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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a 2007 ZX6R from a buddy, and when he had the chain replaced by the dealership, they did it wrong and it ended up flying off doin 100mph. The bike was fine, for the most part, but when it came off the chain gouged a decent sized hole in the plastic under the rear seat. Today I took it back to the dealer for him so they could replace the piece, and when they pulled the old one off, they discovered a sizeable chunk of it melted away, near where the E.V.A. is. The guy at the parts desk said that the initial guess is that the flapper valve isn't opening properly and causing the issue, and I was wondering if anyone else has experienced this problem. If it helps, before I got it, somebody hit it in the parking lot and it tipped on it's side, I'll attach pictures, but since it fell on the right side and the valve is on the right side I was wondering if that could have caused a problem, even though the frame slider took the brunt of it. In the first picture you can see where the toolkit plastic has melted too, and how the top part is missing a decent amount of plastic. the second pic shows the damage from it being hit.
 

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If the butterfly valve in the muffler wasnt opening, you would feel a big loss of power.

Is the muffler bent to that side or something?
 

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It takes heat to melt the plastic...... Was it dripped into the pipe? Where did that plastic go?I

Either the section of exhaust closest to that point was bent towards the melted area, or the exhaust is running hotter than normal, or both. How does the bike run? What modifications have been done?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If the butterfly valve in the muffler wasnt opening, you would feel a big loss of power.

Is the muffler bent to that side or something?
I didn’t notice it being bent any particular way, and the exhaust should all be stock, but it is lowered 2”. As far as power difference, I probably would be able to tell if there was much of a loss, because this is my first 600, going from a Suzuki gz250. But I mean it feels really fast, so I guess there’s not much of one
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It takes heat to melt the plastic...... Was it dripped into the pipe? Where did that plastic go?I

Either the section of exhaust closest to that point was bent towards the melted area, or the exhaust is running hotter than normal, or both. How does the bike run? What modifications have been done?
When I rode the bike last, it got up to 170, which seemed pretty normal, although I did notice it get noticibly worm when I went to get off. It’s lowered 2” but other than that stock I’m pretty sure. I’m gonna call today and see if there’s any new news.
 

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Coolant temperature and exhaust has temps are not in the same category..... At the head, exhaust gas temps can be over 1000 F. When the exhaust goes through the catalytic converter, the temperature is raised further.

The state of tune of a motor contributes as well. When the combustion process consumes all of the fuel in the charge, there is no fuel left to evaporate. The gasses are at their hottest possible state. This is called running lean. A charge with left over fuel can be various states of 'rich'.. Far better for all concerned with the engine's health, as the left over fuel evaporates and cools the gasses.

Kawasaki knows that, and designs their OEM set-up to meet emissions requirements. The OEM configuration is as lean as Kawasaki can make it. Piggyback fuel management systems cheat and trick the ECU into adding more fuel so there is more available to burn.

If the airflow through the engine is increased without the proportion of fuel being increased, it is possible to get to a very lean state. Plastic melting conditions......
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Coolant temperature and exhaust has temps are not in the same category..... At the head, exhaust gas temps can be over 1000 F. When the exhaust goes through the catalytic converter, the temperature is raised further.

The state of tune of a motor contributes as well. When the combustion process consumes all of the fuel in the charge, there is no fuel left to evaporate. The gasses are at their hottest possible state. This is called running lean. A charge with left over fuel can be various states of 'rich'.. Far better for all concerned with the engine's health, as the left over fuel evaporates and cools the gasses.

Kawasaki knows that, and designs their OEM set-up to meet emissions requirements. The OEM configuration is as lean as Kawasaki can make it. Piggyback fuel management systems cheat and trick the ECU into adding more fuel so there is more available to burn.

If the airflow through the engine is increased without the proportion of fuel being increased, it is possible to get to a very lean state. Plastic melting conditions......
Okay, I’ll see if it’s running lean, and see about a tuner. Hopefully I get a call today, if not I’ll call before they close. Thanks for the thorough reply
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Think I got it fixed. Mechanic put a clamp on the exhaust to keep in in place away from the plastic, hopefully that does it
 
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