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i have an 03 zx6r and everything has been running fine with the bike . i changed the levers the other day and power washed it at the car wash. later on while in 2nd gear , i hit WOT at about 6k rpm bike took off and then seemed to slip into neutral for a second rev up and then re-engage with the gear and continue pulling. any thoughts on weather i need to check clutch adjustments on cable or if i sprayed something while cleaning the motor off. Idk if I could have hit anything with power hose and messed it up. thanks for the help
 

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i have an 03 zx6r and everything has been running fine with the bike . i changed the levers the other day and power washed it at the car wash. later on while in 2nd gear , i hit WOT at about 6k rpm bike took off and then seemed to slip into neutral for a second rev up and then re-engage with the gear and continue pulling. any thoughts on weather i need to check clutch adjustments on cable or if i sprayed something while cleaning the motor off. Idk if I could have hit anything with power hose and messed it up. thanks for the help
Not a good idea to put a motorcycle through a car wash.

Can you reproduce the issue every time you go WOT in second gear, or any other gear?
When you say "it seemed to slip into neutral" - did the neutral light illuminate?
 

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If this is the first time the bike has ever done this to you, it is reasonable to think that the pressure washer had something to do with it. Forcing water and dirt past seals, into connectors and past bushings into areas that are meant to be filled with grease can cause all sorts of issues.

I would personally start with the shifter linkage, and the clutch. If the seals on the shifter got gummed up, that will cause the linkage to stick slightly which will cause false neutrals and getting stuck in a gear because the previous shift was not actually completed. Same thing is true of the clutch..... the cable needs to move freely, the pivots need to work smoothly.

The second most likely thing to cause problems are your new levers. If they are hanging up, or bind up in some way; mis adjusted, cables routed poorly to/from them. All of that can cause shifting issues.

So, let's talk about what a properly adjusted clutch lever should be like:

The lever will not always 'face' the same distance between the end of the clip on, and the clutch lever on the transmission. Because the lever is mounted 'ahead' of the pivot point of the triple tree/clip on bars, the distance changes as you pivot the bars. When they are all the way turned to the right (as you sit on the bike), the left bar tip is the closest it will ever be, to the clutch -- located on the right side of the transmission. The cable between the hand lever and the transmission is a two part affair; the inner cable, and the outer sheath. The inner cable never changes length, and that is the part that operates the clutch. Slack adjustments are made, by changing the length of the sheath. When the bars are turned all the way left, the distance is greatest.

Most people set their lever so it engages as soon as they touch the lever. Most of the time that adjustment is made, when the bars are pointing straight ahead.

The goal of the adjustment is to make sure that the clutch lever only separates the friction and pressure plates when you need to do so. There has to be adequate slack in the adjustment to ensure that the lever isn't making the clutch slip due to being slightly engaged. This is why the shop and owner's manuals both say to leave a bit of 'play' in the lever. On a full length lever, the tip needs to be able to 'wiggle' by roughly 1/4" when the bars are pointing straight ahead. If you want to set it for the smallest space you should, turn the bars all the way left, and check the slack/play in the clutch lever. Still needs to move slightly, without making the clutch disengage.
 

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If it's not the adjustments for the levers, or the cables..... you could be looking at a worn shifter dog in the transmission, or worn out sprockets/chain.

Pics of your bike will help us in diagnosis.
 

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If this is the first time the bike has ever done this to you, it is reasonable to think that the pressure washer had something to do with it. Forcing water and dirt past seals, into connectors and past bushings into areas that are meant to be filled with grease can cause all sorts of issues.

I would personally start with the shifter linkage, and the clutch. If the seals on the shifter got gummed up, that will cause the linkage to stick slightly which will cause false neutrals and getting stuck in a gear because the previous shift was not actually completed. Same thing is true of the clutch..... the cable needs to move freely, the pivots need to work smoothly.

The second most likely thing to cause problems are your new levers. If they are hanging up, or bind up in some way; mis adjusted, cables routed poorly to/from them. All of that can cause shifting issues.

So, let's talk about what a properly adjusted clutch lever should be like:

The lever will not always 'face' the same distance between the end of the clip on, and the clutch lever on the transmission. Because the lever is mounted 'ahead' of the pivot point of the triple tree/clip on bars, the distance changes as you pivot the bars. When they are all the way turned to the right (as you sit on the bike), the left bar tip is the closest it will ever be, to the clutch -- located on the right side of the transmission. The cable between the hand lever and the transmission is a two part affair; the inner cable, and the outer sheath. The inner cable never changes length, and that is the part that operates the clutch. Slack adjustments are made, by changing the length of the sheath. When the bars are turned all the way left, the distance is greatest.

Most people set their lever so it engages as soon as they touch the lever. Most of the time that adjustment is made, when the bars are pointing straight ahead.

The goal of the adjustment is to make sure that the clutch lever only separates the friction and pressure plates when you need to do so. There has to be adequate slack in the adjustment to ensure that the lever isn't making the clutch slip due to being slightly engaged. This is why the shop and owner's manuals both say to leave a bit of 'play' in the lever. On a full length lever, the tip needs to be able to 'wiggle' by roughly 1/4" when the bars are pointing straight ahead. If you want to set it for the smallest space you should, turn the bars all the way left, and check the slack/play in the clutch lever. Still needs to move slightly, without making the clutch disengage.
Well said. I will be changing out my levers soon and will keep this in mind.
 

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^^ bear in mind, levers off eBay are not under the same level of quality control as some manufacturers maintain. It's a simple enough part, but the devil is in the details. This is why I am so slow to change out levers from OEM. I like the long levers so I don't have to apply a lot of force, they work well, and are durable. Any after market vendors are typically small shops with limited budgets. Validation testing is expensive. Quality, is expensive.

The best bet for high quality levers will be from companies that are making components that use the levers they are offering. Because they have some volume of production the development costs can be spread over the production run, the unit price can be lower. A company that is a supplier to a major mfg, may well sell the same levers as they sell to the mfg, with different paint, etc.

Most of the production of high volume levers is done in China. The on site reps for the companies that buy those parts and re-sell them under their brand name reject some portion of the manufactured product. The factory is supposed to scrap any rejects, but quite often will sell them as knock offs or as the 'real thing' on internet sites.

Look at the brand you are considering -- look at the company's retail website, and see what they charge for their product. Then, compare that to what pricing you can find and make your decision. If a different coating is applied than what the engineers specified, the part will not perform the same. Too thick, it binds up. Too thin, it's sloppy. Tolerances in 1/100 mm are not uncommon.
 

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^^ bear in mind, levers off eBay are not under the same level of quality control as some manufacturers maintain. It's a simple enough part, but the devil is in the details. This is why I am so slow to change out levers from OEM. I like the long levers so I don't have to apply a lot of force, they work well, and are durable. Any after market vendors are typically small shops with limited budgets. Validation testing is expensive. Quality, is expensive.

The best bet for high quality levers will be from companies that are making components that use the levers they are offering. Because they have some volume of production the development costs can be spread over the production run, the unit price can be lower. A company that is a supplier to a major mfg, may well sell the same levers as they sell to the mfg, with different paint, etc.

Most of the production of high volume levers is done in China. The on site reps for the companies that buy those parts and re-sell them under their brand name reject some portion of the manufactured product. The factory is supposed to scrap any rejects, but quite often will sell them as knock offs or as the 'real thing' on internet sites.

Look at the brand you are considering -- look at the company's retail website, and see what they charge for their product. Then, compare that to what pricing you can find and make your decision. If a different coating is applied than what the engineers specified, the part will not perform the same. Too thick, it binds up. Too thin, it's sloppy. Tolerances in 1/100 mm are not uncommon.

Will stick to a good set of Pazzo/ASV, any other good brands to consider?

I have had aftermarket levers on my previous bikes and generally prefer them over OEM due to adjustability. I prefer very early clutch engagements and my levers are usually all the way in compared to most people's.

I don't buy knock-offs due to quality issues and also, I don't want to pay people who don't respect patents and other people's hard work designing good products. Some of the Chinese products are good, especially those who actually design and manufacture their own stuff...but certainly not the $30 levers that come in rainbow colours.

Sorry for hijacking OP's thread!
 
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