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Discussion Starter #1
I really want to try the R10's for track days, but I can't decide if I want to get them. Main reason is because I don't have tire warmers. I know Bridgestone recommends using warmers on them. Anybody have any experience or advice how they run without warmers? They would be on a 03' 636.
 

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No warmers just means it'll take a couple laps to get up to temp. Heat cycles comes into play also as your tires will cool back down when you pit.

There's a good article Korey posted about something similar, "When to go from Q2 to race tires". It essentially says you don't stand to loose anything, only gain from going to race tires. However without warmers you will need to hit a couple laps before going balls deep. In other words, don't attempt to dive into turn one straight outa the gate. You'll end up on your ass.
 

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I should also add, it's your track time man. Renting warmers (or buying warmers) buys you those first two or three laps you loose / have to take it easy on.
 

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No warmers just means it'll take a couple laps to get up to temp. Heat cycles comes into play also as your tires will cool back down when you pit.

There's a good article Korey posted about something similar, "When to go from Q2 to race tires". It essentially says you don't stand to loose anything, only gain from going to race tires. However without warmers you will need to hit a couple laps before going balls deep. In other words, don't attempt to dive into turn one straight outa the gate. You'll end up on your ass.
^^^^^^ This

Set them at 27psi front and 24psi rear (cold)
 

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someone correct me if I'm wrong but don't race tires have a limited amount of heat cycles before the rubber totally deteriorates as well? like a finite amount unlike street tires which are made to go hot/cold/hot/cold
 

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someone correct me if I'm wrong but don't race tires have a limited amount of heat cycles before the rubber totally deteriorates as well? like a finite amount unlike street tires which are made to go hot/cold/hot/cold
Correct. I brought that up... but you just added further details.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys. Soon as the wife lets me buy some warmers will definitely get them. I'm going to get The R10 and take it easy the first few laps. I mainly just want to see how these feel before going to slicks. I do not know the R10's had heat cycles. I thought he cycles only affected slicks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
^^^^^^ This

Set them at 27psi front and 24psi rear (cold)
Brands6R. I see you fitted a 2012 rear shock on your bike. How does that work out
 

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Brands6R. I see you fitted a 2012 rear shock on your bike. How does that work out
It's a massive and noticeable improvement over the tired old standard shock and has high & low speed compression damping. Obviously not as good as an Ohlins/Maxton etc, but considering it only cost me just over £100 (versus £600-£1000) it's much cheaper and seemed a better option than getting the old shock serviced.

It was a relatively straight forward swap too.
 

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All tires have heat cycles.. Some are made to deal with them better than others. Slicks and DOTs (R10s) will have a limited amount of heat cycles until they are done. But a Dunlop Q3 could take as many heat cycles as you can throw at them and be fine.

As far as running R10s without warmers:

Moto USA tested the R10s. They put warmers on them and weren't even getting them to the optimal temperature Bridgestone recommends (200*). This means your probably looking at more than a couple laps to have them at optimal temp.

The R10s are awesome, I just mounted my second set. If your going to spend the money on them you might as well do it right and get warmers. That way you get to actually ride as soon as you get out on the track (I could drag knee first corner If I wanted) but also you can put the warmers on as soon as you come off track and it keeps the tires in one heat cycle which prolongs the life of the tire.
 

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I used to race on the R10. Although I did use warmers for racing, there has been a time or two that the circuit tripped or forgot to turn them on, etc. When I coach, I don't use warmers at all, and I am on used up race rubber. This time of year you will be fine for TDs without them. As already said, just don't try winning the track day on lap 1. Take 2-3 laps at a moderate pace, gradually turning it up. The rubber temperature is not so much the issue as is inflation. The carcass will flex more at lower pressures and allows the tire to fold. Speaking of inflation, go ahead and start at 27/24 but check them hot off the track. They should be around 30/31. When I say "hot off the track" I don't mean to pull back in the pit and take off your helmet first. I mean pull over on cold pit and check them immediately after the session ends. You can lose up to 2 psi by pussyfooting the last lap and pulling into your paddock. If they are high, purge some air to the correct pressure. If low, add that much air when you pull into your paddock.
 
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