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Discussion Starter #1
I Ride a 2019 Model,

Any recommendation for the front & rear suspension settings? i find the stock setting soft for me...

My Height is : 5'6"
Weight is : 200lbs or 92 kilos

Thanks!
 

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Hey what’s up? I actually just got mine and to me the rear suspension feels jacked up do you know if there’s a way to lower it ? Mine actually feels pretty good not too soft or hard but the seat feels like it’s sitting too high
 

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Hey what’s up? I actually just got mine and to me the rear suspension feels jacked up do you know if there’s a way to lower it ? Mine actually feels pretty good not too soft or hard but the seat feels like it’s sitting too high
What’s your inseam?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey what’s up? I actually just got mine and to me the rear suspension feels jacked up do you know if there’s a way to lower it ? Mine actually feels pretty good not too soft or hard but the seat feels like it’s sitting too high
i'm 5'6" ang the stock height is just right for me... my concern is the stocks forks settings are soft for me as i weigh 200lbs or about 91 or 92 kilos
 

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i'm 5'6" ang the stock height is just right for me... my concern is the stocks forks settings are soft for me as i weigh 200lbs or about 91 or 92 kilos
You’ll need to try and adjust your sag measurements using your preload adjusters. Then you can adjust the rebound and compression damping. The place to start first is always to get the appropriate springs that allow reasonable sag numbers. I don’t know what the stock spring rate is for your bike, but typically it is less than optimal for us “200 pounders!” I have 1.0 kg/mm straight rate springs in my forks for the track. Maybe at a lesser pace on the street the stock springs would have been okay, but you never know since everyone’s riding habits are unique.
 

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its very likely a bit too soft for you- but you must attempt to set sag to figure that out. There are numerous guides available, and youll need at least one friend to help- two to make it simple. If you can NOT get the sag to an acceptable number then you will have to consider a respring.

As far as the comp/rebound numbers- you want the bike to react in a balanced fashion front and rear to begin with, or it may feel like a pogo stick in front or rear. SHove down on the bike hard in front, then on the tail and try to adjust so it returns and compresses at a similar rate. Easier said than done without practice.
If you are truly bottoming out your suspension travel it could be a safety issue, but I doubt you are. look up the zip tie method for front forks to verify. For the rear shock you can often read the travel by the oil line on the shaft- can google that too.

finally- it probably doesnt matter a whole hell of a lot if its too soft or not balanced if youre not riding at a pace where you are putting a ton of force into the bike anyway. :O
 

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yes, im not bottoming out the front forks, my zip tie is half inch away the front forks, i tried to add i ful. turn to the preload, ill test it this weekend...
 

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yes, im not bottoming out the front forks, my zip tie is half inch away the front forks, i tried to add i ful. turn to the preload, ill test it this weekend...
You can’t count on saying that if upper fork tubes don’t bottom out on the lower castings that you are not bottoming out the forks! You have to find out what the full fork travel is, then raise the from of the bike off the ground to fully extend the forks, and then measure out the fork travel and mark bottom-out on the chrome (I use a permanent “Sharpie” marker; some tape would work). My ‘12 has I believe 120 mm of fork travel and that means, in my case, that the forks bottom out with about a half inch of chrome still showing.
 

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These guys are correct. You may have a mechanical bottom before the upper fork tube hits the casting on the bottom. I have a Slacker tool to measure sag. Takes measuring mistakes out of the equation. Racetech.com can tell you through a prouduct search what rate springs you have and what you need. They are a bit aggressive in their spec of spring rate. Measure sag first, back compression out to half way. Use push method to first set rebound damping. Push hard on fork and let it rebound without resistance, and it should take 1 second to rebound but not go back down and occilate. Same with rear. Then rebound will be close, go ride the same piece of road over and over to set compression damping with zip tie. Good luck.
 
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