Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got her 2 days ago, a full service will follow. She limits the revs to 12k sometimes, under hard throttle, in idle or gear. If I accelerate slowly, she goes to redline but as soon as I give it full throttle she's going back to 12-13k.
I just stopped now on the road to record this. I'm kinda concerned it's something serious since it's my first bike...
I uploaded a video:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Could be several things, but probably worth doing the basic tune up steps first. Filters, spark plugs, fresh gas (and some of your favourite fuel system cleaner). From there on to cleaning fuel injectors, and fuel pump strainer, or just drop a whole new fuel pump in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I will be away from home for the next month, maintenance is planned for when I get back. Was thinking to drop a new fuel pump directly in, but I will follow your advice and maybe it will be solved. Thank you!
Also, a dreaded oil question. I have no idea what oil is in the bike now, got her from a garage that deals second-hand bikes, and they "advised" to put 15w-50 due to the mileage (51k km). Should I follow it or put 10w-40 as the manufacturer recommends?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeesh, you bought from a dealer and it runs like a bag of crap and they’re telling you to run heavier oil than spec? I’m seeing red flags here man. Best of luck.
Yeah I'm starting to notice that she doesn't run as smoothly as I thought during the first rides...hoping to not have bought a POS that I have to rebuild..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Agreed that you should stay with the recommended oil weight. Also, that sounds like a scary shop!
It has very good reviews, from what I could find online, and it was recommended by the biker community in that area of the country. I'm hoping I'm just paranoid and worried, due to it being my first bike, and the rev issue is just the fuel pump (the bike sat for a few months before I bought it). And the small other noises that I hear are just my paranoid brain.
I only rode it 3 times, about 400km in total. Engine runs smoothly, it accelerates without hiccups, the rev issue happens often, but not always. Also:
1. when accelerating to redline in 1st gear, if I close the throttle fully the bike "vibrates" when engine breaking. In other gears/revs it engine breaks without issues, "smoothly", although really hard (not used to it coming from cars). Won't do it again anyway, I feel it losing grip on the rear sometimes.
2. sometimes(not always) I smell gasoline when I tuck in, but i read that it's normal to smell it, especially on underseat exhaust bikes.
3. Is it normal to hear the front pads when breaking? I'm guessing yes, but I'm a noob (hopefully not a squid).
4. was surprised when I heard pops and a tiny flame when revving it all the way up and letting off (about 50-60mph, clutch fully engaged, idk why I did it, heard a pop and loved the sound, did it a few times and looked at the exhaust). She also pops (small pops) sometimes in city riding in 5th or 6th gear and low revs (4-6k maximum and closing throttle). Stock exhaust, don't think I have power commander, didn't see it under the seat.
 

·
Registered
2022 ZX-6R KRT ABS
Joined
·
68 Posts
And I'll add be sure you use a motorcycle oil -- for a wet clutch -- you need an oil with these specifications:
  • API SG or better (the "G" letter increases with better), and
  • JASO MA or a derivative (like MA1 or MA2) for your wet clutch.
Looking at your service manual, I don't believe you have a slipper clutch (I see no ramps on your pressure plate), so I'd be really careful using engine braking in 1st gear at high rpm -- you can easily skid the rear wheel... (A slipper clutch helps prevent this by disengaging the clutch under high reverse torque using the ramps -- but that also totally depends on having the right oil for the wet clutch!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
If the engine is not at operating temperature, the amount of fuel remaining in the exhaust will be greater….. because motorcycles have extremely short exhausts, you’ll smell that on your clothes.

The further you ride, the less of the smell will linger. Especially after the engine warms up.


I can’t hear my pads on the rotors, because of my hearing protection…. Earplugs and FF helmet. I like what hearing I have left.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the answers!
I felt it lose traction, won't do it again, and I'll make sure I'll get a good quality oil.
RJ, I always use full gear(almost, the boots didn't arrive yet, but they will until I'm back home). I'm gonna get a pair of earplugs also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
Not being able to reach maximum rpm typically indicates a problem with fuel delivery, or an engine in need of a tune up.

Compression braking in first that makes the back shudder and jerk around would make me look closely at the final drive as the very first troubleshooting step. Photos of the chain and both sprockets will tell the tale.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Not being able to reach maximum rpm typically indicates a problem with fuel delivery, or an engine in need of a tune up.

Compression braking in first that makes the back shudder and jerk around would make me look closely at the final drive as the very first troubleshooting step. Photos of the chain and both sprockets will tell the tale.
I left home for 4 weeks, the bike will receive a full tune up as soon as I get back home. I'll try to get a hold of some photos. I felt the whole bike shuddering, lightly vibrating, mainly because the front brake fluid reservoir was vibrating.
I was just trying to collect as much info as possible before I get back so I can do as much as possible to it.
For now I have planned this much:
-oil and filter change
-air filter
-coolant replacement
-brake fluid replacement
-new spark plugs, measure the coils and renew if needed
-new chain and sprockets
-rear damper checked/replaced (I can't see anything wrong with it, but the garage I took it from said it doesn't work as good as it should ), will ask the garage where I take it to look into it
-fork inspection and reseal if needed
Anything else I should add to the list for my peace of mind as a new owner? I don't have a service history, unfortunately...valve inspection maybe??

The season will be all but over by the time I get home, maybe I'm lucky and I'll catch a few days of riding before putting her into winter storage (I need front/rear standers and a trickle charger).

Is it an issue if I perform all the maintenance and the bike then goes into storage for the winter?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
Yes valve clearances need to be checked and adjusted as necessary. It would be a good idea to service the wheel bearings, as well as the steering neck bearings.

If the age of the battery is unknown, it’s probably a good idea to plan on replacing it.

Any bike that is 15 years old would benefit from having every electrical connection separated and adding dielectric grease to ensure consistent electrical system performance. This includes green wire to frame connections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I
Yes valve clearances need to be checked and adjusted as necessary. It would be a good idea to service the wheel bearings, as well as the steering neck bearings.

If the age of the battery is unknown, it’s probably a good idea to plan on replacing it.

Any bike that is 15 years old would benefit from having every electrical connection separated and adding dielectric grease to ensure consistent electrical system performance. This includes green wire to frame connections.
I'll add them to the list. Are they usually expensive jobs? I do need to budget a bit, I hope I don't go over what I paid for it in maintenance 😂
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
The only way to be assured of trouble free operation for as long a period as possible is to verify all scheduled maintenance has been completed in a known time frame.

Labor at any shop is normally at least as much money as the parts cost. That’s why it hurts when you run into a shady mechanic. Hard to validate the results without paying another mechanic to check their work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
It’s worth your time to check the production date on your tires as well. There will be a rectangle on the sidewall of each tire with a 4 digit code. The first 2 digits represent the week of manufacture, so that can be anything from 01 to 51. The second pair is the year, last two digits. 2001 = 01, 2022 = 22.

Anything more than 5 years old, is going to be degraded. The rubber becomes more and more stiff as it outgasses which leads to less traction. When you have to replace the tires, get new valve stems as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
I try and suggest that you are better off ensuring that the bike operates at its best, than worrying about how it looks. Make sure it stops well, then handles well, the runs well…. After all of that pimp your ride to your heart’s content.

Almost everything we’re discussing can be done with hand tools by a reasonably competent home mechanic. Personally I steer away from transmission work and engine bottom end work.

Clutches, water and oil pumps, that’s relatively easy.

All of the fluid changes I would recommend you get comfortable with…. The shop manual will guide you through the process, which gets easier every time you do it.

It is usually far less expensive to take a wheel to the tire shop than to take the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thank you for all the replies guys! Ever since I started researching the bike/gear and everything related, the bikers were most helpful everytime.
On my first ride, when I received the first two fingers down salute I was giggling like a little girl, it's good that the helmet covers it😂
What surprised me most was when another biker just stopped and asked me if everything is okay and offered help when I was stopped on the side of the road just to stretch and smoke a cigarette. This world is amazing!

I know my way around a spanner, I'm an engineer working onboard ships, went over the service manual and most of the things there are pretty straightforward.The fluids,chain, filters, plugs and the rest of the basics I can do. Valve adjustment I wouldn't touch even if I do it constantly at my job. My limitations at home are tools, which I don't quite have, and a proper working area, seeing as I live in an apartment, but I'll try to find a garage I can work in.
Another one would be the size of the thing, I'm used to working on marine engines(1-10k KW), not "toy-sized" ones. I hate teeny tiny parts which I can barely get my fingers on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,268 Posts
A few decades ago, I was stationed on board CVN-65, and was assigned a collateral duty as a damage control investigator.... that meant during drills, my job was to go through all my assigned spaces and seek out the source of damage. Being an aviation guy, I really lived on that ship from the waterline up. No normal need for me to go down the other 6 or 7 decks of the ship below the waterline until I was assigned that job.

Finding a diesel generator that was easily 15' or more high, and at least 40' long during that process was fairly awe inspiring..... only to be told that it was one of three diesel, and three steam driven back up generators in case the nuclear power plant(s) were all damaged or out of commission. Holy back up generators, Batman!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top