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Just got my first bike, it’s a 2022 model with ABS, any tips on how to ride would be appreciated or any beginner gear. The bike has some after markets stuff already from the previous owner. The bike only has 1,000 so it should be broken in already.
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2022 ZX-6R KRT ABS
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266 Posts
Nice! You might want to double-check you really have ABS -- you should see a yellow ABS LED just under the green "N" LED on the dash when you turn on the ignition -- there has been a ton of dealer confusion about that, unfortunately (or possibly someone removed your KIBS sticker)?
 

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2018 z900rs, 2021 cb1000r, 2013 zx6r
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That is a very serious potent bike for a person who is looking for advice on how to ride. Take more than just the msf course, practice on quiet roads, go slow. Get the basics to be second nature, shifting, counter steering, braking. Slowly work your way up to faster roads/highways. Take a course on track on how to handle the bike properly in a closed course environment. Always wear all the gear, a slow speed crash will still likely result in injury and there are not many second chances for faster speed crashes. For the first while don't ride with others, and when you do don't ever push yourself to keep up, your buddies will wait at the next gas station or whatever, same goes in reverse don't try to push others to ride faster than they are comfortable with. One of the most dangerous times is when you've been riding for a month or so and you start to think that you are good and you start to relax, stay vigilant at all times, accidents happen quick when you are not expecting them thats why its so important for things like emergency braking and swerving to be second nature and just happen naturally. Learn about lane positioning, nobody who has been riding for any amount of time will laugh or look down on riding cautiously, you will see in a few years when you notice new riders riding above their ability, not wearing gear, or just generally squidding how cringe and stupid it looks to be hooning on a bike that they don't know how to control yet. Good, fast and safe riding takes time to develop, don't rush it, it takes time and practice. Also keep up with the maintenance on your bike, check tire pressures, keep it clean because everytime you clean it you are kind of doing a visual inspection of things, keep your chain clean and lubed, sometimes bolts can vibrate loose, it doesn't hurt on a rainy day sometimes to look things over and make sure they are snug. Remember to have fun, motorcycles for most of us give a feeling of freedom and stress relieving, there is nothing better than a nice set of flowing corners with the feel bike and the sound of the engine all working together.
 

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2005 ZZR-600
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72 Posts
Hey Otown, you said a lot and said it very well!

And to Hoesway, congrats on your purchase, that looks like a great bike!!

I would not recommend a bike this nice as a first ride, but that of course is your choice and I wish you well. I believe the statistics are, most new riders are going to have a tip-over of some sort in their first 6 months. (I certainly did.)

Best of luck!
 

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Nice bike and congratulations!

Great advice from @Otown. Get good gear, good doesn't have to be expensive. But make sure the jacket has CE Level 2 pads. A year ago bought a Reax jacket which came with nice pads but I like the almost new set I had so swapped them out. Gave them to someone who didn't have pads for their jacket. They hit a car that ran a stop sign and were bashed up pretty badly BUT their elbows and shoulders were OK thanks to the pads I'd given them! They were CE Level 2. The Reax jacket isn't expensive but is nicely made - not a track jacket but for street riding it is good. I figure one slide in a textile jacket is all it's good for but a jacket is lots less than an ER visit and pain, well I'd spend a lot to avoid that! Same for helmets and gloves. Most important is good fit - don't buy a used helmet and take care of your helmet (says the fella who is rocking a AGV K6 he dropped on a concrete floor from waste high). Don't forget boots and knee protection. 6 years ago I crashed a scooter at 15MPH in Italy by clipping the right bar on a rock wall! Shattered kneecap, concussion, scrapes and bruises. No gear and a scooter helmet worn improperly. Only lost bottom quarter of kneecap but the surgery and recovery was very painful. I still ride a scooter and generally wear my airbag vest helmet and gloves but it's on slow city streets so not as dangerous I tell myself.

Don't know where you are from but my neighborhood is fairly hilly. Pulling up to a stop going uphill and then turning onto a street which is also sloped can be very tricky. When I was first learning to ride I was nervous about those intersections but made myself slow down and think about it as I approached - keep the bike vertical even if one foot is closer to the ground than the other and then when leaving give it a good amount of throttle and slip the clutch. First get good at stoping and taking off on level ground then stopping and turning then uphill stops and starts. It pays off and stays with you. Last August as I was leaving the campground in Calgary Canada the parking lot was a fairly steep grade up to a road the sloped up at a fairly good grade to the right. My bike was loaded so lots of weight. Knew if I screwed it up it would be a very quick spill and a long way from home! Gave it plenty of throttle and carefully slipped the clutch and made it with no drama but did have an elevated heart rate. For me one of the more challenging parts of riding a sport bike was low speed maneuvers. Practice practice practice
 

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2004-20-23 636
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😲. Sweet. Congrats . Check out Dan the fireman’s videos on YouTube. He has a ton of beginner advice and makes it entertaining

my advice. Start out in low mode on traction control 3 As much as you’re gonna want to try full power and no traction control If this is your first bike don’t! Take plenty of time to get your road skills. Low power and 3 will make the bike very manageable for you. Please don’t rush it. We loose to many first time bikers to rushing yourself. Everytime you get on this thing leave your ego at home. Someone passes you or calls you slow or ribs you for keeping it in low power mode just remember your family and the people whose life you will destroy if you get killed and keep it on low. Goodluck and stay safe.
And as mentioned I don’t think they make the abs bikes except in the krt. But that doesn’t matter. The non abs bikes tend to hold their value better for some reason. I personally don’t like the abs. Traction and low power is enough to keep first time riders safe. Relying on abs when most other bikes you will ride isn’t imo isn’t the best way to learn anyways
 

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Congrats on the new bike! I just picked up a 2023 ZX-6R Non-ABS to turn into a track bike.

Ditto what Otown said. I would add that as a new rider and you now have the bike is that you avoid riding in urban areas. Intersections are by far your most challenging and dangerous situations on two wheels. Get away from cars as much as possible. Invest in track time after you have learned to be comfortable being on two wheels. The track is no place for a fresh, new motorcycle rider. Avoid riding in rush-hour (whatever that is now), & don't ride at night. Don't look down (ever). Nothing good happens when you take your eyes off the road and traffic.
If possible, ride with someone who has a lot of road and track time; they will be of immense help, but I know that is a hard find. Read, read, read. There is a ton of good books out there, some better than others for new riders.
Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques is a great reference. Practice your braking in a traffic-free area. When you feel comfortable riding in good weather, go out in the rain and slow everything down (apart from your brain). Do some long trips and avoid highways (crap on a sportbike) and just spend time on bike. I have a Garmin Zumo XT (brilliant for finding backroads).

P.S. Sorry for all the 'Dont's!'.
 
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2005 Kawasaki ZX6R
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Take the classes that are offered in your area if possible, if not then at least download the motorcycle driving mock test and make sure you know the info on that. it covers all the basic "what would you do if..." scenarios. Also, honestly when my husband taught me to ride the classes in my area were backed up for years essentially, due to covid but he had me watch "A Twist of the Wrist". The movie is like 3 hours long but it was really informative.
 
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