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My front tire used to spin a full turn with the stock rotors. Now it spins for days without drag with my full floating rotors. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
My front tire used to spin a full turn with the stock rotors. Now it spins for days without drag with my full floating rotors. lol
Thanks for that JD lol

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Yeah I am a little leery about rebuilding the calipers. I can only imagine the cement Kawi used to bolt the halves together. They are not leaking, but I am concerned if any of the chipped powder coating from the banjos got into the calipers. What calipers are you using now?

. I don't really know how much I should expect it to spin, but this isn't good at all. I'm usually happy if it spins about twice around and comes to a gradual stop from whatever drag there is.

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The bolts should have locktite, you shouldnt need too much force to remove them though as they are only torqued to 20 ft-lbs. With my oem setup my wheel spins at least 10 times after a good yank. It would only spin 2 maybe 3 times before I rebuilt the calipers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
The bolts should have locktite, you shouldnt need too much force to remove them though as they are only torqued to 20 ft-lbs. With my oem setup my wheel spins at least 10 times after a good yank. It would only spin 2 maybe 3 times before I rebuilt the calipers.
Since I have the calipers off the bike I think I am going to go ahead and rebuild them and replace the seals. It looks pretty straight forward but is there anything I should be aware of? The manual states to replace the fluid seals, but it mentions to replace the dust seals if damaged or worn. Did you guys just replace all the seals?

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Since I have the calipers off the bike I think I am going to go ahead and rebuild them and replace the seals. It looks pretty straight forward but is there anything I should be aware of? The manual states to replace the fluid seals, but it mentions to replace the dust seals if damaged or worn. Did you guys just replace all the seals?

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All of them. Dont forget the little one in between the 2 halves of the caliper. When you're rebuilding them, be very careful not to damage the pistons when removing them and don't damage the caliper when removing the old seals. Also do you have a piston removal tool? If you don't, buy one. Do NOT use a pliers to get the piston out of the caliper. You will be buying new pistons if you do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
All of them. Dont forget the little one in between the 2 halves of the caliper. When you're rebuilding them, be very careful not to damage the pistons when removing them and don't damage the caliper when removing the old seals. Also do you have a piston removal tool? If you don't, buy one. Do NOT use a pliers to get the piston out of the caliper. You will be buying new pistons if you do.
Thanks man. I ordered all the seals yesterday. Removing the pistons is probably my biggest concern. The manual mentions using compressed air or pumping them out while still attached to the lines(too late for that). It's funny how the "MC garage tutorial video" Ari uses pliers wrapped in a rag to lightly pull them out of brembo calipers. Lol

So after I rebuild my calipers, I'm hoping they function like new. On top of that I'll have new Core Moto lines, and new Vesrah pads all connected to the Brembo M/C. It kind of pains me to have used OEM rotors however they are both straight, and plenty thick but have been sitting in a closet for who knows how long. I'm hoping the buttons function properly. I actually have 2 sets of oem rotors, one set that I got on eBay which is plenty thick and looked awesome but it turned out one is badly warped(my fault for not checking runout immediately). The other is straight as an arrow. Should I use the 2 straightest rotors even though they are from 2 different bikes? Both 09's and within .002." Thick of each other.

Or plan B, I happened to get an email from "Sunstar Engineering Italy" via Hookit.com last night who makes the "Braking SK2" rotors. I applied for sponsorship and they are offering me a pretty sweet deal on parts! How many of you use Braking rotors? What are your thoughts? I feel like I have heard nothing but good things about them. Has anyone used their P1R sintered race pads?
I really didn't want to spend more money on upgrades, but like I said, who knows how my 2 random oem rotors will perform.

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Thanks man. I ordered all the seals yesterday. Removing the pistons is probably my biggest concern. The manual mentions using compressed air or pumping them out while still attached to the lines(too late for that). It's funny how the "MC garage tutorial video" Ari uses pliers wrapped in a rag to lightly pull them out of brembo calipers. Lol

So after I rebuild my calipers, I'm hoping they function like new. On top of that I'll have new Core Moto lines, and new Vesrah pads all connected to the Brembo M/C. It kind of pains me to have used OEM rotors however they are both straight, and plenty thick but have been sitting in a closet for who knows how long. I'm hoping the buttons function properly. I actually have 2 sets of oem rotors, one set that I got on eBay which is plenty thick and looked awesome but it turned out one is badly warped(my fault for not checking runout immediately). The other is straight as an arrow. Should I use the 2 straightest rotors even though they are from 2 different bikes? Both 09's and within .002." Thick of each other.

Or plan B, I happened to get an email from "Sunstar Engineering Italy" via Hookit.com last night who makes the "Braking SK2" rotors. I applied for sponsorship and they are offering me a pretty sweet deal on parts! How many of you use Braking rotors? What are your thoughts? I feel like I have heard nothing but good things about them. Has anyone used their P1R sintered race pads?
I really didn't want to spend more money on upgrades, but like I said, who knows how my 2 random oem rotors will perform.

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Their are currently OEM rotors from 2 different bikes on my bike, never had an issue. Just lightly clean them both with some green scotch brite pads to knock off any glaze from old brake pads and your new pads should bed in at the same rates. But if I had trick-ass Carrozzeria wheels on my bike, I would probably get some trick-ass rotors to match. :O
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Their are currently OEM rotors from 2 different bikes on my bike, never had an issue. Just lightly clean them both with some green scotch brite pads to knock off any glaze from old brake pads and your new pads should bed in at the same rates. But if I had trick-ass Carrozzeria wheels on my bike, I would probably get some trick-ass rotors to match. :O
good point!

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
So after my last post it was a waiting game on the seals to rebuild my calipers, my new lines from Core Moto, and what rotors to go with. I had a race round with OMRRA at PIR on 7/20-21 and new I was gonna be cutting it close. As of the morning of the 16th I still had no idea when my parts were going to arrive. Later on that day I got word that everything should be in by the 18th. Which gives me a 1+ day to rebuild the calipers, install the new lines and pads front and rear, and bleed both systems. I was a little concerned about the caliper rebuild since I hadn't done it before. I also decided to stick with the OEM rotors that I picked up since they were plenty thick and straight, and more than capable.
The seals actually arrived a day early so my plan was to rebuild the calipers as soon as I can on the 18th, then wait for my lines to arrive later on that day around 4pm.
The caliper assembly bolts weren't too bad to break loose using the correct "E-socket, E12", and I went the way of compressed air to pop the pistons out enough to remove them by hand. Just place like a 1/4" board between the pistons to not only prevent them from shooting out, but to basically mimic the rotor and provide resistance so that it will force them all out evenly once the piston with the least resistance comes to a stop. Watch your fingers! These things will fire out quickly! You can then split the caliper and half and remove the pistons by hand. Mine were definitely sticky and only one on each caliper moved pretty freely with the compressed air.
I then used a small dental pick to pry out the seals. Don't use anything too sharp though, you don't want to mar the surfaces. I cleaned the inside of the caliper where the pistons and seals sit the best that I could with a rag, then began to reinstall the new seals. I made sure to lube them up with brake fluid, and gently worked them into place. They find their way in nicely into the grooves. The dust seals (thicker seals lower down) didn't seem bad at all, but I replaced them anyway. The fluid seals up top and thinner and flimsy so you definitely need to replace them.
As I'm in the middle of this process I get a call from a fellow racer/board member. OMRRA hired Ken Hill to attend 2 of our rounds this year to lend his knowledge to our expert racers. On the Friday before the round, he will have classroom sessions all throughout the day to teach amd answer any questions, but during the race round he will personally work with 10 racers to help them become safer, and faster riders! I was lucky enough to be one of the 10 racers he was gonna work with that weekend! Meanwhile my calipers are in pieces and I still didn't have the lines in my possesion 36 hours before the first practice. Ugh the pressure was on now!
Got the calipers buttoned back up, with the new Vesrah srjl-xx pads installed by about 5pm Thursday. Then went to check the mail and the Core Moto lines did arrive! But I was getting tired already of working on the bike under pressure. Lol


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Good job! When I did mine I used Q-tips to thoroughly clean the the grooves that the seals reside in; I found the grooves to contain a lot of crud and it took some real effort to get them spotless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Good job! When I did mine I used Q-tips to thoroughly clean the the grooves that the seals reside in; I found the grooves to contain a lot of crud and it took some real effort to get them spotless.
Thanks man, yeah there was definitely a lot of gunk behind the seals! I made sure to take some time to clean it all out for the new seals to seat as best they can.
Now it was time for the lines. I can't say enough about Core Moto, the owner and President Luke got back to me asap and did everything he could to make things right. They have been testing a new coating for the banjo fittings with some of their riders such as Josh Hayes and Richie Escalante, as well as Josh Herrin's street bike. They are going to phase it into production soon, and since they were out of the traditional black fittings he offered the new black coating to me! It's pretty slick and kinda cool that I'm one of the first to have this setup.
I had been using aftermarket titanium banjo bolts for the M/C's and calipers, but decided to use the Brembo supplied banjo, as well as the Core Moto supplied banjo bolts. I figured they put more R & D into their bolts than someone just machining generic titanium banjo bolts. It took more time than I thought to get the lines and banjos to line up and mount correctly, but did my best to make sure they were routed well and not under stress. All I know is I was filling and bleeding the front brake system in the garage until about 10:30pm that Thursday night before my round! It was a long day, but was feeling pretty good about the front. Still had the rear system to attend to on Friday morning, and get some testing done in the limited space I have on my street.


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I do, with a toothbrush and soapy water. I haven't taken it the step further and secured a nut and bolt through them to move them around however. I bought them brand new before the 2017 season.
To rule out the rotors I am gonna run a set of oem that I picked up that are much straighter and just as thick. I am also going back to the Vesrah RJL's.
RJ, have you rebuilt your calipers within your 60k miles? I didn't know if I should get in there since I have them removed at the moment. I figured I'd just remove the pads, and try to squeeze the pistons out a bit to clean them even better. I'm having trouble getting them all to pop out as much as I'd like though.

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Don't use a bolt to turn the buttons, use a wooden dowel instead.

Also, remove the calipers & rotors; place rotors on a smooth surface - like a glass table top or counter top. Check them to see if they are true or have become warped. If they seemed to be true address them using a hand drill & brake hone on both the inside and outside of the rotors. Recheck. If rotors are warped don't reinstall! Take them to a brake/machine shop & have them turned (if within specs). If not able to turn, discard & replace rotors.

Remember to use brake fluid to clean the pistons - if you've cooked fluid onto the walls of the pistons/caliper you might need to touch up with steel wool or ultra fine wet/dry sand paper, clean using only isopropyl alcohol or disc brake fluid - Do Not get aggressive with abrasive products, be patient when removing coked brake fluid. And remember to lube the fluid & dust seals with Si grease. Obviously wear latex/silicone gloves when using brake fluid.
 

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...And remember to lube the fluid & dust seals with Si grease.
That’s interesting in that the OEM manual says nothing about using grease. I searched “high and low” for support to the argument to use an assembly grease, and the cons seemed to outweigh the pros. The against issues were the grease attracting and retaining dirt, and the concern of the grease contaminating the brake fluid. I ended up following the manual and just using brake fluid as assembly lubricant. Still don’t know what is the “correct” technique.

What brand of Si grease is sold for that use? I have heard that Brembo makes something like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
The rear caliper was easier to rebuild than the front. I got some new pads from Renthal (RC-1) earlier in the season and threw those in as well. I also cleaned and took some scotch brite to all off the brake pad pins to ensure the pads can move freely back and forth. Again it took some maneuvering to get the lines and banjos to line up well enough so that I wasn't stressing the line. If it wasn't in such a time crunch it may have seemed easier haha.
Another thing I did on both front and rear systems was to use the banjo bolts supplied by Core Moto, and the Brembo double banjo bolt that came with the M/C. I had been using aftermarket Titanium banjos all around, but like I mentioned earlier the orifices were significantly different sizes compared to the bolts that were made for the lines and MC. It may not be a big deal but I was trying to rule out any possible weak points. Obviously I used brand new crush washers, and took the time to measure the spacing of the orifice on the bolts, and use the correct thickness of crush washer to have the lines perfectly centered for ideal fluid travel. Again maybe a bit of overkill, but I don't plan on doing this again for awhile.


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I'm sure at this point Rivers thinks I'm an idiot, LOL. No, I haven't rebuilt my calipers. It's obviously a good idea; it hasn't bit me in the arse yet and I don't place all that serious a demand on my brakes just riding on the street.

A track bike which sees multiple heavy heat cycles each time it's used, and then sits for a week or two before getting ridden just as hard I would probably pay considerably more attention -- especially if I am getting indications of something amiss.

The extra time doing preventative maintenance is far better than having to mend your body, and then do it anyway.

v/r,
Good call on possibly warped rotor. The Kawasaki manual says to rebuild the brake pistons & seals every 2nd brake pad change, and it doesn't seem too hard just involved to pump the piston out, clean it, change the seals, and bleed the brakes.
 

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That’s interesting in that the OEM manual says nothing about using grease. I searched “high and low” for support to the argument to use an assembly grease, and the cons seemed to outweigh the pros. The against issues were the grease attracting and retaining dirt, and the concern of the grease contaminating the brake fluid. I ended up following the manual and just using brake fluid as assembly lubricant. Still don’t know what is the “correct” technique.

What brand of Si grease is sold for that use? I have heard that Brembo makes something like that.
Manual does say to just coat it in brake fluid. For the actual piston to the brake contact I just use a silicone caliper pin grease on the piston lip, and the rear plated side of the brake so the piston doesn't stick to the brake pad. It's good practice.
 

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That’s interesting in that the OEM manual says nothing about using grease. I searched “high and low” for support to the argument to use an assembly grease, and the cons seemed to outweigh the pros. The against issues were the grease attracting and retaining dirt, and the concern of the grease contaminating the brake fluid. I ended up following the manual and just using brake fluid as assembly lubricant. Still don’t know what is the “correct” technique.

What brand of Si grease is sold for that use? I have heard that Brembo makes something like that.

Manual does say to just coat it in brake fluid. For the actual piston to the brake contact I just use a silicone caliper pin grease on the piston lip, and the rear plated side of the brake so the piston doesn't stick to the brake pad. It's good practice.
So I am looking at doing a caliper rebuild also, and researching all around before I start this project. I did find in the manual where it does suggest to use Si grease on both the fluid seal and the dust seal. I copied below the excerpt from the Periodic Maintenance section 2-61 for the 2009-2012 ZX6r:


108368
 
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