, all tyres have a point on the tread which is lighter than the rest of the tyre - a thin spot if you like. It's fractional - you'd never notice it unless you used tyre manufacturing equipment to find it, but its there. When the tyre is manufactured, this point is found and a coloured dot is put on the sidewall of the tyre corresponding to the light spot.
Typically this is a yellow dot (although some manufacturers use different colours just to confuse us) and is known as the weight mark. Typically the yellow dot should end up aligned to the valve stem on your wheel and tyre combo. This is because you can help minimize the amount of weight needed to balance the tyre and wheel combo by mounting the tire so that its light point is matched up with the wheel's heavy balance point. Every wheel has a valve stem which cannot be moved so that is considered to be the
heavy balance point for the wheel.
As well as not being able to manufacture perfectly weighted tyres, it's also nearly impossible to make a tyre which is perfectly circular. By perfectly circular, I mean down to some nauseating number of decimal places. Again, you'd be hard pushed to actually be able to tell that a tyre wasn't round without specialist equipment. Every tyre has a high and a low spot, the difference of which is called radial runout. Using sophisticated computer analysis, tyre manufacturers spin each tyre and look for the 'wobble' in the tyre at certain RPMs. It's all about harmonic frequency (you know - the frequency at which something vibrates, like the Tacoma Narrows
bridge collapse). Where the first harmonic curve from the tyre wobble hits its high point, that's where the tyre's high spot is.
Manufacturers typically mark this point with a red dot on the tyre sidewall, although again, some tyres have no marks, and others use different colours. This is called the uniformity mark. Correspondingly, most wheel rims are also not 100% circular, and will have a notch or a dimple stamped into the wheel rim somewhere indicating their low point. It makes sense then, that the high point of the tyre should be matched with the low point of the wheel rim to balance out the radial runout.


What about the coloured stripes in the tread?
Often when you buy tyres, there will be a coloured band or stripe running around the tyre inside the tread. These can be any colour and can be placed laterally almost anyhwere across the tread. Some are on the tread blocks whilst others are on the tyre carcass.
For ages I thought this was a uniformity check - a painted mark used to check the "roundness" of the tyre. But I had a tyre dealer contact me with a far more feasible answer. The same tyre is often made with slightly tweaked specifications for different vehicles.
To easily identify these same labelled tyres when they are warehoused or in storage, different markings and stripes are used.
Sometimes stripes are added for huge bulk orders to various manufactures. Eg All the red outside stripes are for Toyota next week.This gives anyone in the warehouse a very quick visual check of the different types of tyres without needing to pull them all down and read the sidewall on each one.
As well as the colour, the actual position of the lines is something to take note of too. They're a measure of something called runout. Depending on how the belts are laid on the tyre during manufacturing, they can cause the tire to "run out" - to not track perfectly straight, but pull to the left or right. The closer to the centre of the tyre that these lines are, the less runout the tyre has and the straighter it will track when mounted on your car. So for example, if you were looking at your car from the front and you saw the coloured striped running around the right side of both your front tyres, the car would likely have a tendency to pull to that side. The best thing is to have the coloured stripes on opposite sides of the tyres for opposite sides of the car, so that the runout on each side will counteract the other and help maintain a good straight running. This is something that not many tyre fitting places know about or take any notice of. The obvious solution to having the stripes both on one side is to flip one of the tyres around, but that will only work if they're not unidirectional tyres. If they are unidirectional (and thus must be mounted to rotate a specific way) then you should try to find another tyre from the same batch with the stripe on the opposite side.
 

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Who cares they rub off in less than half a mile..
 
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