Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Going to do spark plug swap for the very first time ever on a bike. Appreciate any tips or tricks. Seems pretty straightforward according to service manual.

As far as what tool to use, I need a 16 mm deep socket correct? Manual says not to use a wrench but I guess I need to use a socket anyway to properly torque.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,663 Posts
Have you ever changed the plugs in anything else?

Same thing. Just remember you're working with an aluminum block. So don't overtighten the plugs. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Your tool kit that came with the bike should have the spark plug socket tool and you can use a a torque wrench on that to tighten them properly. I believe it's 115 inch lbs. Also i just prop the tank up and secure with a bungee cord instead of removing it. After you install the new plugs be sure the stick coils are seated properly and you feel them snap back down fully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
The most difficult time you will have is removing the spark plug caps. Only because they have never been removed before. Other than that, it's pretty easy. I removed that tank entirely because it's easy to take off and I just wanted to get it out of the way while working on the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
879 Posts
RedandBlack : if possible take pics along the way and make a write up when you're done. i want to change mine as well and if you can make it any easier on me that'd be great ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: mwager

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,110 Posts
RedandBlack : if possible take pics along the way and make a write up when you're done. i want to change mine as well and if you can make it any easier on me that'd be great ;)
Kawasaki was kind enough to provide you with a spectacular write-up in the service manual. There really aren't too many servicing tasks that are this straightforward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yea it was pretty easy probably because I've already taken off the airbox already so I knew what to do with that.

The only pain in the ass was the stick coils. I could not get them out and then after a Google search, someone mentioned wrapping the coil heads with rubber hose. So I just so happened to have a thin rubber hose laying around, and used that to pull the coils out.

I'll have an update later as well as what my plugs looked like after 8500 miles. Gotta finish putting my plastics back on. I did oil and coolant as well and going from track fairings back to street fairings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Your tool kit that came with the bike should have the spark plug socket tool and you can use a a torque wrench on that to tighten them properly.
Maybe 2013+ stopped providing these? I did not see any tool in there that could assist with this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Ok so for anybody that stumbles upon this, this is what my spark plugs looked like after 8500 miles. The manual recommends changing at 7500 but I had heard that people were removing spark plugs that looked pretty good at 7500 so I didn't stick strictly to this schedule and did it when it was convenient after my trackdays.

The service manual was pretty helpful. You'll have to reference a bunch of different sections for each of the removal stages but found following the service manual to be fairly straightforward.

A few tips:

I recommend full gas tank removal and obviously if you go this route, you should have a pretty empty gas tank. The gas tank is fairly easy to remove on this bike and it is definitely worth it to do the extra steps to remove it.

Hose removal can be a pain in the ass from both the gas tank and airbox. I disconnected the hose leading to the charcoal canister (California model) at the charcoal canister female connection and left it connected to the gas tank because I had so much trouble trying to pull that hose free. Almost all the hoses gave me trouble. The hoses for the airbox I did last and essentially pulled the airbox free from the hoses instead of the hoses free from the airbox. It wasn't pretty but I was able to do it.

The worst part of the spark plug change is removing the stick coils. They are in there pretty good and it is hard to get leverage on them. What I did was wrap a thin rubber hose around the heads of the stick coils and used one hand to pull up on them while using my other hand to turn the sticks coils left and right until they pulled free. I seriously could not see myself being able to pull them free without doing this. I'm sure its possible, but the lack of leverage makes it extremely challenging.

You need a 16 mm deep socket along with a socket extension bar (at least 6 inches) to remove the spark plugs.

You need a torque socket wrench capable of 115 inch pounds to install the new spark plugs

My spark plugs would not pull up out of their little hole with just the socket wrench. I had to use a telescoping magnet to lift them free after they were completely loose. Without this, I'm not sure how I would've got the spark plugs out.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,262 Posts
My spark plugs would not pull up out of their little hole with just the socket wrench. I had to use a telescoping magnet to lift them free after they were completely loose. Without this, I'm not sure how I would've got the spark plugs out.
I carry a telescoping magnet for exactly that. Most of the time the plugs stay in the head after unthreading them.
If you get an actual spark plug socket, it has a rubber device inside of it that grips the top of the spark plug and keeps it in the socket while you lift it out. It also makes it easier when you put the new spark plugs in. Just snap them into the socket and use the socket and extension to slide them down and thread them into the block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
679 Posts
The worst part of the spark plug change is removing the stick coils. They are in there pretty good and it is hard to get leverage on them. What I did was wrap a thin rubber hose around the heads of the stick coils and used one hand to pull up on them while using my other hand to turn the sticks coils left and right until they pulled free. I seriously could not see myself being able to pull them free without doing this. I'm sure its possible, but the lack of leverage makes it extremely challenging.
Yeah, so you had the same experience. It gets easier the second time around since you were the first person to pull the caps since they were installed in japan. I had a hell of a time pulling, but not obviously wanting them to break off in the head. By the 4th cap, I was frustrated more so than I have been working on my bike or any bike I have owned. There just isn't any leverage!
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top