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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. First post :)

I’ve recently bought a brand new 2019 zx6r KRT. As far as I can tell from research, it has a slipper clutch.

Now I’ve never ridden a bike with a slipper clutch before, however I have owned several Super and Suoersport bikes in the past (this is my first return to bikes in over ten years) and was semi competent at blipping and downshifting so no major drama.

Problem is, so far as I can tell, it doesn’t seem to be very “slippy”. To be honest it feels exactly the same as my last bike that didn’t have one (2005 CBR600RR).

Two part question:

1) Can someone confirm it does actually have one and I haven’t made a mistake?
2) Does it only work in a particular rev range? I’m still running in for context and so not caining it. Anyone have one too and can comment.

Thanks.

David.
 

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Hi all. First post :)

I’ve recently bought a brand new 2019 zx6r KRT. As far as I can tell from research, it has a slipper clutch.

Now I’ve never ridden a bike with a slipper clutch before, however I have owned several Super and Suoersport bikes in the past (this is my first return to bikes in over ten years) and was semi competent at blipping and downshifting so no major drama.

Problem is, so far as I can tell, it doesn’t seem to be very “slippy”. To be honest it feels exactly the same as my last bike that didn’t have one (2005 CBR600RR).

Two part question:

1) Can someone confirm it does actually have one and I haven’t made a mistake?
2) Does it only work in a particular rev range? I’m still running in for context and so not caining it. Anyone have one too and can comment.

Thanks.

David.
Yes, it has a slipper clutch. Works well at the track and I haven't had the rear lock up on me. I would imagine that it doesn't do much in the lower RPM range.
 

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1) yes
2) the function is related to load, rather than RPM directly:

Back torque is greatest in the lowest gears, same as 'forward '. Chop the throttle at high speed in second, drop a gear and pop the clutch without revving the motor and the engine compression will refuse the change in shaft speed much more than in higher gears. Skidding, squirming, wheel hop can occur.

The slipper function is initiated by that force, and consists of a simple set of ball bearings in ramped grooves. The rear wheel 'backwards' load twists the plate one side of the groove is cut into. That twist is translated into a jacking motion, that levers the pressure plate away from stack of pressure and friction plates. 'slip' is induced. Purely analog anti-lock technology, and very subtle in operation. Spring tension alone dictates how much force initiates the function.

Because the wheelbase is so short, and how easy that makes it to do a stoppie on these things, the impact of having or not having a slipper function is limited in street use.

Stuffing the bike into a corner at max lean while trying to maximize pending drive out of that same corner may require a ham fisted down shift while making use of that last inch of rubber on the shoulder of the tires. Electronic quick shifters that work on a down shift exacerbate the impact......
 

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Discussion Starter #4
[

Thank you for such a detailed response. I really appreciate it.

Guess we will see when we get to the track 😈

QUOTE=RJ2112;1834138]1) yes
2) the function is related to load, rather than RPM directly:

Back torque is greatest in the lowest gears, same as 'forward '. Chop the throttle at high speed in second, drop a gear and pop the clutch without revving the motor and the engine compression will refuse the change in shaft speed much more than in higher gears. Skidding, squirming, wheel hop can occur.

The slipper function is initiated by that force, and consists of a simple set of ball bearings in ramped grooves. The rear wheel 'backwards' load twists the plate one side of the groove is cut into. That twist is translated into a jacking motion, that levers the pressure plate away from stack of pressure and friction plates. 'slip' is induced. Purely analog anti-lock technology, and very subtle in operation. Spring tension alone dictates how much force initiates the function.

Because the wheelbase is so short, and how easy that makes it to do a stoppie on these things, the impact of having or not having a slipper function is limited in street use.

Stuffing the bike into a corner at max lean while trying to maximize pending drive out of that same corner may require a ham fisted down shift while making use of that last inch of rubber on the shoulder of the tires. Electronic quick shifters that work on a down shift exacerbate the impact......[/QUOTE]
 

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The slipper is really meant to keep the chassis stable over a wider range of conditions than it would be, without. It has a much bigger impact on high compression motors with less cylinders.... a typcial Vee twin has nearly as much cc in one cylinder, as we have spread across all four. The ability of the engine to cause the rear wheel to skid is much greater, there.

The OEM unit is mostly okay -- the track day junkies and racers will tell you that more can be had, for more money. When you get into slicks, and tracks that you can use the whole thing it may be a good idea to upgrade, then. I don't think it likely I would ever need to do so, given my use.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So do you still blip down on the street then? Or lean on the slipper?

The slipper is really meant to keep the chassis stable over a wider range of conditions than it would be, without. It has a much bigger impact on high compression motors with less cylinders.... a typcial Vee twin has nearly as much cc in one cylinder, as we have spread across all four. The ability of the engine to cause the rear wheel to skid is much greater, there.

The OEM unit is mostly okay -- the track day junkies and racers will tell you that more can be had, for more money. When you get into slicks, and tracks that you can use the whole thing it may be a good idea to upgrade, then. I don't think it likely I would ever need to do so, given my use.
 

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I just slip the clutch on downshift. I stopped blipping the throttle with last two bikes, that I used (Tuono V4) and use now (ZX-6R 2019) on the track.
 

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So do you still blip down on the street then? Or lean on the slipper?
Always blip. It’s good practice. Especially after reading Twist..
 

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Sidenote:

Wtf is happening when I have to come to a quick stop, I clutch in, and my tranny makes a clicking noise? I try to downshift while stopping 99% of the time. Seems as though the tranny is never fully disconnected from the final drive? Is it chain slap (it’s properly adjusted)?
 

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Sidenote:

Wtf is happening when I have to come to a quick stop, I clutch in, and my tranny makes a clicking noise? I try to downshift while stopping 99% of the time. Seems as though the tranny is never fully disconnected from the final drive? Is it chain slap (it’s properly adjusted)?
^^master link? Kink in chain? Bad front sprocket?
Kinky tranny :O
 

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Hi all. First post :)

I’ve recently bought a brand new 2019 zx6r KRT. As far as I can tell from research, it has a slipper clutch.

Now I’ve never ridden a bike with a slipper clutch before, however I have owned several Super and Suoersport bikes in the past (this is my first return to bikes in over ten years) and was semi competent at blipping and downshifting so no major drama.

Problem is, so far as I can tell, it doesn’t seem to be very “slippy”. To be honest it feels exactly the same as my last bike that didn’t have one (2005 CBR600RR).

Two part question:

1) Can someone confirm it does actually have one and I haven’t made a mistake?
2) Does it only work in a particular rev range? I’m still running in for context and so not caining it. Anyone have one too and can comment.

Thanks.

David.
The Kawi slippers, stock, still have a good bit of engine braking to them. You can adjust them to your flavor, but in comparison, my old flashed R6 felt like a 2 stroke when you would down shift at high RPM's (The engine would just scream more and more, but the clutch release did nothing to slow it down). You just aren't riding it hard enough and down shifting at high enough RPM's to notice it. To be honest, on a street bike, you shouldn't really notice much of a difference either, because if you are, you are cruising for a bruising.
 

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The Kawi slippers, stock, still have a good bit of engine braking to them. You can adjust them to your flavor, but in comparison, my old flashed R6 felt like a 2 stroke when you would down shift at high RPM's (The engine would just scream more and more, but the clutch release did nothing to slow it down). You just aren't riding it hard enough and down shifting at high enough RPM's to notice it. To be honest, on a street bike, you shouldn't really notice much of a difference either, because if you are, you are cruising for a bruising.
That sounds like a sweet ride
 
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