01 Ninja no spark - ZX6R Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 06-08-2017, 08:34 PM Thread Starter
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01 Ninja no spark

Hi I have an 01 ninja 600 and back in December I had to lay my bike down to avoid an accident with another vehicle. So since the incident my bike has lost spark and I am having trouble figuring out why. I'm having a tough time finding a wiring diagram or really just any helpful information. I have been told tip over switch but I don't think my bike is equipped with one. I have no broken wires and all fuses are good and the motor cranks over and gets fuel just no spark any information or help would be greatly appreciated thank you
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post #2 of 13 Old 06-09-2017, 01:54 AM
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The shop manual for that bike is available for download from this site. Priceless tool. All the schematics, and troubleshooting matrix are in there.

If there is a tip over switch, it's probably in the tail section.

If you have the manual and a multimeter, it's a matter of time, and keeping good notes to get to the bottom of this.

"Basic stuff fellas. Use your head for something other than to break your next fall."

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post #3 of 13 Old 06-09-2017, 03:50 PM Thread Starter
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Do you happen to have the link
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post #4 of 13 Old 06-10-2017, 09:40 PM
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Have you tried taking the tank off an checking the positive and negative on ignition coils they could have pulled off

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post #5 of 13 Old 06-10-2017, 09:51 PM
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There will be two sets probably on left and right side with two smaller gauge wires with clips red should be positive unless someone messed with it

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post #6 of 13 Old 06-11-2017, 06:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder3131 View Post
Hi I have an 01 ninja 600 and back in December I had to lay my bike down to avoid an accident with another vehicle. .................
This statement is one of those, that every experienced rider has heard time and again. Not to beat you while you're down, but:

If you were in a position where you skidded the tires hard enough to have the bike go out from under you, a number of things had to have gone wrong, well in advance of that moment in time. Almost all of them were within your ability to control -- whether you had the experience to recognize the warning signs, and the training to react is a more constructive way seems to be where the issues lay.

All good to be putting the bike back together; the more telling point is going to be what do you plan on doing differently?
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"Basic stuff fellas. Use your head for something other than to break your next fall."

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post #7 of 13 Old 06-11-2017, 08:42 AM
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That whole........... I had to lay it down.......... What do you ride a Harley?


Is this a J model or a D model?

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Stupid people say stupid things on the internet, so be wary of who those people are. If you solicit advice on the internet, just keep in mind 99% of what you'll receive is not based on fact or science-and likely atleast 95% of it is based on bullshit and bravado regurgitated from some other schlub who also did not experience any of what they claim and are also full of shit. If you don't like my bluntness- too bad. I am not here to please you, so move along, your approval is not desired nor is it needed. So before opening your pie hole and adding more stupidity, perhaps sit back, listen, absorb and learn something. You know that saying, it is better to remain silent and thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt!
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post #8 of 13 Old 06-11-2017, 08:51 AM
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Let's not give to much shit we've all had close calls unless you were doing 90 an thought the person really could have got out of ur way lol what side she slide on

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post #9 of 13 Old 06-11-2017, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by zx600rider View Post
Let's not give to much shit we've all had close calls unless you were doing 90 an thought the person really could have got out of ur way lol what side she slide on

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Every bike I have owned, has hit the ground. Most of the time, the speeds were quite low, and I wouldn't have to admit to it. I do anyways, because I want to make sure I examine the scenario, and reduce the probability of repeating the steps which led to that crash.

Close calls are indeed a big part of riding. Over the years, I have made mistakes; the longer I ride the more accidents and close calls I will encounter. The severity of the crashes has been reduced significantly, with changes in behavior.

The difference between close, not close and an impact all come down to the skill of the rider. There's a rare (and I mean REALLY rare) situation that there is nothing the rider could have done to reduce the severity of what happens. If we want to take the time to run through the list, we could..... I'd prefer not to.

The trick is to identify the issue early enough to be able to respond with a very slight change on the part of the rider. The biggest safety tool ANY rider has, is the 7 lbs of fat between their ears. The later the threat is identified, the more significant the response needs to be to avoid contact.

When the 'I had to lay the bike down to avoid a crash' card gets played, that's due in large part to a lack of training, and practice. You can read that as ignorance and apathy, if you want. Chuck Yeager used to say that a pilot crashes when they run out of altitude, airspeed, and ideas all at the same time.

The same sort of thing applies with riding. You hope the bag of luck lasts long enough to be replaced with the experience required. The learning curve is very steep at the start, but should never end. The lessons get smaller but are just as valuable. When we get complacent and think we know it all, is the point at which we will find we have sawed off the branch we are sitting on........
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post #10 of 13 Old 06-11-2017, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RJ2112 View Post
Every bike I have owned, has hit the ground. Most of the time, the speeds were quite low, and I wouldn't have to admit to it. I do anyways, because I want to make sure I examine the scenario, and reduce the probability of repeating the steps which led to that crash.

Close calls are indeed a big part of riding. Over the years, I have made mistakes; the longer I ride the more accidents and close calls I will encounter. The severity of the crashes has been reduced significantly, with changes in behavior.

The difference between close, not close and an impact all come down to the skill of the rider. There's a rare (and I mean REALLY rare) situation that there is nothing the rider could have done to reduce the severity of what happens. If we want to take the time to run through the list, we could..... I'd prefer not to.

The trick is to identify the issue early enough to be able to respond with a very slight change on the part of the rider. The biggest safety tool ANY rider has, is the 7 lbs of fat between their ears. The later the threat is identified, the more significant the response needs to be to avoid contact.

When the 'I had to lay the bike down to avoid a crash' card gets played, that's due in large part to a lack of training, and practice. You can read that as ignorance and apathy, if you want. Chuck Yeager used to say that a pilot crashes when they run out of altitude, airspeed, and ideas all at the same time.

The same sort of thing applies with riding. You hope the bag of luck lasts long enough to be replaced with the experience required. The learning curve is very steep at the start, but should never end. The lessons get smaller but are just as valuable. When we get complacent and think we know it all, is the point at which we will find we have sawed off the branch we are sitting on........
I lost a buddy few years back he was taking a right then another quick right girl rolled over him we play a dangerous game but it's a addiction we can't quit

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post #11 of 13 Old 06-11-2017, 02:57 PM
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^ I am a moth, circling that flame..... I'd like to keep doing it for as many more years as I am allowed.

Riding is a very good mental exercise -- you have to be and stay alert on so many levels that it is an all consuming thing for me. This is one of the primary reasons that drugs and alcohol don't play well with riding. You are doing so many more things at the same time than you have to driving that it's easy to 'lose the bubble'. We're walking that straight line for the LEOs, every moment of every ride. (but it's really for ourselves) If you aren't fit for the challenge, no one can tell you that. You simply have to ride out to your fate -- hopefully the wake up call is minor, and the education surmounts the issue.

Anyone that rides, will come to know people who do not survive the experience. Physics is an unforgiving mistress. Heed the rules, live within your capabilities, and you can ride for many years with only minor discomforts. Exceed what is survivable, and you are gambling that this time, the dice will land in your favor. House rules apply.....

"Basic stuff fellas. Use your head for something other than to break your next fall."

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post #12 of 13 Old 06-11-2017, 05:18 PM
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Visual skills, so you see things early is always a huge key factor.......Most don't see shit until it is too late or requires some extraordinary effort

Practicing a whole slew of rider input skills

But you need to see first, then react properly

Of course vehicle preparedness and having all of it.........tires, brakes, suspension, ergonamics, engine etc.... That is always part of the equation as well


"I had to lay it down" is never the right answer!
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Stupid people say stupid things on the internet, so be wary of who those people are. If you solicit advice on the internet, just keep in mind 99% of what you'll receive is not based on fact or science-and likely atleast 95% of it is based on bullshit and bravado regurgitated from some other schlub who also did not experience any of what they claim and are also full of shit. If you don't like my bluntness- too bad. I am not here to please you, so move along, your approval is not desired nor is it needed. So before opening your pie hole and adding more stupidity, perhaps sit back, listen, absorb and learn something. You know that saying, it is better to remain silent and thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt!
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post #13 of 13 Old 06-12-2017, 12:59 PM
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Not sure if this bike has a "tip over sensor" but you may want to try that
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