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Question to track racers, day trippers, stop and go traffic commuters, ect. A guy on a local forum despise to use Engine Ice in his bike. He has said he has raced with it and melted his motor at the track. He has also said he has seen other friends melt their motor with engine ice. Also claims the engine has a 500 degree boil over point, which the website says otherwise. He has said he will only use 50/50 coolant from now on.

Have any of you ever heard of engine ice melting a motor at the track or out riding on public streets or canyons?

What does everyone run for coolant? 50/50, engine ice, ect? and what conditions are you in to run whichever coolant type you desire? And which coolant is suited better for track days to street riding. Can Engine Ice be used for track and street riding?
 

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Question to track racers, day trippers, stop and go traffic commuters, ect. A guy on a local forum despise to use Engine Ice in his bike. He has said he has raced with it and melted his motor at the track. He has also said he has seen other friends melt their motor with engine ice. Also claims the engine has a 500 degree boil over point, which the website says otherwise. He has said he will only use 50/50 coolant from now on.

Have any of you ever heard of engine ice melting a motor at the track or out riding on public streets or canyons?

What does everyone run for coolant? 50/50, engine ice, ect? and what conditions are you in to run whichever coolant type you desire? And which coolant is suited better for track days to street riding. Can Engine Ice be used for track and street riding?
500 degree boil over point??? Lol, that dudes full of shit.

Alot of people use straight engine ice. I personally use water wetter with distilled water. They will both cool better than an ethylene glycol solution. Some track day organizers and roadracing clubs will only allow you on track with engine ice or water wetter with distilled water.


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I run Engine Ice in all of my bikes never had an issue. Just had a track day yesterday where it was 97 degrees. I was flogging the bike all day in that heat and she’s still alive.


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Discussion Starter #6
I am not sure we the guy despised engine ice. But also would not give any full details of how he saw engines literally melt on the spot at the track.
 

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Alot of people use straight engine ice. I personally use water wetter with distilled water. They will both cool better than an ethylene glycol solution.
Can someone point me in the direction of some testing on this? Ethylene glycol mixes have significantly better cooling capacity than water does yet I have seen this claim before that water wetter and water cool better and it seems very dubious to me.


Mark
 

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Can someone point me in the direction of some testing on this? Ethylene glycol mixes have significantly better cooling capacity than water does yet I have seen this claim before that water wetter and water cool better and it seems very dubious to me.


Mark
Sounds more like a dirty marketing ploy.
 

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I'm betting no better than glycol bases..... they're outlawed on the track because of how slippery they are. Not because 'wetter' is better at cooling.
 

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Can someone point me in the direction of some testing on this? Ethylene glycol mixes have significantly better cooling capacity than water does yet I have seen this claim before that water wetter and water cool better and it seems very dubious to me.


Mark
I remember reading somewhat the opposite at some point, that glycol mixes didn't have the ability to absorb or disburse heat as quickly as pure water does. It wasn't a massive difference but it was there. The idea of water wetter or other similar additives is reducing the surface tension of water (like soap does) to make the water "wetter" and easier to absorb heat and provide lubricity to water pumps as well as have some anti-corrosion properties.

IIRC the only reason a glycol mix would cool "better" is because of the higher boiling point, but in a pressurized cooling system boiling shouldn't be an issue as long as things are working correctly.

🤷‍♂️

I run antifreeze in my street vehicles and distilled water + additive in anything that will be on a track.
 

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I'm betting no better than glycol bases..... they're outlawed on the track because of how slippery they are. Not because 'wetter' is better at cooling.
I understand that, but I keep hearing about how terrible glycol mixes are compared to the newest and most wonderful, yet I have never seen anything approaching a scientific test showing it.


IIRC the only reason a glycol mix would cool "better" is because of the higher boiling point, but in a pressurized cooling system boiling shouldn't be an issue as long as things are working correctly.
I understand the idea behind water wetter and it is sound, but I have yet to see testing that shows it is any better than glycol. A higher boiling point is still a plus, as it prevents local boiling at hot spots that really screw up the heat transfer into the coolant.


Mark
 

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I understand that, but I keep hearing about how terrible glycol mixes are compared to the newest and most wonderful, yet I have never seen anything approaching a scientific test showing it.




I understand the idea behind water wetter and it is sound, but I have yet to see testing that shows it is any better than glycol. A higher boiling point is still a plus, as it prevents local boiling at hot spots that really screw up the heat transfer into the coolant.


Mark
I don't remember where I read it, some technical forum many years ago. Someone posted a white paper type thing that demonstrated glycol mix vs water and the difference in the rate of heat absorption and heat shedding in a cooling system. Pure water was the winner, but by such a low margin that I don't really think it would matter in all but the most extreme operating conditions. Maybe the whole thing was BS though. 🤷‍♂️

Water Wetter or like additives may do what they claim and lower cooling system temps, or not. I don't really care if they do nor have I observed any difference vs pure water. I run water + additive simply for the lubricity and anti-corrosive properties.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I understand that, but I keep hearing about how terrible glycol mixes are compared to the newest and most wonderful, yet I have never seen anything approaching a scientific test showing it.




I understand the idea behind water wetter and it is sound, but I have yet to see testing that shows it is any better than glycol. A higher boiling point is still a plus, as it prevents local boiling at hot spots that really screw up the heat transfer into the coolant.


Mark
What the guy on my local page stated is, engine ice has a very high boiling point, therefore his and other people’s motor had no signs or warnings of boiler over until the motors literally started melting at the track. He claimed engine ice has 500 degree boil over which is nonsense. When the manufacturers website says 250degrees I believe.
 

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I have been using engine ice for maybe 4-5 years at this point and my bike is street/track and I have had zero issues. I was at Putnam Park this last weekend and it was hot on Saturday and it ran like a top.
 

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Has anyone asked the guy why he and others at the track didn't notice their bike running at an extreme temp like that? They never noticed it before the bike went catastrophic? He can claim that bikes are torched by Engine Ice all he wants, but it seems rather stupid to me that neither himself nor others are catching an extreme engine temp during a track day..
 
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