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People routinely run gear oil in the hot months but it is still a messy pigsty of shit.....

All of it will fling, science !!! no getting around centrifugal forces and fling....... if you could put something on that would not fling it also would not flow out the oiler or a can of aerosol spray lube
This, I know.

My question is what is the absolute lowest rate of application a scot oiling system can be set to, above zero. I’d bet a drop of oil on the chain every 30 minutes would likely be a good number when touring. No two drops are going to hit the same spot on the chain. Just a matter of wetting each link at least once in a month or more, imho.

Barring really shitty conditions like the ALCAN highway or some such. Thousands of miles of gravel roads or off road conditions need more chain support. Constant rain/winter conditions, too.

the trade off between chain life and fling seems like it should be an option to go to far less oil applied….
 

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I am not sure you fully understand how they work......... they are vacuum operated, or the electronic version is hooked directly to your battery and you cannot "shut them off" or even get to a zero flow rate or even close...
even at idle at a stoplight they are dripping oil

maybe the latest gen 3 model is better or maybe some other manufacturer is better but ....... all the scott oilers I have seen to date even at their 'lowest flow rate" drop too much oil.........
 
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I know zero about the Scott oilers. Do they drip oil on the outside of the chain or the inside?


Mark
 

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I am not sure you fully understand how they work......... they are vacuum operated, or the electronic version is hooked directly to your battery and you cannot "shut them off" or even get to a zero flow rate or even close...
even at idle at a stoplight they are dripping oil

maybe the latest gen 3 model is better or maybe some other manufacturer is better but ....... all the scott oilers I have seen to date even at their 'lowest flow rate" drop too much oil.........

I understand that they are total loss oiling systems, which are incredibly simple in design and execution.

As I understood it, the oil is fed to an applicator pad, which is nearly in contact with the chain just above the lower run just before the rear sprocket.

When the pad is wetted, some oil is wiped onto the chain when contact is made as the chain reacts to changes in load and suspension action.

that pad need not be soaking wet, simply more damp than the chain.

the vacuum or electronic metering system should only allow oiling to occur when the chain is in motion, and ideally would be proportional to the velocity of the chain. Whatever the delivery rate is, it would ideally be 10 times faster at 100 than it is at 10.
 

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The one I have uses a small tube to put the oil on the rear sprocket. I ordered the scorpion adapter which is a $29 piece of plastic with a y connector in it so that there are 2 outlets - one on each side of the sprocket. They actually touch the sprocket just inside the teeth so that when a drop of oil drips it gets flung onto the chain. Thus lubricating the O-rings and getting some on the pins. I ran the red oil and in the 4,500 miles it worked I did not need to refill it. It is a little sticky but nothing like chain lube. the way it flings off does get rid of dust and grit though - that is get rid off the chain but gets all over the rear wheel and other stuff. I'm more fond of it now as it kept the chain lubed nicely and I didn't have to worry about remembering to spray chain lube on the chain at the end of a long day or riding.

Pity it worked out that I rode across Minnesota on a Sunday or I would have figured out how to stop by @riverszzr shop and asked him if he could clean my rear wheel :)

My bike is totally filthy and not helped by the oil on the rear wheel. Yes it is easier than spraying chain lube and after 6,200 miles the chain would have been nasty if it hadn't been cleaned so overall I would say it is good but know it is going to be messy.

I messed up my planning and in an 18 day trip turned out I had one day I that I did not travel and that was 1/3 of the way. Had a little break late in the trip when I only had to go from Laramie to Cheyenne but managed to turn a 49 mile ride into a 200 mile day. LOL took a side road going into Cheyanne that went thru a state park. Missed the turn at the beginning and didnt realize it. Headed down a road that had a cattle crossing (those pipes in the road). I had hit the gas and was doing maybe 50 when I went across it. It was at the crest of a rise and I did not realize until I was on it that the pavement on the other side was gravel!!!!! LOL kept it straight and used the rear brake to get the speed down to creep speed. Had to ride it to the bottom of the hill before I found a good turn around. Another adventure was in Montana leaving Red Lodge headed to Cody WY to go to Yellowstone for the day. 2 lane road with a 70 MPH speed limit. Came up on a pickup that was going 65 as we were coming up on a truck pulling a camper trailer. It was nice and straight so pulled out to pass using my turn signal and motored by the pickup. Looked over when I was almost beside him and notice in 18" high letters on the side it said Sheriff! Looked down and saw 87 on my speedometer but went ahead and passed and pulled over using my turn signal. He didn't come after me so after a while I passed the truck pulling the camper and carefully went on. Heart rate took a little longer to come down haha.
 

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I know zero about the Scott oilers. Do they drip oil on the outside of the chain or the inside?


Mark
Depends on which rendition and which head you have.
they have one that has a single applicator that only drips on the outside of the roller, another that drips on both outside and inside-so both sides of the chain are equally over lubed....
 

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I wanted to drill down on this a bit more, their most expensive system (V3.1) is adjustable between one drop every 20 seconds and one drop every five minutes. Even that seems pretty high, depending upon the size of the drop and how viscous their oil is. The claim is max 1500 miles between refills (based on a drop size of .023 ml applied at 1 drop per minute @17C. Their documents indicate flow is also affected by the tip of the applicator; standard part is a slash cut... I'd expect that a flat tip would flow a bit less as there would be higher surface tension holding the drop to the tip.


 

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I was expecting to have to refill the system but didn't after 6,200 miles so musth have been getting a lot less drops per mile. I've got to give the bike a through cleaning and carefully inspect the chain as well as inspect the nozzles and see how they did.

My trouble is at the end of a day of riding I'm tired and too often tend to not lube the chain like I should. For chain lube other than the Scottoiler I like the spray on no fling lube which really needs to dry overnight. However after several days of application without cleaning then the chain can get a lot of buildup. So Scottoiler is better as it makes a mess but does carry away dirt and grit buildup.

I would like the better (more $) version but when I bought mine they were out of stock (it's the 2021 theme)
 

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I was expecting to have to refill the system but didn't after 6,200 miles so musth have been getting a lot less drops per mile. I've got to give the bike a through cleaning and carefully inspect the chain as well as inspect the nozzles and see how they did.

My trouble is at the end of a day of riding I'm tired and too often tend to not lube the chain like I should. For chain lube other than the Scottoiler I like the spray on no fling lube which really needs to dry overnight. However after several days of application without cleaning then the chain can get a lot of buildup. So Scottoiler is better as it makes a mess but does carry away dirt and grit buildup.

I would like the better (more $) version but when I bought mine they were out of stock (it's the 2021 theme)

Al,

There were quite a few qualifiers in the statements made on the site, which make it obvious that there is significant variation in what is applied on any given chain. The purely analog systems will produce a lot more excess (IMHO) oil as they cannot make any adjustments on the fly. Very similar in principle to a carburetor, a simple device which works very well within the limited range of parameters it can be set up for. Better to err on the side of greater flow than the opposite condition. (If the customer doesn't see anything flinging off the chain, do they really believe the system is working?)

Just like with FI, the basic job is still the same, there's just greater control of the excess. I can appreciate applying the oil immediately in front of the rear sprocket, so the oil hits the teeth and from there is spread across the rollers. The more surface the oil hits, the longer it will take to be flung away. As the chain typically advances on the sprocket so that any roller interacts with every tooth of both sprockets over time I can understand the oil film being applied to all sprocket teeth and all the rollers.
 
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