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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! Finished up putting down coats of paint on my plastics. First time trying the process. Wanting to get a good clear coat down. Is there a reason to go with aerosol vs a standard brush type applicator? The lacquer should swim and level itself so I can’t imagine brush strokes would be an issue, but I’ve only ever used it on wood projects so wasn’t sure. Any thoughts?
 

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Hey guys! Finished up putting down coats of paint on my plastics. First time trying the process. Wanting to get a good clear coat down. Is there a reason to go with aerosol vs a standard brush type applicator? The lacquer should swim and level itself so I can’t imagine brush strokes would be an issue, but I’ve only ever used it on wood projects so wasn’t sure. Any thoughts?
I have to think spray would apply a much thinner coating than brush. There are a number of folks here that have used an alternate clear coat system which is gasoline resistant. Supposed to be much superior to lacquer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I suppose it would be thinner. I looked at the Spraymax 2k that seems to be suggested often. Just not sure I want to deal with the hazmat constraints.
 

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2K is the one that seems to be preferred….. I’m a little cautious for those hazmat concerns, and the fact that once you mix it, use or lose is the only option.
 

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When I repaired crash damage on my ‘09 left side fairings, I chose to go with colorite, as they offered a complete primer, base, and clear rattle can kit, which also included tacky cloth, and multiple grades of sanding media.

There was adequate supply of each media to accomplish what I wanted to do, the color match is spot on, and I knew the layers wouldn’t react to each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When I repaired crash damage on my ‘09 left side fairings, I chose to go with colorite, as they offered a complete primer, base, and clear rattle can kit, which also included tacky cloth, and multiple grades of sanding media.

There was adequate supply of each media to accomplish what I wanted to do, the color match is spot on, and I knew the layers wouldn’t react to each other.
Awesome! Thanks for the info! I’ve already put down all the paint, but I’ll check out colorite for the sealer!
 

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The colorite sealer is not on par with the 2K, by all accounts. I haven’t had an issue with it yet, but my painted parts are at relatively low risk for fuel damage. It’s been working for 2 years so far, with the bike kept in my garage when not being ridden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah I get that. I think I’ve only gotten fuel on my plastics maybe once in 10 years lol. I do want a coat that can deal with weather without much issue, but I feel like any automotive type top coat should be able to handle that. I was kinda just hoping to find one I could paint on purely because it’s easier for me to start/stop and not IDLH my garage 🙃
 

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My grandpa used to paint his VW bug with a paint roller...

As far as the op, you want to protect against cleaners and brake fluid, brake cleaner, whatever you clean your chain lube off with etc too...not just fuel--but yeah one may get a couple droplets of fuel on the tank when filling, but I can't really see any time you would get fuel on the plastics..........

I used the 2k glossy clearcoat when I painted bodywork and tank, I went through about 55%-60% of the can in a single pass and within 30 minutes did a second coat to finish off the can....... did that 3 times for a total of 6 coats of clear...... I doubt anything is getting through the clear ( I had purchased 3 cans unkowing how far they would spray and figured I would just use it all up)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Okay yeah I can see how there are a number of other chemicals and oils that you need to protect your paint from.

How was your experience with the 2k? Did you need a respirator? If I did it outside, will a bit of wind cause any issues, especially seeing how hazardous it is? Did it self level easily or did you have to be careful to not have runs?


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Did mine in my "paint room" (I have a 8x12 room inside my 1100sf garage, I stain and laquar pool tables and cabinets in there on occassion, the main garage is heated and air conditioned)

the ventilation in there is not awesome.... just two bath vent fans sucking air out at 70cfm each- mounted in the cieling and then 6 of my old 20x25x4 merv 13 air filters from my furnace for new "fresh" air to draw in from, stuck in the wall near the floor (feeble attempt to keep most of the air coming in clean).... really I should have installed a much more serious fan to remove air, at atleast 700cfm so I could turn the air over atleast once per minute--but with what I have in there- I can physically see the airborne particles going up to the fans---and I do have to clean the fan blades and housing about every 3 or 4 uses as the get covered and less effective....

I wore a respirator.... a 3m dual filter unit I wear when also doing the woodworking stuff.. it worked well...sure I could still smell the stuff some, but not any more than the duplicolor paints I also used or the varnish/urathane/stains I use on the woodworking end of things.. I mean at about $30 why wouldn't you wear protection???

As far as runs etc- yeah like any product you have to be aware of how thick you put it on and get good coverage over all of it but not super thick, thus the layers........ several thin layers are far better than a couple thick payers.... regardless if spraying it on or brushing it on

I also did it in a very low humidity and about 73* environment (winter time in Minneshithole with the garage heated, I did have one of the windows cracked open for fresh air draw from the far garage stall- air that had to roll right across the woodstove before getting to the filters and ultimately into the "paint room"

the room is far from air tight, it has a 1" gap under the door even .... and.... I had to walk in and out of the room several times during my entire process of painting and clear.allowing even more "dirty air" into the room......so I had some minor dirt/dust in the paint and the clear, but pretty minor.... atleast no bugs like the trackbike that was done in summertime

The problem with doing it outside is bugs and dust and dirt........ but if you aren't that concerned with imperfections then outside would be fine--- I would not do in high humidity or more than just a slow breeze day though...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow! What a setup! Thank you for the very thorough explanation! I have zero ability to control humidity or many environmental effects, other than by closing my garage door. As for humidity….I’m in ******* riviera FL, so it’s pretty much +80% humidity and a bit windy every day.

Kinda one of the other reasons for a brush on type application is so that I can distribute it exactly where I want, without wind effects.

I’m okay with minor imperfections (really no other way to be about it given my lack in ability to create an environment where “imperfection-free” is possible ). Sounds like outside with a respirator, on the least windy day is what’s going to work best.
 

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Did you need a respirator? If I did it outside, will a bit of wind cause any issues, especially seeing how hazardous it is?
If you are spraying any kind of paint you need a respirator/mask. The droplets themselves are hazardous, besides the chemicals involved. As riverszzr says, for $30 why wouldn't you take the precaution? You want filters that are for organic vapours/compounds, if you can smell the paint the filters aren't working and you are still breathing the fumes.

Spraying from a rattle can in anything beyond an extremely light breeze will give crap results. You end up with an uneven coat and most likely dust particles and bugs stuck to your work. If you stand with your back to the wind it will carry the solvents and droplets away from you, but the solvents and fumes are still not healthy and you can get a dose that way, too. I know of one guy who routinely sprayed epoxy paints outdoors without a mask (he was painting radio controlled boats, so not big projects for hours on end) and he ended up in the emergency room after he got enough isocyanates in his system to cause him to pass out one day. It took a while for it to build up enough, but he got there eventually.


Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Interesting. Hadn’t ever heard that isocyanates could build up like that over time…seems odd. But I do agree that offgassing is certainly something to be considerate of which is why I asked. All of the rattle cans I’m using do not contain isocyanates. Which is why they do not have any warnings indicating the need for a respirator. Just good ventilation and to avoid breathing vapors. The crazy warnings on the 2k bottle gave me concern and I wanted to know what others thought (some people on the internet or like “nah bro, what’s safety? Californians are crazy” ) I’ll look into getting a respirator.


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I did the tank cover on my 2012 CBR600RR with the SprayMax 2K. Stuff is great. I had one small spot that wasn't perfect so sanded and polished it. WOW is that stuff tough/hard! If you are going to sand I recommend doing it next day so before it gets harder. When finished it was indistinguishable from the other panels that were OEM.

Sprayed it outside on a nice day with very little wind and no bugs to speak of. Kept the pets inside and nobody was near me outside. Bought a 3M respirator that is P100 - when COVID hit my son who was a resident took it and used it in the hospital when they were having trouble gettin protective equipment. Wore a tyveck jacket and gloves in addition to the respirator. All to keep isocyanates exposure to a minimum. My goal was no exposed skin - probably had some around my face but kept it as small as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Good deal! Tell your son thanks for all that he does!

Ive got some coveralls ghat should do the trick for bodily exposure. Alrighty, ordered the 2k and respirator! Depending on the weather I’ll knock this out this weekend and post up pics when it’s done!


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I'll pass the thanks along.

I found that doing it the recommended way (what me follow directions!) worked well. 1st coat just a faint coat, second coat about covered and third coat on somewhat thick. It was better about not running than other paints Ive used.
 

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Aerosol.. your can sand out imperfections between coats... I would do this indoors if possible to to avoid wind dust etc.
 

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oh and a couple of incandescent bulbs help it cure/set between coats. I did some serious rebuilding of part of my fairing...I didn't even try to repair with color(would require metal fleck...then color...then clear) I painted the damage areas black (with a patterned-ish stencil) , then some clearcoat to seal it off. I later finished off covering the rest of the damage with machine cut hexagon vinyl .I abandoned this initially because I had to handcut the hexagons...but after I discover a friend had a Cris-cut machine...I continued...
Grille Hood Blue Automotive lighting Azure


this is what it looks like after 7years being painted AND parked OUTSIDE in the sun!
 
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