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Most manufacturers recommend replacing tires if they are 6 years old.
5 years. And the TC on a ZX6R is not going to save you - it has no intelligence about lean angles. It's also not going to do anything when you lose the front.
 

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5 years. And the TC on a ZX6R is not going to save you - it has no intelligence about lean angles. It's also not going to do anything when you lose the front.
The industry standard is 6 years not 5.

Traction control will only go so far but it will help in certain situations, but obviously not the front tire.

My Mustang came with summer tires from the factory and they absolutely sucked during the South Carolina winter which is very mild. I wouldn't use race/summer tires on a motorcycle during the winter months even with traction control but the summer months would be fine.

"The industry standard for replacing motorcycle tires is six years after their initial manufacture date. However, if kept in temperature-controlled storage, this shelf life may be extended a little"

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Most manufacturers recommend replacing tires if they are 6 years old. Maybe race tires have a shorter shelf life but I'm sure the OP will be able to determine if the tires are road worthy or not. Also, traction control will help control tire slippage to a certain extent.

Good write up OP and keep that traction control on at all times. Let us know how they compare to the old tires and how many miles you get out of them.

I have over 4k on my road 5 and they look and perform excellent. I imagine you will get maybe 2k out of those Metzeler tires?
I bought these tires knowing in advanced that they may be older date codes. But also stored in a climate controlled warehouse. It did not bother me at all. The tires were never in question at all. I paid $100 bucks for a $300 dollar tire. I was more or less just sharing my experience with changing and balancing my own tires for the first time.


As for the tires, they are ridiculously sticky. Like super grip on the street. I started out at 30 psi, TC was off, after a very easy going ride to break them in a little the temp was still 158F on the back tire after just a very quick ride, that was after I parked the bike and put it on the rear stand and then checked the temp. They heated up very quickly, and stuck to the road like hot glue. The tires feel super soft even at room temp. I would never put a hard tire, or super old tire on my bike. Not to mention The S22’s that came off were also (3 years old)

I think these are absolutely amazing tires! :cool:

I was never expecting long life, but then again.. It was only $100 bucks. If truly find my self so cannot live without another one, I’ll buy another at regular price I suppose.

Arm Tire Automotive tire Tread Gadget

Land vehicle Fuel tank Helmet Automotive fuel system Automotive tire
 
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Man I've been in this position before, thinking I got a good deal and I was excited to share it then learned that I actually made an uninformed decision and probably shouldn't have done so. I dont have money coming out of my ass, but if I were in this position I'd probably switch to something tried and true like a Q3+. I love dual compound tires since I ride upright more often than not.

Either way, I'm sure these tires aren't as evil as everyone is making them out to be. Have a good time and enjoy the ride!
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
Man I've been in this position before, thinking I got a good deal and I was excited to share it then learned that I actually made an uninformed decision and probably shouldn't have done so. I dont have money coming out of my ass, but if I were in this position I'd probably switch to something tried and true like a Q3+. I love dual compound tires since I ride upright more often than not.

Either way, I'm sure these tires aren't as evil as everyone is making them out to be. Have a good time and enjoy the ride!
I came out okay on this one, I bought the tire knowing in advance it was 3 years old but kept in climate controlled warehouse. Also, this is a dual compound rear tire. This tire is absolutely amazing, just stay away from wet conditions with it.
 

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I bought these tires knowing in advanced that they may be older date codes. But also stored in a climate controlled warehouse. It did not bother me at all. The tires were never in question at all. I paid $100 bucks for a $300 dollar tire. I was more or less just sharing my experience with changing and balancing my own tires for the first time.


As for the tires, they are ridiculously sticky. Like super grip on the street. I started out at 30 psi, TC was off, after a very easy going ride to break them in a little the temp was still 158F on the back tire after just a very quick ride, that was after I parked the bike and put it on the rear stand and then checked the temp. They heated up very quickly, and stuck to the road like hot glue. The tires feel super soft even at room temp. I would never put a hard tire, or super old tire on my bike. Not to mention The S22’s that came off were also (3 years old)

I think these are absolutely amazing tires! :cool:

I was never expecting long life, but then again.. It was only $100 bucks. If truly find my self so cannot live without another one, I’ll buy another at regular price I suppose.

View attachment 111601
View attachment 111602
I figured the tires would be fine this time of year. My Mustang came with summer tires and they stuck like glue to the road until October, then things started to get slippery.
 

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The industry standard is 6 years not 5.
For Metzeler it is even less.

Motorcycle tires are covered for the life of the tire, 4 years from the manufacturer Date Code or until the tread depth reaches 1/32".
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
For Metzeler it is even less.

Motorcycle tires are covered for the life of the tire, 4 years from the manufacturer Date Code or until the tread depth reaches 1/32".
A lot of manufacturers claim 10 year shelf life.


Revzilla tested 7 year old tires compared to brand new tires, and they were the same apparently,

 
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The fact is you bought race tyres...don't expect sympathy when you have an off.
 
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The industry standard is 6 years not 5.

Traction control will only go so far but it will help in certain situations, but obviously not the front tire.



"The industry standard for replacing motorcycle tires is six years after their initial manufacture date. However, if kept in temperature-controlled storage, this shelf life may be extended a little"

.
FWIW..............

As a side note............... This was a recent change by Dunlop (and likely other tire manufacturers) as they found about 2 years they had lots of "old" inventory...... D404's, E3's, GPR300's etc sitting in distributor warehouses many people were unwilling to buy (I was one of those people refusing to buy tires on the cusp of aging out)

They had said 5 years and no notation of "properly stored could extend that" up until I believe late 2020.....

That said everyone of the warehouses I get my tires from that I have been to, "distributor warehouses"... ( so two in MN, 1 in WI ) .... I would not call climate controlled as they have alll the Overhead Doors open and big fans circulating air for staff- but huge temp swings and humidity swings.....pretty much just like the temps and humidity changes outdoors sans obviously they have huge heaters running blowing hot air all winter long up here in the northland
The most local distributor, only 10 miles away.......... they had their tire racks right in front of two of those heater units, so the tires took the brunt of the heated blow.......... imagine how that hurt the tires, heated hot air blowing on them for likely 14 hours a day for 6+ months out of the year

I have ridden on brand new 5 year old plus tires.......... Hell I purchased that warehouses entire inventory of 8 year old brand Dunlop D207's GP variant, some sort of race variant...... back in the day............ only paid $40 per tire, turned and sold them all that year at $50 per tire except the 2 sets of them I burned off
1 set went to AR and lasted exactly 940 miles and 3 days to worn out....... about the only real bad thing I noticed from them---how stiff they were to mount, how hard they felt (could not leave a fingernail mark in them) and the first 100ish miles they inspired zero confidence and felt slippery.......... once scuffed through the surface hardness of age and oil evaporation (because at the first gas stop I could then leave a fingernail mark in the tire) they worked well enough for the pace we were riding (which was not race pace but was a quick pace and saw leaning them to the edge in nearly every corner)
the other set were on the bike for about a month or so, ridden locally here in sconnieland and tight technically dirty and challenging turns and made it through about 2000 miles (4 sundays in a row of 450-550 mile days)...... On the day of install I rode the bike the 120ish mile round trip down to welch and back to scuff them in and get them ready for what I knew was going to be a rowdy crowd of near trip digits the next day......... that 1st southery pass through welch was hair raisingly scary as fuck with how much push both ends had and how bad the traction level, heading back north through welch was significanlty better- but not great, headed south and then north one more time each way and it finally got to be an acceptable tire to be at/close to max lean......... It never once inspired any confidence in traction throughout its life but it was rideable and at a $80 investment in 2009 money......... I would not have done it again with what I found out doing this............ (2009 money brand new Q2's were only about $150 a set after their 6 months of rebates they had going.......... that 150 would have been far better money spend than the 80, as those Q2's routinely got me 4500ish miles and stuck atleast 5x better throughout the life of the tire)

a couple of the buyers of these from me were trackday junkies and took them to the track....... the feedback I got from them was similar with they wasted 2 or 3 sessions just trying to get them to work enough to even ride close to mid group pace........ one of them said he pulled out his surform (like a cheese grater) and went over the whole tire on front and rear on all 3 sets he bought and thought they worked great ....

So results can vary, opinions differ and what someone expects and thinks is like asking what oil works best.....

I see plenty of bikes (great white north average is only about 1100 miles per year on motorcycles) that arrive with worn out 8-10 year old tires finally getting new tires........ people are blissfully unaware of how bad the traction level really is for their tires that sat in the garage through thousands of heat cold cycles with exhaust fumes and other pollutants amongst the deteriation factors aging the tires, not to even mention the wicking out of the oils into the concete floor....... ever notice that black spot on the floor where you park you bike daily???? the oils from the tires being sucked right out of them!!!!!!
 

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For Metzeler it is even less.

Motorcycle tires are covered for the life of the tire, 4 years from the manufacturer Date Code or until the tread depth reaches 1/32".
That is a warranty statement which is not the same as shelf life when stored correctly.

The tires appear to be working as expected and in good working order according to the OP. Being race tires the grip will fade in the fall but in the hot summer months they should perform as expected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
FWIW..............

As a side note............... This was a recent change by Dunlop (and likely other tire manufacturers) as they found about 2 years they had lots of "old" inventory...... D404's, E3's, GPR300's etc sitting in distributor warehouses many people were unwilling to buy (I was one of those people refusing to buy tires on the cusp of aging out)

They had said 5 years and no notation of "properly stored could extend that" up until I believe late 2020.....

That said everyone of the warehouses I get my tires from that I have been to, "distributor warehouses"... ( so two in MN, 1 in WI ) .... I would not call climate controlled as they have alll the Overhead Doors open and big fans circulating air for staff- but huge temp swings and humidity swings.....pretty much just like the temps and humidity changes outdoors sans obviously they have huge heaters running blowing hot air all winter long up here in the northland
The most local distributor, only 10 miles away.......... they had their tire racks right in front of two of those heater units, so the tires took the brunt of the heated blow.......... imagine how that hurt the tires, heated hot air blowing on them for likely 14 hours a day for 6+ months out of the year

I have ridden on brand new 5 year old plus tires.......... Hell I purchased that warehouses entire inventory of 8 year old brand Dunlop D207's GP variant, some sort of race variant...... back in the day............ only paid $40 per tire, turned and sold them all that year at $50 per tire except the 2 sets of them I burned off
1 set went to AR and lasted exactly 940 miles and 3 days to worn out....... about the only real bad thing I noticed from them---how stiff they were to mount, how hard they felt (could not leave a fingernail mark in them) and the first 100ish miles they inspired zero confidence and felt slippery.......... once scuffed through the surface hardness of age and oil evaporation (because at the first gas stop I could then leave a fingernail mark in the tire) they worked well enough for the pace we were riding (which was not race pace but was a quick pace and saw leaning them to the edge in nearly every corner)
the other set were on the bike for about a month or so, ridden locally here in sconnieland and tight technically dirty and challenging turns and made it through about 2000 miles (4 sundays in a row of 450-550 mile days)...... On the day of install I rode the bike the 120ish mile round trip down to welch and back to scuff them in and get them ready for what I knew was going to be a rowdy crowd of near trip digits the next day......... that 1st southery pass through welch was hair raisingly scary as fuck with how much push both ends had and how bad the traction level, heading back north through welch was significanlty better- but not great, headed south and then north one more time each way and it finally got to be an acceptable tire to be at/close to max lean......... It never once inspired any confidence in traction throughout its life but it was rideable and at a $80 investment in 2009 money......... I would not have done it again with what I found out doing this............ (2009 money brand new Q2's were only about $150 a set after their 6 months of rebates they had going.......... that 150 would have been far better money spend than the 80, as those Q2's routinely got me 4500ish miles and stuck atleast 5x better throughout the life of the tire)

a couple of the buyers of these from me were trackday junkies and took them to the track....... the feedback I got from them was similar with they wasted 2 or 3 sessions just trying to get them to work enough to even ride close to mid group pace........ one of them said he pulled out his surform (like a cheese grater) and went over the whole tire on front and rear on all 3 sets he bought and thought they worked great ....

So results can vary, opinions differ and what someone expects and thinks is like asking what oil works best.....

I see plenty of bikes (great white north average is only about 1100 miles per year on motorcycles) that arrive with worn out 8-10 year old tires finally getting new tires........ people are blissfully unaware of how bad the traction level really is for their tires that sat in the garage through thousands of heat cold cycles with exhaust fumes and other pollutants amongst the deteriation factors aging the tires, not to even mention the wicking out of the oils into the concete floor....... ever notice that black spot on the floor where you park you bike daily???? the oils from the tires being sucked right out of them!!!!!!
I bought these tires from moto garage, they are an authorized retailer for Metzeler. They also have a tire specials section, and coupon codes too which is where they sale these toddler aged tires. Not sure if you’re familiar with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I just received the front tire. Date code (4119) So not quite 3 years old, just like the rear tire. It feels very sticky, and soft. I swear it feels just like a brand new tire.

I got this tire for $80 dollars. Looks brand new, and feels brand new. Considering it is normally $220 or so. I’ll take it!!!


Tire Plant Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Tread

Textile Sleeve Automotive tire Flooring Floor
 

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Like the write-up about changing the tires. Got me thinking about it but nah - I'm old and lazy haha. On my sport touring bike I've been swapping tires a couple of times a year. Could benefit from doing it myself but buy my tires at Cycle Gear (try and support the local folks) and it doesn't cost that much to get them mounted when you buy from them. I have a mini tire changer from Harbor Freight. Used it to change scooter tires and riding more tires - wow what a hassle!

As for the soft tires please be careful. Back in 2013 I bought a new 2012 CBR600RR with the OEM tires. At 42F over a mile from my house I sun the rear making a left turn at a traffic light. Was not going fast or leaned much but it stepped to the side at least 6". It was a small and very gentle roll on the throttle. Another time getting on the interstate in the rain I rolled on the throttle at 70 mph in 3rd gear out of the meat of the power band and not a hard or aggressive roll on the throttle and the rear spun. There I was dirt tracking onto the interstate as I gently rolled off to try and not make things worse. After I got home I got in my car and went to Cycle Gear and bought tires - think it was Michelin Pilot Road 3s which aren't track tries but great street tires in all weather conditions. For inexpensive tires look at the Shinko's.

People on here are not pounding on you but care about you and don't want you to go down - we all want you to have fun and enjoy your bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Like the write-up about changing the tires. Got me thinking about it but nah - I'm old and lazy haha. On my sport touring bike I've been swapping tires a couple of times a year. Could benefit from doing it myself but buy my tires at Cycle Gear (try and support the local folks) and it doesn't cost that much to get them mounted when you buy from them. I have a mini tire changer from Harbor Freight. Used it to change scooter tires and riding more tires - wow what a hassle!

As for the soft tires please be careful. Back in 2013 I bought a new 2012 CBR600RR with the OEM tires. At 42F over a mile from my house I sun the rear making a left turn at a traffic light. Was not going fast or leaned much but it stepped to the side at least 6". It was a small and very gentle roll on the throttle. Another time getting on the interstate in the rain I rolled on the throttle at 70 mph in 3rd gear out of the meat of the power band and not a hard or aggressive roll on the throttle and the rear spun. There I was dirt tracking onto the interstate as I gently rolled off to try and not make things worse. After I got home I got in my car and went to Cycle Gear and bought tires - think it was Michelin Pilot Road 3s which aren't track tries but great street tires in all weather conditions. For inexpensive tires look at the Shinko's.

People on here are not pounding on you but care about you and don't want you to go down - we all want you to have fun and enjoy your bike.

Honestly, I should have left the tires out of the photo. I don’t drive my bike in the rain or cold weather at all, it’s the summer time and this tire will be done in 60 days anyways.

Also, the last guy said I’d get no sympathy if I went down :D

God forbid If such a thing happen, the last place I’d share that would be here Lol.
 

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Honestly, I should have left the tires out of the photo. I don’t drive my bike in the rain or cold weather at all, it’s the summer time and this tire will be done in 60 days anyways.

Also, the last guy said I’d get no sympathy if I went down :D

God forbid If such a thing happen, the last place I’d share that would be here Lol.
Gravity, thou art a heartless bitch……
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
UGH did I miss something?...I came here to see/read about the BALANCING of the TIRE. I do not see/or read anything about your balancing of the tire:/
Mechanical balancing is very easy.

First you want to set your mechanical balancer up perfectly level on a flat surface.

Next you’ll mount a complete wheel/tire on the balancing rod with the same amount of bar/rod exposed on each side so the tire is perfectly centered left to right on the balancer.

Let the wheel roll until it stops, then repeat to confirm it stops at the same spot. The portion of the tire near the floor, is the heaviest part of the tire and wheel.

Add a weight to the opposite side, or the side that’s highest up. and repeat this process until the wheel does not roll at all, no matter which position it’s in.

The wheel and tire should always stay completely still without rolling forwards or backwards once balanced. Because the wheel is now the same weight in every spot, it will not move not matter of its position.

Just an FYI, once you mount a tire, make sure to find the color painted circle dot/mark on the tire which indicates the “Lightest part of the tire” you want this light spot painted mark to line up with the valve stem on the rim. Lightest part of the tire goes on the heaviest part of the rim. Once this is done, it’s practically already balanced honestly. And also make sure your tire rotation is correct as well.


I have never balances a tire before, but I have since done my rear tire and front tire. This bike is butter smooth all the way to triple digit speeds. It rode better than new. It’s really surprising how simple this process is.



Automotive tire Crankset Motor vehicle Hood Bicycle part
 
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