Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
09 zx6r
My regulator went bad. So I replaced it and the stator. Now the bike will crank but won't start and is blowing ecu fuse when I turn key on. When the bike died it had high voltage and when the engine died I could hear a loud constant tone under the seat im guessing I fried the ecu. Does anyone know of a good way to test it before i find a replacement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,219 Posts
Do you know if the service bulletin was ever performed on your '09? Kawasaki replaced the R/R @ no cost.... I'm guessing you have an advanced case of why they did so.

Either your relay assembly took the hit, or the ECU, as you're popping that fuse..... But I would more strongly expect melted wiring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you know if the service bulletin was ever performed on your '09? Kawasaki replaced the R/R @ no cost.... I'm guessing you have an advanced case of why they did so.

Either your relay assembly took the hit, or the ECU, as you're popping that fuse..... But I would more strongly expect melted wiring.
Idk when I got the bike I asked about the regulator but he didn't know. I had a phone charger with a volt meter on it and it was fine then it jumped to 18v on the way home and it fried the battery and apparently the ecu. The wire shouldn't be melted from 18v but I'm going to go through it and I ordered a used ecu and relay assembly this morning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,219 Posts
It's not the voltage, but the amount of current that flows through it. The insulation protects up to some voltage, yes. It does so for some amount of current flowing through the wire. different diameters of wire have different resistance for a given length. Tiny wire cannot handle big currents because they heat up too much and melt the insulation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's not the voltage, but the amount of current that flows through it. The insulation protects up to some voltage, yes. It does so for some amount of current flowing through the wire. different diameters of wire have different resistance for a given length. Tiny wire cannot handle big currents because they heat up too much and melt the insulation.
Yes but the higher the voltage the lower the amperag
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,219 Posts
Yes but the higher the voltage the lower the amperag
This is true, if the amount of work to be done is as intended. If the load has changed from OEM the amount of current that needs to flow may change as well. Particularly if there is a short.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top