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Discussion Starter #1
Well as the title suggests, I swapped out my OEM stator cover for a nice beefy Woodcraft unit. After a crash at the track my OEM piece was ground down to a paper thin state and needed to be replaced.

First of all, why the fuck did Kawi decide to use those horrid star bolts on the stator itself? No matter how I tried to get them out, even with the use of heat, I could not make them budge. Then to make things more annoying to get to the stator plug, uplug it, and remove the entire assembly from the bike, I had to lift the tank and remove the two coolant reservoir bolts.

Finally got it all off the bike and hit it with the air impact gun only to snap my torx bit. Then I went out and bought a hardened steel T30 bit and finally managed to get all 4 bolts out. Rather than reuse those pieces of shit, I hit the local autoparts store and got compatible M6 collared bolts. They were a bit longer than the OEM bolts, but I figured I would give them a shot. Of course, they were too long and were bottoming out before snugging up, so I had to use the dremel to cut them down by about 1/4 of an inch.

All said and done I got it all back together yesterday afternoon, but what a fcking hassle!
 

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The easy way would have been to use a long T-handle. You can actually apply more torque with a long shank than you can with a small, short hardened bit.

I use Matco t-handle torx keys



Also, the same rule applies with just about any screw. For instance, if you have a stubborn phillips screw, use a long of a shank screwdriver as you can and it will output the most torque without stripping the fastener. The torsional flex of the tool adds to the input force on the fastener. Pretty cool really. I have a 24" long phillips screwdriver for this very reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The easy way would have been to use a long T-handle. You can actually apply more torque with a long shank than you can with a small, short hardened bit.

I use Matco t-handle torx keys



Also, the same rule applies with just about any screw. For instance, if you have a stubborn phillips screw, use a long of a shank screwdriver as you can and it will output the most torque without stripping the fastener. The torsional flex of the tool adds to the input force on the fastener. Pretty cool really. I have a 24" long phillips screwdriver for this very reason.
Thanks for the tip, and that totally makes sense. I think I will return the set of torx bits I got and invest in something like this.
 
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